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No BS Hiring Advice

You Are Missing Different Groups in Your Recruiting | No BS Hiring Advice


In this video, I point our 3 different groups most organizations do a terrible job of sourcing

Summary

I'm going to talk with those of you who are involved with hiring. And I'll start by saying, I worked in search for more than 40 years, and filled more than 1200 full time positions, plus consulting assignments. I now coach people, so I'm not you're trying to sell you recruiting business. What I'm here to do is to offer some very simple advice in a no BS kind of way because your hiring managers are screwing themselves out of their ignorance and their bigotry. So, there are a number of different groups that could be interviewed and could be hired and do great work for you.
I'll start off with the one group that, time and again, delivers results but for many of your managers, they're worried about nonsense. That group is older workers --seniors, individuals who are close to retirement age, whatever that means these days. They are generally older than the hiring manager and the story they tell themselves is that these people will not take direction, they're burned out tired has-beens. That's a simple way of putting it, right?
And it's a lie that they're telling themselves and you and HR needs to confront it because you're staring at productivity issues. You're staring at them, complaining that they're not seeing enough people and demographics are such that they can take 22 year olds from Gen Z who have no experience. They can do that. Their work ethic is very similar to the older generation.
I'll simply say that, you know, the studies that I've been seeing point to Gen Z as being like a clone of the Baby Boomers in terms of their work ethic. So what's the issue with the Boomers? if you're liking Gen Z, the Boomers actually have experience, they will take direction and they'll work hard. They're not rushing out to retirement because they can't afford it. So, that's one group that you're hiring managers should pay attention to.
Another one, for certain types of positions, are ex-offenders. You know, people who've been incarcerated. Now ex-offenders, as long as they're involved with social services, as well, will work very hard, do a lot of good work. They need certain types of training, and then they need certain types of supports in your organization. But it's a population that gets ignored and often can do jobs that you really need people to do because these are not people who've been trained for accounting and finance or technology. They are labor for a lot of your organizations. Don't neglect ex-offenders, even if you have to pay to train them because once they've trained, they will be loyal.
The third group is moms who are returning from maternity or raising kids, for that matter. This is a workforce that wants to work, has decided that they're ready to work and there are a lot of jobs that they can do and, as an HR professional, you need to fill jobs, right? And your hiring managers want very simple behaviors out of people. What's the cost of training to get someone up to speed on things that they did before? Not all that expensive believe it or not.
I don't care what field this person worked in. They can do the job with a certain amount of training. You can also, if you're paying for training, get them to commit to work for your organization for a certain period of time or be obligated to pay the firm back for that training. It's not difficult. Just don't go crazy with . . . "You have to work for us for three years or else you will have to pay us back."
Nonsense. Absolute nonsense. Don't do that kind of crap. Just amortize it out over the course of a year. If they leave the within the year. They owe you the money back.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Reinventing Your Career | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/04/18/reinventing-your-career-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1078 Reinventing yourself and your career as an older worker.

Summary

This is a video that is designed to talk about reinventing your career that is geared toward older workers. I will start by saying for you as individuals, a lot of you have opinions about how job search is supposed to work and, frankly, things are different now than the way that they were done years ago. I'm not going to review all the particulars; instinctively you know what I'm saying is true plus, you may be dealing with ages. Just accept the fact that things are different now. You don't want to come across as setting your ways, resistance, sluggish, oppositional, doing all the sorts of things that cause less experienced people to think that you are going to be a problem employee. You always want to appear upbeat, enthusiastic, without going to the other extreme.

What I always encourage people to do is to have a look and is appropriate for their age and to work on your weight, if that is an issue. Keep yourself fit and in shape as well as do things that will be helpful to you to keep a high energy level. I use myself as an example of someone who has taken off 30 pounds recently. I feel very different. I have much more energy; the same may become true for you AND it is hard work and something you need to do… And your clothes will fit better.

Update your look. Take off some weight.

Another thing is to inventory your skills. What are your professional skills? What have you done? What are you capable of doing? Look at what you have actually done that is the basis of the inventory. Create a few columns. Jot down the things that you are actually experienced with. Lay it out into columns. Go job by job and jot down what you did and how you went about doing it. Take note of how recently you did it.

Then, as you start to look at opportunities, start to match your skills with the outcomes that you achieved with each employer. For example, if what you did help your firm make $20,000, $200,000 or $2 million, have been jotted down, too. As you start to write your resume, have an eye toward outcomes. Focus on your skills and outcomes that you achieved for your previous employers so that they knew firm has an idea of what you might be able to do for them. So where you go to next is looking at jobs where they need the skills and results that you get.

People will often ask me whether they should use chronological or functional resumes. For those of you who have a consistent work history, stick with the chronological. For those of you making a career change or have a large gap in your employment history or are returning to the workforce, go to functional. I've explained this in the previous video, but this simplifies my thoughts.

You are going to get invitations for interviews and the time to practice is not when you get the invitation because that is going to come in the form of a phone interview. You need to be prepared for phone interviews and regular interviews while you're working on the resume.

Practice. Practice. Practice.

You also want to be out there networking, talking to people who you know about who they know about who might be able to help you find work. Got that? You want to be out there talking to people who you know about who they know, who you don't know who might be able to help you find work.

The reason for doing this is borne out in the statistics. 70% the positions are filled. As a result of networking. 70% of those 70% (49%) are filled as a result of introductions to people who you did not know at the beginning of your job search who helped you with an introduction to result in you being hired. Network.

If you are out of work, start managing your money. You can't spend more than you have. Otherwise you won't have financial staying power to write out a lengthier job-search. You need to get out and about talking to people.

Lastly, if you can find a support group to help you with your search, a networking group to support you with your search, a coach to help you with your search, get support. You don't know what you don't know. The result once a being that you will make tragic mistakes that will cost you opportunities unless you have input from people. Experienced people. People who know what they are doing around job-search.

I always discourage people from asking friends, family, or former managers for advice. Often, these people are well-meaning but as ignorant as you are. They speak with certainty because they got a job once... Or twice… Or 5 times... Or they hired some people in the past. From my experience, hiring managers are often the worst job hunters because they think that everyone does it, and looks for the same things that they do and learn the hard way that things are completely different elsewhere.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Over 50 and Job Hunting

Older Worker? Help Yourself


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/05/08/older-worker-help-yourself/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides several tips for older workers.

Summary

1 of the things I know is the most older workers are fearful of age discrimination. Some of that you may bring on yourself and I want to address some of those things in order to ensure that we can eliminate some of those things and that you have an opportunity to really shine on your interviews.

The 1st thing is just recognize that if your parents looks like it is from the 1950s or 60s, if your hairstyle is not appropriate for modern times, if your wardrobe suggests that is seen better days because it is 20 years old, it is time to get an update-- to change her hairstyle, change your wardrobe to make it more current. I'm not suggesting that you move to the most modern fashions because there is always something ludicrous about extremely old people like me (I'm in my 60s) dressing as though I am in my 20s.

Just be smart and where timeless things but make sure that they appear "current." Even the things that are, shall we say timeless can appear dated... And you know what I mean.

Just show your most recent positions on your resume. No one cares about what you did in 1968. Focusing on the last 10 or 15 years. If you are hired based upon things that you did while Ronald Reagan was president, it is unlikely that you will escape the bias that will come up.

Education – – keep the dates off. A lot of people attempt to be tricky and put the education the end of the resume. Just think it would you normally would and just remove the dates. By showing the last 10 or 15 years of your experience, you will be able to appear more current.

Cover letter – – a quality cover letter goes a long way. Don't send it as an attachment. Send it as the body of the email in order to ensure that people actually read what you want to communicate to them.

If you're only planning on being around for 2 years and then retiring, they probably want to know this, but I wouldn't volunteer to disclose it.

Attitude – – you are someone who has done it before. Carry yourself as someone who is confident and knows what they are doing. If you're asked that classic question of age discrimination, "how would you feel about working for a younger person," answer them by saying, "I've done it all the time. When you get to be my age. Everyone is younger." You accept the fact. Provide as much input as the hiring manager wants to have and keep the rest yourself. If they don't want to hear stuff from you, you don't share it. It's that simple. I try to be supportive an ally. I don't want to be a new headache for that person. That's a very simple way to handle that.

Lastly, anything in your background that demonstrates stability is always an asset for you. Play it up in the course of your interview.

Again, the 1st thing starts off with your appearance. Don't lose sight of your wardrobe. Don't lose sight of your hair. Carry yourself properly. If you have a few panels that you can afford to take off, do it. You may think that your wardrobe is appropriate, but if you are short is screaming open and your bellybutton can be seen while you are seated, if the button on your blouse is pulling, get another blouse. Dress properly.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Older Worker? Help Yourself | Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter provides several tips for older workers.

Summary

1 of the things I know is the most older workers are fearful of age discrimination. Some of that you may bring on yourself and I want to address some of those things in order to ensure that we can eliminate some of those things and that you have an opportunity to really shine on your interviews.

The 1st thing is just recognize that if your parents looks like it is from the 1950s or 60s, if your hairstyle is not appropriate for modern times, if your wardrobe suggests that is seen better days because it is 20 years old, it is time to get an update-- to change her hairstyle, change your wardrobe to make it more current. I'm not suggesting that you move to the most modern fashions because there is always something ludicrous about extremely old people like me (I'm in my 60s) dressing as though I am in my 20s.

Just be smart and where timeless things but make sure that they appear "current." Even the things that are, shall we say timeless can appear dated... And you know what I mean.

Just show your most recent positions on your resume. No one cares about what you did in 1968. Focusing on the last 10 or 15 years. If you are hired based upon things that you did while Ronald Reagan was president, it is unlikely that you will escape the bias that will come up.

Education – – keep the dates off. A lot of people attempt to be tricky and put the education the end of the resume. Just think it would you normally would and just remove the dates. By showing the last 10 or 15 years of your experience, you will be able to appear more current.

Cover letter – – a quality cover letter goes a long way. Don't send it as an attachment. Send it as the body of the email in order to ensure that people actually read what you want to communicate to them.

If you're only planning on being around for 2 years and then retiring, they probably want to know this, but I wouldn't volunteer to disclose it.

Attitude – – you are someone who has done it before. Carry yourself as someone who is confident and knows what they are doing. If you're asked that classic question of age discrimination, "how would you feel about working for a younger person," answer them by saying, "I've done it all the time. When you get to be my age. Everyone is younger." You accept the fact. Provide as much input as the hiring manager wants to have and keep the rest yourself. If they don't want to hear stuff from you, you don't share it. It's that simple. I try to be supportive an ally. I don't want to be a new headache for that person. That's a very simple way to handle that.

Lastly, anything in your background that demonstrates stability is always an asset for you. Play it up in the course of your interview.

Again, the 1st thing starts off with your appearance. Don't lose sight of your wardrobe. Don't lose sight of your hair. Carry yourself properly. If you have a few panels that you can afford to take off, do it. You may think that your wardrobe is appropriate, but if you are short is screaming open and your bellybutton can be seen while you are seated, if the button on your blouse is pulling, get another blouse. Dress properly.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and business life coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

If you are an executive who is interested in 1 on 1 coaching, email me at JeffAltman(at)TheBigGameHunter.us​

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Connect with me on LinkedIn 

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!