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A Question About Discrimination | JobSearchTV.com


When hiring, are you allowed to deny people on a bad personality, or if they don’t embody the company image even if they meet the paper requirements?

Summary

"When hiring, are you allowed to deny people on the bad personality where, if they don't embody the company image, even if they meet the paper requirements."
I want to break this question down into a couple of different components.  The basis of the rejection is your personality, not whether you have the skill… The company image… I'm confused about that but I will try to sort through as I talk.

Discrimination exists, under US law, based upon a number of criteria.  Some states have added additional criteria onto the initial federal wants.  As long as the form of discrimination. Any of those laws, it is not, by definition, discrimination.  It may be discriminatory. It may reflect ignorance, but it is not legally discrimination.

In this example, a person meets the paper requirements and we don't know whether this person displayed their knowledge poorly on the interview.  We are just going to look at what we know here.  This person believes that they were turned down based upon personality and a 2nd criteria.

Personality is not a discriminatory category under any criteria I've ever heard of.  Firms are allowed to evaluate people for "fit" as long as that doesn't fall into a discriminatory category.  For example, we don't think you fit in because we only hire men.  Another example would be your gay and we only hire heterosexuals.  And, of course you are black and we are white or your white or black.  What do you know about our culture without actually giving them a chance to demonstrate that in the course of the interview?  That would be clear discrimination based upon it. Personality… No.

Company Image?
I had a question based upon the phrase, "the company image."  They don't embody "the company image."  I'm wondering whether this is a question about weight and whether this person might be profoundly obese, for example.  In certain states, that behavior might qualify as discrimination.

Ultimately, you have to prove that was the criteria for being rejected by this organization.  That is a hard road to take.  In terms of weight, to my knowledge, an attorney would know this better, you can't use the excuse of, "No one at this firm is morbidly obese."  That's a term that I've heard used, to describe someone who was extremely overweight.  They are at the point of risking death by being that overweight.

Again, if you really believe that this is the case, consult an attorney and see what they have to say.  Find out what it would take to prove your case if the issue is about you being extremely overweight.  See if that would allow you to become a part of a "protected class" under state or federal law.  If you live in a bigger city, you might be protected under local law, as well, because those laws are added on top of the original federal law.

I'm sorry to be more specific, but I think this becomes a way to evaluate whether this is a case of discrimination and whether firms can do it.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

A Question About Discrimination | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/08/a-question-about-discrimination-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1280 When hiring, are you allowed to deny people on a bad personality?

Summary

"When hiring, are you allowed to deny people on the bad personality where, if they don't embody the company image, even if they meet the paper requirements."
I want to break this question down into a couple of different components.  The basis of the rejection is your personality, not whether you have the skill… The company image… I'm confused about that but I will try to sort through as I talk.

Discrimination exists, under US law, based upon a number of criteria.  Some states have added additional criteria onto the initial federal wants.  As long as the form of discrimination. Any of those laws, it is not, by definition, discrimination.  It may be discriminatory. It may reflect ignorance, but it is not legally discrimination.

In this example, a person meets the paper requirements and we don't know whether this person displayed their knowledge poorly on the interview.  We are just going to look at what we know here.  This person believes that they were turned down based upon personality and a 2nd criteria.

Personality is not a discriminatory category under any criteria I've ever heard of.  Firms are allowed to evaluate people for "fit" as long as that doesn't fall into a discriminatory category.  For example, we don't think you fit in because we only hire men.  Another example would be your gay and we only hire heterosexuals.  And, of course you are black and we are white or your white or black.  What do you know about our culture without actually giving them a chance to demonstrate that in the course of the interview?  That would be clear discrimination based upon it. Personality… No.

Company Image?
I had a question based upon the phrase, "the company image."  They don't embody "the company image."  I'm wondering whether this is a question about weight and whether this person might be profoundly obese, for example.  In certain states, that behavior might qualify as discrimination.

Ultimately, you have to prove that was the criteria for being rejected by this organization.  That is a hard road to take.  In terms of weight, to my knowledge, an attorney would know this better, you can't use the excuse of, "No one at this firm is morbidly obese."  That's a term that I've heard used, to describe someone who was extremely overweight.  They are at the point of risking death by being that overweight.

Again, if you really believe that this is the case, consult an attorney and see what they have to say.  Find out what it would take to prove your case if the issue is about you being extremely overweight.  See if that would allow you to become a part of a "protected class" under state or federal law.  If you live in a bigger city, you might be protected under local law, as well, because those laws are added on top of the original federal law.

I'm sorry to be more specific, but I think this becomes a way to evaluate whether this is a case of discrimination and whether firms can do it.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

A Question About Discrimination | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/08/a-question-about-discrimination-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1280 When hiring, are you allowed to deny people on a bad personality?

Summary

"When hiring, are you allowed to deny people on the bad personality where, if they don't embody the company image, even if they meet the paper requirements."
I want to break this question down into a couple of different components.  The basis of the rejection is your personality, not whether you have the skill… The company image… I'm confused about that but I will try to sort through as I talk.

Discrimination exists, under US law, based upon a number of criteria.  Some states have added additional criteria onto the initial federal wants.  As long as the form of discrimination. Any of those laws, it is not, by definition, discrimination.  It may be discriminatory. It may reflect ignorance, but it is not legally discrimination.

In this example, a person meets the paper requirements and we don't know whether this person displayed their knowledge poorly on the interview.  We are just going to look at what we know here.  This person believes that they were turned down based upon personality and a 2nd criteria.

Personality is not a discriminatory category under any criteria I've ever heard of.  Firms are allowed to evaluate people for "fit" as long as that doesn't fall into a discriminatory category.  For example, we don't think you fit in because we only hire men.  Another example would be your gay and we only hire heterosexuals.  And, of course you are black and we are white or your white or black.  What do you know about our culture without actually giving them a chance to demonstrate that in the course of the interview?  That would be clear discrimination based upon it. Personality… No.

Company Image?
I had a question based upon the phrase, "the company image."  They don't embody "the company image."  I'm wondering whether this is a question about weight and whether this person might be profoundly obese, for example.  In certain states, that behavior might qualify as discrimination.

Ultimately, you have to prove that was the criteria for being rejected by this organization.  That is a hard road to take.  In terms of weight, to my knowledge, an attorney would know this better, you can't use the excuse of, "No one at this firm is morbidly obese."  That's a term that I've heard used, to describe someone who was extremely overweight.  They are at the point of risking death by being that overweight.

Again, if you really believe that this is the case, consult an attorney and see what they have to say.  Find out what it would take to prove your case if the issue is about you being extremely overweight.  See if that would allow you to become a part of a "protected class" under state or federal law.  If you live in a bigger city, you might be protected under local law, as well, because those laws are added on top of the original federal law.

I'm sorry to be more specific, but I think this becomes a way to evaluate whether this is a case of discrimination and whether firms can do it.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

I’m Over 60. Should I Hide My Age? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/07/06/im-over-60-should-i-hide-my-age-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1156 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a job hunter about whether they should remove references to age in their resume.

Summary

I received a message this morning from someone with I phone interviewed last week who had a question for me. I thought this would apply to other people beyond him, so, I thought I would as a video, rather than just to write back to him. So, there is the question. For people over 60 and looking for a job, should we consider removing reference to age on the websites, my life etc. to better our chances of getting interviews?

I want to start this by saying that bigotry obviously exists but the particularly, ageism. So, let's recognize that, accept that and make firm squirm. That to me doesn't mean removing items from your resume based upon age, but I think in terms of relevance.

I'm 64 so when I think in terms of things that I did in 1971 when I graduated college or in 1972, this could probably be best put on a resume as a summary. So, as you look at your resume, look at relevance, rather than age as being the variable.

I would take of the year on the degree if I were you? Probably. But the truth of the matter is, what difference does it make? You are going to walk in the door, and are they are going to talk to you and they are going to say, “Gee! It’s an old guy,” if they are going to be bigoted.

If they aren’t going to be bigoted, they are going to look at you for your skills and experience and that's the firm that you want to work for. Why put yourself in the awkward situation? To me, it's always better to reveal and not do stupid interviews with people who are bigoted, rather than put myself in the position where I'm dragging myself to a location to talk to someone who is only can give me a courtesy interview because their biases are so profound that they're not going to listen.

Then, I’m going to have to work hard to last that long period of time and have no chance of getting hired.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

I’m Over 60. Should I Hide My Age? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1156 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a job hunter about whether they should remove references to age in their resume.

Summary

I received a message this morning from someone with I phone interviewed last week who had a question for me. I thought this would apply to other people beyond him, so, I thought I would as a video, rather than just to write back to him. So, there is the question. For people over 60 and looking for a job, should we consider removing reference to age on the websites, my life etc. to better our chances of getting interviews?

I want to start this by saying that bigotry obviously exists but the particularly, ageism. So, let's recognize that, accept that and make firm squirm. That to me doesn't mean removing items from your resume based upon age, but I think in terms of relevance.

I'm 64 so when I think in terms of things that I did in 1971 when I graduated college or in 1972, this could probably be best put on a resume as a summary. So, as you look at your resume, look at relevance, rather than age as being the variable.

I would take of the year on the degree if I were you? Probably. But the truth of the matter is, what difference does it make? You are going to walk in the door, and are they are going to talk to you and they are going to say, “Gee! It’s an old guy,” if they are going to be bigoted.

If they aren’t going to be bigoted, they are going to look at you for your skills and experience and that's the firm that you want to work for. Why put yourself in the awkward situation? To me, it's always better to reveal and not do stupid interviews with people who are bigoted, rather than put myself in the position where I'm dragging myself to a location to talk to someone who is only can give me a courtesy interview because their biases are so profound that they're not going to listen.

Then, I’m going to have to work hard to last that long period of time and have no chance of getting hired.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Job Search Radio

Why Do Recruiters Say You Are Overqualified When It’s An Ageist Remark? | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/11/29/why-do-recruiters-say-you-are-overqualified-when-its-an-ageist-remark/

EP 447 In most instances, is it really discrimination or something else? I answer this questions with No BS.

Summary

I thought today, I would answer someone's question that goes, "Why do recruiters say you are overqualified when it is an ageist remark?" Is it really an ageist remark? Let me break down the word "overqualified" because that's really the one that is at question. Does it translates into ageism or something else?

If you said to me this person is overqualified... I'm going to use one profession from a very general perspective. If you set accountant with 10 years of experience was overqualified and was competing for job as an accountant with 3 years of experience, I would scratch my head and say, "What? Are you kidding me?" Usually what happens is that the 10 year person has advanced past the staff level. As such, they are making more money and are doing a higher level role than what is being sought by the employer.

So it's not a question of ageism under those circumstances; what it is is a very clear statement, you have surpassed the requirements of the job , and are probably making more money than we are willing to pay. I used to run into this all the time when I was doing IT recruiting and someone would say, "But I can do that job!!"

"Yeah, but you are making hundred $50,000 per year in this position is paying $95,000 per year. "

"Can't they up the money?"

"No, they have a budget just like when you are going to a car dealer… You have got a budget and, as such, if you say to them, "Why are you showing this sports car to me when I'm only willing to pay $22,000 for a car? I can't afford that!" Is the same thing with an employer. It's not an issue of ageism. What it is is a situation where you have surpassed the requirements of the job.

The most common set of circumstances is a person who is currently a manager, a director who is willing to take the step back in order to find work at the staff level or a manager level (director to manager). They keep saying, "I can do that job! And I have done that job before!"

"But it has been a while since you have done in your income level has surpassed what they are willing to pay. So our experience tells us that when you are willing to take the $25,000 salary cut, but as soon as something better comes along, you are out the door." It's not ages; it's their experience talking the tells them, "You may think you can do the job, but you can't or you're just looking for too much money."

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

I’m Being Interviewed by Someone Much Younger! | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/11/20/im-being-interviewed-by-someone-much-younger–no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 932 The anniversary show AND I explain how to handle an interview situation where the hiring manager is much younger than you. 

Summary

I want to talk with you about age discrimination, 1 of the most common forms of discrimination in hiring.As a search professional, I hear the lament . . . And I've heard from the time when I was 1st entering the business was 20 years old . . . "I being discriminated against because of my age. I'm X number of years old I was interviewed by someone who is much younger than me. I said no chance of getting the job."

That may have been true. I also want to say that discrimination takes a whole host of forms , including your assumption that this person was going to discriminate against you and that the 20-year-old like I once was is being interviewed by the 45-year-old who thinks that in no way, shape or form does this person ever bring in the head. Discrimination takes a whole host of forms .

Be that as it may, you are the person who is my age (I'm in my 60s) interview by the person in their 30s or 40s. You have that feeling in the pit of your stomach that this interview is dead in the water before it even gets underway. I would just want to say to you that you may be wrong. You may actually be someone who they are really interested in for the very reason that you have the experience.

My advice he was really very simple. Make no assumptions. Walk in there and know that you may not get the job. You may not get the job NOT because of your age But because you did not perform well on the interviews. You may not demonstrate all the brilliance that you have and the experiences and template that you have in the course of your interview. That's not their fault; that's because you gave up proactively walking in the door.

Your goal when you walk in the door. In the example that I gave with the person who might be 20 or 30 years your junior is to make them fall in love with you, just like you would be trying to do if you're being interviewed by someone who is your own age.

Invariably, there are circumstances where the younger hiring manager asks the question that translates into, "can you take direction from me?" The correct answer is, "Of course. I've done it before. I've taken direction for people younger than I. Statistically, you must admit the probability is I'm always going to be working for someone younger than me. This was never an issue for me, but I've always recognize that people are concerned about it going in. I have no issue with it."

You can be just as casual in his blunt this I was in that answer. Also say that there is another variation on This where you can say, "I have no problems. As a matter of fact, I have worked with younger hiring managers before. At times, they appreciate that I have the experiences That I do because they see me as someone that they can come to for advice, who is not going to stick their noses in my business, allow them to make the mistakes, but is available as a resource if they need it."

Notice what you are doing you saying, "I can mentor, but I'm not going to push my mentoring on you."They can come to you as an advisor because you have certain experiences that may be of value to them. I don't answer is good. You can combine those answers for easily.

Again, my suggestions are always do the things that are comfortable for you and allow yourself to just be magnificent in the interview, even though you are concerned that this person is going to reject you because of your age.

Again, you may not be the person that they hire, but you may be the trailblazer makes it possible for the next person to get hired, all because of your performance. So, do a masterful job.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Ask Me Anything About Job Search | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

I am doing an experiment with Belive where I am doing an AMA and answering several questions:

Do recruiters read cover letters?

What is the typical word count for a good cover letter?

How do you efficiently reach out to individuals in charge of reviewing online job applications, especially in situations where the recruiter or HR personnel never replies to phone calls or emails?

How does a recruitment consultant focus on helping candidates find jobs? Most are focused on assisting companies find the right candidate. As a recruitment consultant, how can one assist a job seeker find his/her dream job?

How is it legal to recruit on the basis of gender for technical jobs such as copyediting or patenting?

 

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

JobSearchTV.com

I’m Being Interviewed by Someone Much Younger! | JobSearchTV.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to handle an interview situation where the hiring manager is much younger than you.

Summary

I want to talk with you about age discrimination, 1 of the most common forms of discrimination in hiring.As a search professional, I hear the lament . . . And I've heard from the time when I was 1st entering the business was 20 years old . . . "I being discriminated against because of my age. I'm X number of years old I was interviewed by someone who is much younger than me. I said no chance of getting the job."

That may have been true. I also want to say that discrimination takes a whole host of forms , including your assumption that this person was going to discriminate against you and that the 20-year-old like I once was is being interviewed by the 45-year-old who thinks that in no way, shape or form does this person ever bring in the head. Discrimination takes a whole host of forms .

Be that as it may, you are the person who is my age (I'm in my 60s) interview by the person in their 30s or 40s. You have that feeling in the pit of your stomach that this interview is dead in the water before it even gets underway. I would just want to say to you that you may be wrong. You may actually be someone who they are really interested in for the very reason that you have the experience.

My advice he was really very simple. Make no assumptions. Walk in there and know that you may not get the job. You may not get the job NOT because of your age But because you did not perform well on the interviews. You may not demonstrate all the brilliance that you have and the experiences and template that you have in the course of your interview. That's not their fault; that's because you gave up proactively walking in the door.

Your goal when you walk in the door. In the example that I gave with the person who might be 20 or 30 years your junior is to make them fall in love with you, just like you would be trying to do if you're being interviewed by someone who is your own age.

Invariably, there are circumstances where the younger hiring manager asks the question that translates into, "can you take direction from me?" The correct answer is, "Of course. I've done it before. I've taken direction for people younger than I. Statistically, you must admit the probability is I'm always going to be working for someone younger than me. This was never an issue for me, but I've always recognize that people are concerned about it going in. I have no issue with it."

You can be just as casual in his blunt this I was in that answer. Also say that there is another variation on This where you can say, "I have no problems. As a matter of fact, I have worked with younger hiring managers before. At times, they appreciate that I have the experiences That I do because they see me as someone that they can come to for advice, who is not going to stick their noses in my business, allow them to make the mistakes, but is available as a resource if they need it."

Notice what you are doing you saying, "I can mentor, but I'm not going to push my mentoring on you."They can come to you as an advisor because you have certain experiences that may be of value to them. I don't answer is good. You can combine those answers for easily.

Again, my suggestions are always do the things that are comfortable for you and allow yourself to just be magnificent in the interview, even though you are concerned that this person is going to reject you because of your age.

Again, you may not be the person that they hire, but you may be the trailblazer makes it possible for the next person to get hired, all because of your performance. So, do a masterful job.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Do You Think It’s Age Discrimination?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/28/job-search-radio-do-you-think-its-age-discrimination/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks to older workers about how to deal with age discrimination.

​Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!​​​