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The “Find The Heavier Ball” Brainteaser


You are given 12 balls, 11 are identical, one is heavier. How do you find the heavier ball in only 3 moves?

Summary

Here's the problem. You are given 12 balls and a scale. Of the 12 balls, 11 are identical and one way slightly more. How do you find the heavier ball amongst these 12 using the scale only 3 times.

Here's the solution.

Take 5 balls and 5 balls and weigh them. If the scales are equal, you can discard the 10 balls and just weigh the other 2 to get your answer. That would be the 2nd use of the scale, in which case you have found the heavier ball into moves.

If on the other hand, the 1st weighing of 5 and 5 balls, one group is heavier, then, of the heavier group, way too against 2 (that's the 2nd use of the scale) and if they weigh the same, the 5th ball is the one that you are looking for.

If 1 of the groups of 2 balls is heavier, then take the heavier group of 2 balls and weigh them against each other (that's the 3rd use of the scale) and you'll find the heavier ball is the one that you are looking for.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

The Missing Ingredient in Most Resumes | JobSearchTV.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the missing ingredient in too many resumes.

Summary

Today, I want to offer to you a job interview tip that I see time and again, no matter how much I tell people they forget to do. The reminder is that when you are an interview and you're being asked about something that you done, most people talk about the situation or off our answer to the question without offering an example.

Examples (please excuse example. I'm going to give) are like mayonnaise to tuna in a sandwich. It's the thing that blends everything together to give it all a great flavor.

When you are interviewing, don't neglect great examples because they really give sustenance and texture and flavor to the story, different than simply reciting facts.

For example, if I were to talk about my background what I did recruiting, if I talk about the tasks of the day, it would certainly cause your eyes to glaze over within 5 minutes. However, if I talked about some of the difficult interviews I've conducted, some of the difficult situations of have to contend with involving job applicants who are just acting irrationally or institutional customers who are acting irrationally, how I handle the situations to bring both parties together so they might live happily ever after for many many years with one another would give you a better idea of what I used to do.

Don't neglect examples. Always use them in interviewing. Practice them in advance so that you are comfortable with them. Time and again, you will find that your interviews will thrive as a result.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Tough Interview Questions: Do You Take Work Home With You? | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a quick, direct, no BS way to answer this question.

Summary

Let's go right to 1 of those tough interview questions that are designed to make it seemed foolish. Ready.? Most of these questions like it's not that difficult, but there is a mistake people make. I get to that in a second. Here is the question.

So, do you take work home with you? Tell us! Tell me! Hurry!

And it's all designed to exert a certain amount of pressure on you. At this point, when most people answer the question, they drone on and on and they give this lengthy answer. They give examples. They talk about stuff. They bore the other person when a simple, concise answer would really work much better than a lengthy one.

Here is a simple, concise answer. “I want you use you know I understand the importance of deadlines and deliverables and, him the fact of the matter is, there are times when you have to take work home with you to meet those deadlines. So, yes, of course, I do that. But in terms of a steady requirement, most of my work hasn't really required this as a steady thing. Do I do it as needed? Absolutely.”

So, I see this is the easiest way to do it – – short, simple, to the point. Don’t going into long stories. Don't tell about this time in “04 when , you took work home with you and how it rescued everyone. Just give me a straight, no BS answer that says, “Sure, I understand that there are times when deadlines are tight and you take work home with you . . . But etc.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a Jeff Altman, The Big Game Huntercommunity for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Tell Me Something You’ve Learned from Non-Work Related Experiences | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a framework for how to use for this question.

Summary

I’m Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. I and referred to as The Big Game Hunter because I hunted leaders and there staff for organizations for more than 40 years.

Let's talk about 1 of those tough interview questions that causes people to sweat bullets, become all nervous and none of them are particularly hard. My thinking is that it might be useful prepare for everything, to hear some the questions, get some ideas of answers, do it in your particular way, but try to work within the framework I am going to offer

So, today's tough question is, “So, tell me what you might've learned from 1 of your non-work experiences that you think is helping you?”

So, this is an invitation to talk about volunteerism that you are involved with. So the ideal way to the frame your answer is, if you are in management, you want to talk about not managing, but just doing and being reminded of how people think from “the doer perspective” and thus how it affects you favorably when you're leading.

If you are a staff level individual and you have an opportunity to lead, it's in appreciation for the effort that goes into leadership. So, the idea is to flip the 2 situations around.

Again, as an is a manager and above, the reminder of what it's like to be a doer. As a doer, you want to then to talk about the things that you learn about being a manager, a director . . . Being In some sort of leadership role that you normally haven't gotten yet at work and are aspiring to.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

What’s the Best Question to Ask at the End of an Interview? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/05/08/whats-the-best-question-to-ask-at-the-end-of-an-interview

EP 739 Answering a Facebook follower’s questions

Summary

I've referred to the single Best question you should ask on any interview and I did a Google hangout about it some time ago.The image isn't all that good (it was 1 of my 1st hangouts) so I decide to we do that video here.

What is the single Best question you should ask on any interview and when should you ask? Real simple. Let me start off with what the typical interview seems like. It starts with them going, "Tell me about yourself." Then you do. And then you play interview karate for a while. They throw up a question that you that feels like a punch and you have to block it away. They throw another one about you and you have to use I a hip check to throw them over your shoulder. Back and forth and back and forth..

If you are in a profession where there in-depth questions that could be asked, they will get to that until finally they will say, "So, do you have any questions for us?" You say, "Tell me about the job.." They do that.. You do that and say, "That's interesting!" They say, "Great! Will get back to you." That's the typical interview.

Let me tell you what the single Best question is and when to ask it. You walk in and sit down and as you lower your butt into the chair, Before they have a chance to speak, you say, "I appreciate that you made time to meet with me today. I reviewed the position description and it was really interesting to me. But I want to get your take on the job. Could you tell me about the position as you see it and what I can do to help?"

BOING!

What that does is, instead of waiting until the end of the interview to ask them about the job, you do it at the beginning of the interview before they get role in.. You do that because, at the end of the interview, there is really nothing that you can do with that information. But sometimes, even if you see the job description, they've often changed it a little bit, Your thoughts have morphed, they start looking at it differently and they've never change the formal requirements. So even if you got this description from a recruiter, it may be slightly different or even wrong.

Thus by asking this question,, "I took a look at the job description and was really interesting to me,, but I want to get your take on the job. Could you tell me about the position as you see it and what I can do to help you?" You get the information at the beginning when you can use it. Thus, every time they are asking you a question, you want to tailor your answer to what matters to them and not just talk about what you've done, but talk about what you've done that relates to what they are looking for from you.

This gives you a huge advantage from your competition which is sitting there like lumps waiting until the end to ask about the job. Now, you get this information at the beginning when you can use it.

Ah! There is one small problem. Now that you can't ask about the job at the end, you need to be prepared with questions to replace the one about the job, right? Here's what you do.

When they ask you, "So, do you have any questions for us here," you say, "The job seems great to me. I'm really interested. I do have a few questions. Is my 1st question: let's say I join, what would your expectations be, what would I be doing over the 1st 30, 60 and 90 days after I join?"

If you find out there are unreasonable expectations, isn't it better for you to know before you join? That's one question you can ask.

Here's the 2nd one that I have also shared in another video and podcast. "Let's say I join and it is a year from now. I have a just done a good job, It's been the best, or at least 1 of the best you have seen someone perform. What what I've accomplished during that year that would cause you to write such a review?"

BOING!

Right off the bat, It lets them know that you are interested in doing great work, not average work. Again, it's giving them an idea of you AND it's giving you the idea of what you are going to be doing over that 1st year that would cause you to be extraordinary employee.

It's a great question. I hope you like it. I hope you use these your interviews.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

The Five Question Salary Negotiation | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/22/the-five-question-salary-negotiation-2/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to negotiate your job offer with just five questions.

Summary

Let's talk about negotiating salary. You've got the offer. Everything seems great but you want to do a bit more negotiating. Here is the 1st thing you do: if you feel comfortable about what is been proposed but you just want to increase a little bit, here's the idea.

You'll be asking a few questions but I don't want you doing it right away. I want you to say, "I'm thinking favorably. Can I come back to you in a day or so to have a couple of questions answered. I just want to make sure I do this 1 time so that were not going back and forth. He give me a day here to think about it and circle back to you?"

Think of it from the hiring manager's perspective. He or she thinks right away that you're going to be coming back about money. As a result, when you come back to them, the 1st question that you ask is NOT about money. It should be about anything BUT money.

Consider asking when you get into the 401(k). When you become eligible for benefits. Something softball that will cause them to relax a little bit and think for a 2nd, "Ah! This isn't going to be so tough!" Then, the next question is going to be about reporting relationships. Who are you going to report to? What are they like? If I'm reporting to you, who do you report to? Who do we service? Things along those lines.

The 3rd question is always a big one. You want to go to your most important question 3rd. I prefer you not deal with money here and keep that for a little bit later in the conversation. Here, you might ask about whatever your critical issue is. Maybe, is that you will be taking a trip and it is prescheduled and you want them to know about it in advance. Maybe it is about bonus eligibility... Whatever it is, covered 3rd.

Then, you circle back and asked him another softball question. Do I work on a Windows device or Mac? Isn't that a softball question?

Now, for the money question, you have been building up to this one, see would say something like, "You know, I've been really thinking favorably about this opportunity. Could you do a touch better on the offer?" Normally, they will do 1 of 2 things; they will either increase it by a few dollars. The 2nd thing they might say is, "This really is our top number." You'll be able to tell if it's true by the sincerity of their voice. Whether that is true or not. You'll be able to use your "acute BS detector" to determine if that is the case. The 3rd response is to say, "I will have to get back to you. Is that a deal breaker for you?"

You can say no or yes; that will be your choice. Ultimately, if this is a dealbreaker for you, he or she is going to work that much harder to get the number or or say, "Forget it." It is all over at that point.

Assuming that it is not a dealbreaker, tell them that at the point. You're interested in joining, other firms been talking about more money with you, you have another offer at that price point, could they do a touch better?

That's the theory behind what I call, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself." That's 1 of my YouTube videos. Watch it. It is about 10 minutes in length, and I think it is very helpful.

But I wanted to stage salary negotiation for you here. Kudos to my friend Ellis Chase. He did this in a Forbes article very well. If you go to Forbes and search for Ellis Chase, he lays out this formula nicely,

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Email me at [email protected]
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

JobSearchTV.com

Tough Interview Questions: Tell Me About a Time You Were Treated Unfairly | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

This is a great trap question that employers use and I tell you how to avoid falling into the trap and what they are really looking for.

Summary

This question is going to sound like 1 of those questions a makes you scratch your head and wonder why they are asking it. "Tell me about a time you were treated unfairly. Or unjustly." I want to stick with "unfairly," because it is a simpler way of expressing it that most people can relate to.

What is an employer really looking for here? The fact of the matter is if they're using this question well, they are going to goad you into presenting yourself as being persecuted as being treated badly, and encouraging you to really give them a juicy description of what happened and how bad it was, and how horrible. They will say things like, "That's awful.." Or, "Really," or, "Wow!" And in doing so, they are going to instigate you into saying more.

That's the sucker move.

What they are really looking for is how you took ownership of the situation. Again, this is a question about ownership. This isn't about vomiting some deep-seated resentment of your life. Follow that? It isn't about vomiting deep-seated resentment, it is about how you took ownership of the situation.

Ownership can take a variety of different forms. For example, I remember one instance in my case where I set for the panel was evaluated and I thought I was treated very badly. They changed the rules of the game on but didn't tell me so I way with one expectation; they went with a completely different one that they didn't tell me about, at the end, I felt very frustrated and angry and hurt because I felt betrayed.

If I left the story at that point, I should be rejected because what they are looking for is someone who takes ownership. However, if I continue the story by saying, "Afterwards, there were a number of people who had the same experience. We got together and created a panel they made recommendations for a new process that panels could use to evaluate candidates.. From that, we developed a model that is still used to this day." You follow what I'm doing here?

It isn't the story, but what you did with the story that's important to the employer. Or what you learned from the experience at the most important part 2 what you relate.

To summarize, if you stick the feeling of persecution or being treated unfairly, you lose. If you convert the story into one that talks about how you use this experience to change process or change an organization or change the world, or do something, or what you learned from this experience that you apply even to this day, then you win.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Beef Up Your Use of This Feature on LinkedIn | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to increase your use of this one feature on LinkedIn for great results.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about 1 of those features on LinkedIn that is ridiculously underutilized, that people you need to do a far better job of presenting themselves with.

Most of you know about endorsements, that way that you help a friend or former colleague or current colic without one click method of saying, "They are real good at…" Whatever it is that your clicking about. But there is a better way, one that is for more benefit for most of you than that one click endorsement. That is by writing recommendations.

Recommendations are that long description we talk about how someone did something extraordinary that makes them stand out from the average. I'm not talking about writing the fluffy piece that says, "She's a really good gal!" Or, "He's a really good guy!" Those are useless and stupid. If you get too many of them on your profile, will they do is waste people's time and suggest that you don't know crap.

Instead, get some texture. Even go so 1st to suggest people what they might write about. A couple of recommendations about the same subject, suddenly, that recommendation becomes a point of discussion on your interviews.

"What happened there?"

"What is it that so many people rallied around this point?"

Get recommendations. Before they go live on your page, you will have to approve them so that if someone says something dumb, or inconsequential, or obnoxious like that. "Really good guy," I mentioned before, you can ask them to rewrite it and specify what you want.

Here's one other thing in the subject of recommendations. There are more people now deciding NOT to be involved on LinkedIn. They are just dropping out altogether. It's foolish, but it is their prerogative. Maybe they never joined. Maybe they don't think they needed. Whatever the reason is is true of some people. What can you do instead?

Get a recommendation from them and put in hundred media. By doing that, you're able to get this testimonial in from someone who is saying wonderful things about you and not force them to be back on LinkedIn.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

JobSearchTV.com

Over 50? Over 60?: Your Unique Job Search Problems & How to Solve Them | JobSearchTV.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/10/26/over-50-over-60-your-unique-job-search-problems-how-to-solve-them/

EP 420 ​I discuss a few unique issues that relate to you and your job search.

Summary

This is a video for those of you who are older workers. If you look at my face, you know I'm not a beginner either. .

So, I just want to start off by saying there are unique issues that come with being an older work. Yes, ageism is an issue, but a lot of the issues that job hunters have who are over 50 (and certainly over 60) relate to the fact that a lot of you have gotten sloppy about so much, you don't really feel like doing it, and it oozes out of your pores.

You don't have the same drive. You don't have the same determination. Frankly, you don't put in smart effort in order to find work. So, yes, I am going to blame the victim here because at the end of the day, you are responsible for all of your outcomes. You can blame ageism to your hearts content, but you still need to find the position.

There is a way that you can short-circuit all of this and that is to start a business, to become a consultant, because, in the case of business owners, in the case of consultants who are operating at a high level like interim roles, looking to be in an interim C level executive for organization, experience is valued.

So, you were brought in in order to be the pro, to do it for a fixed period of time and then leave. So adopting those kind of positions, whether it's starting a business or being an interim exec for a role is a way of short-circuiting the process. .

However, some of the same pointers still apply even to you. And the 1st 2 are kind of linked.

Number 1 is stay fit. I will speak for myself. It's been hard to take off weight period it's been hard to look good. I have gotten fat. I have clothes that the fit me extremely well and a lot of people I talked to don’t. So, I'm at the gym regularly I (right now, I am getting over and injury but still I'm at the gym regularly working out). I sweat. I lift weights. I push myself. You need to do stuff like that plus have your wardrobe do things that call attention to you from a positive perspective, that don’t give people a reason to go, “How old is that that outfit he's wearing? Or, is she wearing something that is from the 70s?”

You know how people are? They get so dismissive. If you don't believe me get on Facebook, again, and take a look at some of the things that people post that are so snarky. So, just be aware of your appearance because that has an effect.

Another thing is practice your skills. Do it at home. You just make the effort to make sure that you don't get sloppy with how you present your knowledge. So, a lot of people I know have been doing their job for so long and so well that they don't have to talk about it well. And they get lazy with. What I will call, “current events,” within their field. You talk to someone 20 years younger than you, it rolls off the tongue so smoothly.. It may not happen that way for you if you practice.

You might also consider, in your presentation, without of alluding to your age by talking about the grandkids, for example. You can talk about the benefits of maturity and your life experience in supporting the lead person or providing access to certain skills and life experiences that a younger worker hasn’t.

You have been there, you've done a lot. It doesn't make you burned out or tired. But what it does do is help you avoid some of the problems, the less experienced worker might not know., So, emphasize some of those attributes when your interview.

I also want to mention networking. Networking is extremely important for you in the value of your network is far greater than the younger workers network. You know senior executives. You know people who are in a position to hire and who can introduce you to other people who can introduce you to roles. So, get out there and talk to people that you know and don't just sit back on your laurels.

The last thing is the tendency that the those of you who are 50 and over have not to take as many interviews. I want to encourage, especially when you 1st getting back in the job search, get out there and take more interviews, even if it's a job that you would never take, even if the commute is too far, because you are going to need some practice. Even if you been a role where you have hired, now you are the other side of the desk period you need to put yourself in the position to practice interviewing so that you don't screw up jobs that really matter.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

What’s The Best Question to Ask on an Interview? Why? | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

There really is a “best question to ask” on every job interview you go on.

Summary

I've referred to the single Best question you should ask on any interview and I did a Google hangout about it some time ago.The image isn't all that good (it was 1 of my 1st hangouts) so I decide to we do that video here.

What is the single Best question you should ask on any interview and when should you ask? Real simple. Let me start off with what the typical interview seems like. It starts with them going, "Tell me about yourself." Then you do. And then you play interview karate for a while. They throw up a question that you that feels like a punch and you have to block it away. They throw another one about you and you have to use I a hip check to throw them over your shoulder. Back and forth and back and forth..

If you are in a profession where there in-depth questions that could be asked, they will get to that until finally they will say, "So, do you have any questions for us?" You say, "Tell me about the job.." They do that.. You do that and say, "That's interesting!" They say, "Great! Will get back to you." That's the typical interview.

Let me tell you what the single Best question is and when to ask it. You walk in and sit down and as you lower your butt into the chair, Before they have a chance to speak, you say, "I appreciate that you made time to meet with me today. I reviewed the position description and it was really interesting to me. But I want to get your take on the job. Could you tell me about the position as you see it and what I can do to help?"

BOING!

What that does is, instead of waiting until the end of the interview to ask them about the job, you do it at the beginning of the interview before they get role in.. You do that because, at the end of the interview, there is really nothing that you can do with that information. But sometimes, even if you see the job description, they've often changed it a little bit, Your thoughts have morphed, they start looking at it differently and they've never change the formal requirements. So even if you got this description from a recruiter, it may be slightly different or even wrong.

Thus by asking this question,, "I took a look at the job description and was really interesting to me,, but I want to get your take on the job. Could you tell me about the position as you see it and what I can do to help you?" You get the information at the beginning when you can use it. Thus, every time they are asking you a question, you want to tailor your answer to what matters to them and not just talk about what you've done, but talk about what you've done that relates to what they are looking for from you.

This gives you a huge advantage from your competition which is sitting there like lumps waiting until the end to ask about the job. Now, you get this information at the beginning when you can use it.

Ah! There is one small problem. Now that you can't ask about the job at the end, you need to be prepared with questions to replace the one about the job, right? Here's what you do.

When they ask you, "So, do you have any questions for us here," you say, "The job seems great to me. I'm really interested. I do have a few questions. Is my 1st question: let's say I join, what would your expectations be, what would I be doing over the 1st 30, 60 and 90 days after I join?"

If you find out there are unreasonable expectations, isn't it better for you to know before you join? That's one question you can ask.

Here's the 2nd one that I have also shared in another video and podcast. "Let's say I join and it is a year from now. I have a just done a good job, It's been the best, or at least 1 of the best you have seen someone perform. What what I've accomplished during that year that would cause you to write such a review?"

BOING!

Right off the bat, It lets them know that you are interested in doing great work, not average work. Again, it's giving them an idea of you AND it's giving you the idea of what you are going to be doing over that 1st year that would cause you to be extraordinary employee.

It's a great question. I hope you like it. I hope you use these your interviews.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

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