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NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

What to Do When The Recruiter Calls | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/12/13/what-to-do-when-the-recruiter-calls-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1314 Here’s what to do if one calls you.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Employer Interviewing Mistakes: Not Seeing People for Who They Are | No BS Hiring Advice


I discuss one of the classic mistakes hiring managers make.

Summary

This is a video in a series that I've been doing about employer interviewing and hiring mistakes and the mistake I'm going to talk with you about is not seeing people for who they really are. That's the influence of bias, both positive and negative bias.
The person who walks in the door, who is . . . I'm going to use bad slang here . . . Drop-dead gorgeous . . . That's male or female. You see them and they are so impressive for their appearance that you go through the questions and . . . Excuse my language . . . Half-assed kind of way and, instead are mesmerized by how good-looking they are.
Conversely, you can also be adversely affected and have a bias toward people who are fat, who looks different than you, dresses poorly because they can't afford a better wardrobe, individuals of all different races, religions, backgrounds . . . And you can justify your decision based upon objective criteria . . . But, if you ask yourself the question, "if this person were drop-dead gorgeous walking in the in the door, would I give them a second chance," if you're honest with yourself, you probably would.
Let me go to the example of the person who's different than you and you perceive them negatively. You have to put your biases aside. You know, this person could be a great intellect, a dedicated individual. You want to hire a team player.? There is no more team player than this individual . . . But you're distracted because of their girth. Why is that? Because you have to get them a bigger chair? So, what? The firm can afford it. If this person is of a different religion or race than you, get to the intellect, get to their knowledge. Understand what makes them tick.
Instead of asking them to tell you about themselves, instead ask the this question instead. "So, as you look back at your life, what brought you to this moment? What was what's your background that had you enter this field and wind up in my office today?"
What you're going to do is learn about the individual and their life holistically. I've spoken about this in another video based upon a podcast called, "Reply All," that was released and made this suggestion then because it makes a lot of sense.
You know, there are things about a person and their life that you'll find out by asking them my question or the question was offered on "Reply All," instead of tell me about yourself. You'll find out about what brought them to this point.
What their training was. What their education is. How they wound up and being the first in their family to have this experience or how they stumbled into this career, but it got adopted by someone who trained the heck out of them.
I remember there's a guy in New York I met many years ago who used to adopt . . . I'm putting that in air quotes . . .A number of young Inner city kids and train the heck out of them in network engineering. He had a data center in his brownstone and would bring the kids in and train the heck out of them. They would work for him for nothing because they loved the education that they got and they all went on to great fields.
Did any of them have a comp sci degree? No. None of them even had degrees . . . But if you look at their resume you'd go, "where have they been working? No degree. Delete."
But you'd find out if you actually talked to them about how they were involved with providing communications to the Baltic Nations at times when the Soviet Union, the old Soviet Union was trying to block them from being able to have international communications or how each of them broke the networking blockades that existed on their banking systems that the old Soviets had Implemented and what their part of it was. You'd never know that unless you actually talk to them and asked the question like the one I'm suggesting.
So, take the time to get to know someone. Don't just simply respond impulsively and reflexively which basically involves no thought. It's a conditioned learning response that's keeping you from getting the person that you really want and need.
So, get out there. Experiment a little bit. If I'm wrong from your vantage point, no harm. no foul, right? No one gets hurt. You're still going to get the same information and you may still reject them, but following my lead here, you're going to learn a lot more about a person and their background and see really from that story much better than you'll find through your standard questions about fit

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

No BS Hiring Advice

Stop Screwing People | No BS Hiring Advice


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter delivers tough love about a situation that happens much too often.

Summary

I've always been a big believer that everyone in an organization has to get on the same page immediately about what they're looking for when they're hiring. That's all the people in the department when they're trying to interview, what's communicated to HR, the job requirement. Everyone has to be on board. Let me just tell you about something that happened to me this week (NOTE: I no longer do recruiting)
I was contacted by a firm to fill four positions. Great! I love this! Two obscure technologies. Okay, I do this all the time. I love working on obscure technologies. So, I find four people for the jobs to start off. I knew one wasn't right and it was a test that scenario and then, I told them that, and they respond back say, " this person isn't right for that reason, " They'll find I had assessed the properly. I should replace that person with another. So, I now have four people for four jobs. All, I'm looking for at this point is constructive feedback.
They talk to one person. "This person is terrific. I want to get him back to meet and to talk to so-and-so person who was overseas on a trip.” Couldn't do it. They tried to sell substitute someone else in the interview process. That person wound up not making themselves available. It's now a week later for this person for this person they were excited about. I emailed the HR person. I reached her yesterday. This is what I hear. They are rethinking the jobs and what they really need.
Okay. This is from beginning to end, this is 10 days, by the way. 10 days and they are re-thinking it. Why wasn’t it thought through the beginning? Why wasn't everyone on board with what was being looked for at the beginning? Now, this is one of the things that makes me, as a recruiter nuts is, on your side, when you do things that are helter-skelter and you lurch this way and then you go, "stop," and I'm expected to be happy about this because I've invested time and effort and resources (which is money, by the way), into working on something and then you're going, "Stop!"
All I want is a clear picture of what you're looking for. Now. I've got to imagine this from the job hunter's perspective. "We love him. We love him. We got to talk to him! We've got to talk to him. Oh, he's terrific! This guy's going to wrap up so quickly," and then it's a week later from when the substitute interviewer couldn't make themselves available.
So, just recognize the impact that your behavior on everyone in this process. Now, you can rationalize this away till you're blue in the face. There's no excuse for It. If I went to you and said and handed you a resume of someone that you thought was perfect and then I can't produce them, you'd be angry at me, right? And rightly, so. I wouldn't have done my job properly. Well, the fact is you haven't done your job properly.

So, I just want to encourage you, before you give out requirements, before you start interviewing, get on the same page. This isn't about changing your mind midstream. In this example, it's 10 days in. This could have been all solved before hand instead of wasting people's time. Don't waste time. Don't waste others time. You're screwing them

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Is It Normal For a Recruiter To Ask About Salary When I Am Not Looking for a Job? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/30/is-it-normal-for-a-recruiter-to-ask-about-salary-when-i-am-not-looking-for-a-job

EP 1301 The search firm is on the phone pushing me about my current compensation and I am not looking for a job. Is this normal?

Summary

"Is it normal to get a call from a recruiter for questions about current and previous salaries while I'm explaining that I am not looking for a move?"

The answer is, "Yes." However, let me dissect what is going on. They are trying to fill a position; they are sourcing for job. They are trying to find someone with a particular background. Here's what they've got. They have a job description or yellowing from the client about what they are looking for., Including prices that they're willing to pay for this talent.

You are saying, "I'm not interested," but, they are doing 1 of 2 things. There going to try to convince you, because your salary is much lower in there going to try to persuade you with money OR if you are interrupting them and saying, "I'm not interested," there trying to build a database of that they have an idea of what price point you are at for the future. In this way, they can recontact you when they have something that makes sense.

The 1st scenario is the more likely one. That's when they are trying to find out whether they can talk with you about salary, can the persuade you with money, even though you are not interested.

For example, you're making $100,000 per year, $125,000 per year... Whatever it is and they say to you, "This is a position that will pay between $110,000 and $125,000," on the 1st scenario. Or you are at $125,000 and they will say, "this is a position that can get you to $140,000 per year, maybe $150,000 a year PLUS BONUS!!!" Is just so much money in there . They're just trying to break down your defenses.

Yes, it is normal, because most recruiters, at least in the contingency business, not in executive search, what they are trying to do most of the time is break you down in 2 ways. Number 1 is money. Number 2 is opportunity. "I have a career opportunity where my client is looking for a rockstar to work for them and do magical things." I'm being goofy there, but that's what most of the sales pitches come down to.

So, yes, it is normal. Yes, it is very much part of the repertoire of recruiters. No, you don't need to comply. I am going to repeat that. No, you don't need to comply. BUT, the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those a great qualities to have). People get ahead by being alert to opportunities and not falling for company pablum that wears them down and get them stuck in the job that they say they are happy at until one day someone calls out to them and says, "Hey, Charlie, come here. Meet us in the conference room." And in the fire you. When the economy goes south.

You are the chairman of the board of your organization. In my case, it would be The Altman Organization. Thus, I am responsible for me and you have to think about the chairman of your organization, as well. If you are a compliant, meek little nice person working for a company, you are going to lose out and eventually, your employer is going to spit you out.

Don't believe me? Look at what happened to millions of people just in the United States between 2008 and 2010. Look out for yourself. Don't just pause and go, "hey, I am in a good job. This is a good job. I like my good job." Maybe there is a better one. Listen. Be smart. If you listen and then decide,. "This is not for me," maybe the commute is to longer the money isn't right, I can't do it right now. We've got this trip that we are planning, whatever the reason is don't do it.

But, be smart and listen. Then make the decision.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice

Using Video at the Time of Application | No BS HIring Advice Radio


Jeff Altman,The Big Game Hunter discusses using video at the time a job hunter applies to your firm.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about video interviewing and suggest an idea to you that I think might be worth exploring in your budget.
Now. It comes from an interview. I did with someone named Chip Luman, who's a founder of a company called HireVue. I want to be clear, I'm not a paid spokesperson. I'm not compensated in any way for this video and you can check out any number of competing products to theirs.
But, the idea that I liked about the approach his firm was taking starts off with, number one, what's called asymmetrical interviews. That is, you have a candidate that you're interested in or wants to apply to your job . . . That's the better scenario. . . . They want to apply to your job. You provide them with a video link with a series of questions to answer that they can handle at the time of application.
Why is this so worthwhile? Because it cuts through a lot of the noise. A lot of people won't do it because they suddenly realize they're not qualified. Number two is it standardizes the base interview so, this way, your firm can't be accused of bias unless they're bigoted questions, of course, but because the interviews are standardized, there becomes a way that everyone's ask the same question.
Different people in your organization can watch the results and get a better feel for the person and their knowledge plus, from the job hunter perspective, they can do it at their convenience using a smartphone like this one. So, what it allows you to do is get what you need in the way of information faster and earlier than most because you don't have to go through the back and forth of the scheduling of the initial phone interview because you're getting basic information right away that allows you to discern whether or not people are a fit.
Now, again, if someone in your organization is going to look at all the resumes of a person with one ethnic background and rule them out, you obviously have a problem. But if you set up a system that allows you to have different people reviewing all the videos that you'll receive, the videos going to have 30 seconds answers. Like, there's another service that I'm trying out now called CandidateBroker. Person sees the job description. They apply. You can set up a period of time where they can wind up answering questions at the time of application that I can watch and get a feel for whether or not the person is qualified.
Nice systems. Saves time. Yes, there's going to be some expense for each of them but ,at the end of the day. You'll have some cost savings and, I know in the case of hirevue, they have an analytics system that will analyze the video responses based upon the backgrounds and the answers the people in your organization, give or successful hires have given, discern whether or not someone is worth talking to. A nice little feature.

So, explore some of the services that are out there. Doing video interviewing of employees at the time of application. I think you'll find its an interesting idea and will be a big money saver.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

 

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Is It OK To Email Several Recruiters About The Same Job? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/12/01/is-it-ok-to-email-several-recruiters-about-the-same-job

EP 1302 Well, it depends . . .

Summary

The question is, "is it okay to email several recruiters about the same job?" As usual, the answer is, "It depends."

It depends on whether you know for sure that they are all represented the same job. If the language is identical, DUH! It's the same job. The question then becomes,, "Why would you do that?"

Let's say you email the corporate recruiter and then you start emailing agencies. The corporate recruiters reclaim ownership of your candidacy. They are not going to accept the referral. There's no point in doing it UNLESS you. Let a few days go by so. It is not fresh in. their mind that they might've received the resume. You may not be in their applicant tracking system yet. Contacting a third party recruiter at that point makes sense. So, give you 3 days. If you haven't heard from you corporate recruiter, contact an agency recruiter.

Next. Multiple agency recruiters. "Applying" is 1 of those ambiguous terms doesn't mean that you send your resume to someone? Yes, it is okay to do that. The next question becomes that is soon as you start talking to 1 of the recruiters determine if they are going to submit you. If they are, there is no need for the others. If they aren't, ask why and, if another recruiter contacts you, very simply, you haven't been submitted yet, go ahead! Talk to a 2nd recruiter about it or a third. It doesn't mean you are going to get the interview.

What it does mean is that the 1st person said, "No," the 2nd person may have also said, "No," you may not fit. What are you hitting your head against the wall for?

If you legitimately fit, it begs the question, what did they not see your background or and how you presented yourself that cause them to think you did not fit? You have to learn from them from interview 1 to interview 2 and if you still haven't gotten the message yet, you certainly have to do it by interview 3.

Recognize that if you are not selling yourself properly to the 1st person, yes, you should be speaking to a 2nd. If you're not selling yourself well by interview 2, you better do it by interview 3 because what are you doing??? This is what my site, JobSearchCoachingHQ.com does. It really helps to prepare you for interviewing. It helps with resumes. It helps launch your search. It helps you with interviewing. It helps you with tough interview questions to prepare for. It helps with talking to recruiters. On and on and on those great content available to you at the site. So, I would encourage you that if you are struggling trying to figure out what you are doing wrong, number 1, joint. Number 2 is asked me once you have joined.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

How Honest Should You Be? | JobSearchTV.com

You’ve had a first interview with the corporate recruiter, the head of HR, and the hiring manager. The recruiter says, “call me tomorrow and tell me what you think.” How honest should you be?

Summary

Here's the situation. You've had a first interview with a firm. You met with a recruiter. Head of HR. Head of an enormous business unit .Celebrity individual. Recruiter says, " give me a call tomorrow at two o'clock. Tell me what you think." How honest should you be? How honest should you be with your questions or concerns ?How honest should you be with your reservations? How honest after a first round? Here's what I told someone.
Not at all .Speak about the challenges. Speak about the opportunities that your C. Speak about your excitement. You see, the recruiter is trying to filter out people early in the process and you really don't know enough to make a decision on your side.
Now, after the second round, if this comes up, then it's a little bit different .You speak about, not concerns, but questions that you have. Not big dramatic ones, but some of the questions you have that need to be addressed. Everything you say to the corporate recruiter is going to get funneled back to the to the hiring manager who's going to ultimately say, "you know, this person sounds like they would be too big of a problem. Let's pass." And you knocked yourself out.
The corporate or agency recruiter is not your ally here. On the corporate side, they are looking for "knockout factors. "On the third party recruiter side, you know, they're going to try and manipulate you to ignore your doubts and ignore your question marks and poopoo them or say stuff that may or may not be true. More likely not true than true.
They're going to speak about their knowledge of the firm. Have they ever worked there? Probably not. They are going to speak of their knowledge of the hiring manager. Have they ever worked for that manager? No.So, even with the good party recruiter, you have to operate witha degree of distrust because they're blowing smoke at you because if you voice too many negatives, they're seeing dollar signs flying off into the sunset.
So, understand when you're talking to recruiters ,both corporate and third party, after the first interview, who are checking your pulse, that's not the time to develop "an honesty. gene."
Think in terms of always promoting yourself. You're always selling yourself. You can always say no later on but, for now, go further.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

How Do You Spot a Bad Recruiter? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/19/how-do-you-spot-a-bad-recruiter-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

An easy question with a complicated answer.

Summary

The question for today is, "How do you spot a bad recruiter?" I think it's a wonderful question, but, I'm not going to give you the answer that you expect.

Here's what my thinking is. Most of you think that a bad recruiter is someone who doesn't get a job for you. You think a bad recruiter is someone who doesn't find you work. As a matter of fact, they may never arrange for an interview for you.

The problem with that is you are confused about what a recruiter is supposed to do. You make the mistake of thinking that recruiters work for you when, in fact, recruiters are paid by employers, not paid to find positions for someone.

I read an answer on Quora. I want to acknowledge it and poke holes in it. It starts off, "From the beginning when you get a first email message from a recruiter, skim to the bottom. Was it written to you. If you could change the name of the top and so the 200s of people… That's the sign of a bad recruiter!"

No. That's an indication that they are casting a wide net. They don't know if you're going to be interested. As a matter of fact, most people will never respond. It's not that they send out bulk email (because in some way, shape or form, you pay contact with them in the past). They have a database that lets them know that one time, when you are in touch with them in the past, you did similar work to what was being sought by the client.

They are presenting an opportunity. You have to accept that opportunity. That's fine.

"They use buzzwords and pick up lines. Bad recruiters have conversations where they use buzzwords and weak pickup lines."

I have no idea what this person means by, "weak pickup lines." They are obviously being sarcastic. However, buzzwords may reflect technology and functionality within a particular profession that a client may require. You have to find out whether the person has those skills pretty quickly in order to see if you are wasting your time and theirs.

"They don't understand its structure of an interview. They ask questions out of left field that seem like they are out of order."

No. Something may have popped into their mind that they forgot to cover. I'm a human being. I do make mistakes. I do forget they ask certain things. If you think, bad recruiter, having filled more than 1200 positions plus consulting assignments, having gone 1500+ YouTube videos on job search, having done three podcasts and a whole host of things because I have something that didn't seem like was in the right sequence for you, how do you feel if someone criticize you for that in your work?

I'm imperfect being. So are you. Give me a break. Don't expect perfection.

"Hard sell." That might be the side of a bad recruiter. I'm going to conceive that point. Some people sell hard. If the reason that they are selling hard is because you changed your story will beg, well, excuse me!

There is an inconsistency that you have not communicated, you've changed your mind, we've gone to bat (as you must realize, contingency recruiters are only paid it if you are hired and remain in the employ of the client for certain period of time).

As a result, your change, on communicated, is a surprise. When we are surprised, often, we are looking at a substantial portion of our income going away. I know that doesn't mean anything to you, but you have to expect that there will be a human reaction to that.

"The questions that they ask are dumb." An employer often requires us to ask and take questions to ensure that a person is qualified.

"We don't follow up do they do all the talking? Are they listening to what you are saying? Do they do the things they say they will when they well?" Do you?

I will simply say, recruiters are imperfect beings. We are sometimes held up by our clients who change their mind and have their circumstances change.

At the end of the day, we don't work for you. We work for an employer who is paying us just like you work for an employer who is paying you. When push has to come to shove, you can do whatever you wish, however, what you interpret as being a bad recruiter often isn't.

I will give you one thing. One of the best indicators of a good recruiter is longevity. They have had success in their field. Worked for their organization (organizations in general) for lengthy periods of time.

I'm not saying this to blow my own horn, but I have survived many recessions and thrived for more than 40 years. That should send a message to you. Will it be perfect for everyone? Absolutely not. A lot of people will judge me as a bad recruiter because I haven't help them.

Okay. Your background doesn't fit what my clients want to hire. Do you think I'm going to get on the phone and call thousand companies for FREE (because you're not paying me anything) to find a job for you? NO!!! I paid by organizations to find talent for them, not to find you a job.

So, remember, who does a recruiter work for? That's the basis of the question. The answer is an employer. They make the judgment by hiring the firm the recruiter works for, doing it time and again, hiring that individual recruiter time and again to fill positions

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

The Best Way, Time and Plan to Look for Your Next Job | JobSearchTV.com

Exactly that – – the best way, time and plan to look for your next job.

Summary

Some time ago. I did a video in response to a question where I was asked when is the best time to start looking for your next job? And the answer that I offered was on the day you start your new position. That's when you start thinking about your next job. Yes, you have to execute at your current job, the however is, you need to start planning your next steps.
What's the organization you think this one can lead you to next? What role can this job lead you to next complete with job title, compensation, reporting structure, perhaps even the hiring manager, as well.
Yeah, I know. This sounds screwy to a lot of you. The however is, when you think about it, you spend a lot of time lurching from search to search, you spend three years or three months working in a place when, suddenly you decide to go looking for another job. You really don't know where or what you want to do and you haven't really thought about it because you've been so focused on executing for your current job that you haven't thought about yourself. You haven't thought about your professional needs. You haven't thought about your career and you haven't treated yourself as the CEO of your own organization with responsibilities to your shareholders-- friends, family, whomever--to lead yourself in your career.
That mistake is probably one of the most pivotal mistakes that professionals make and, I have to say, it's probably not even restricted to professionals. There are people who start positions and takeblue collar jobs or at Retail establishments who don't really think about the next step for themselves when they finally get that paycheck.
They're just thinking about the current situation, working hard, hopefully getting ahead . . . and that is really disappeared from the American landscape. So, on the day you start your current position, it's important to start thinking ahead. Obviously, you should be doing it before you take the job but, work with me here, okay?Most people don't do that anymore than they do this.
So this is new information. So again, ideally you do it before you take the job ,where does this position lead me to, what's the stepping stone that can be derived from this and, if you don't do it before. You certainly have to do it on day one of your new position.
What's the next firmyou're going to work for. What role do you want to be in? What choices will I have? What's the comp level that this will lead me to if I do extraordinary work, how can I develop my brand further so people will discover me and reach out to me with these opportunities, so I don't have to aggressively market myself.
How do I develop relationships with people at that firm so that they will want to introduce me to a hiring manager that will want to hire me. It's a different way of thinking but one that's really pivotal for a lot of you. H
ave a great day.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Why Do Some LinkedIn Profiles Use General Job Functions Where the Title Usually Goes? | JobSearchTV.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2018/10/10/why-do-some-linkedin-profiles-use-general-job-functions-where-the-title-usually-goes-jobsearchradio-com/

Answer to yourself before watching my answer.

Summary

So I've got a fun question today. The question is, "why do some people on LinkedIn use general job functions where the title usually goes?"
It's a good question and I see that from time to time. There are a couple of possible reasons why people do it .Before I go into those, there are two areas where this can occur.
Number one is In the headline are The headline is where your name is. And then there's the line underneath it. So, underneath your name is one area where people often put their title. The other one is underneath their current and previous employers.
Both of areas where titles are pretty common. Now, in the in the case of the first one where we're dealing with, the. title, sometimes, isn't the best way to describe oneself. It's often best to think in terms of keywords and what the attraction would be in someone doing a search for you. So, if you think of LinkedIn and your individual profile as being something that needs to be search engine optimized like a website ,you want to have keywords there that will be attractive to firms looking for you.
So , inmy case, I might use the term recruiter .Headhunter. Terms along those lines because those describe what I do professionally and will be recognized by LinkedIn. (NOTE I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING)
Now, In either case, title sometimes are not quite descriptions. So, I sometimes see titles like "associate level 13. "What the hell does that mean? How is it different from an associate level 12 or 11 or 15? Instead of that, a pe?Rson might use a descriptor in that field in order to describe what it is that they do. So, that's one possible reason why someone might use terms that are search engine optimized or searchable or searched by people in order to be found in that spot It's not my ideal choice, but it's really a reason why.
Another reason why people do it is they made a mistake. They don't think their title is particularly relevant and it might be. So, sometimes people have mistaken notions of what should go in there, even though it's very clear. It says position so they duck the subject.
Maybe they're trying to indicate that they are not as high level or not as low level and they're trying to be described by function. But, when all is said and done, you know, when someone is being interviewed or spoken with my phone, they're going to be, "so what's your title," because it's a missing piece of information. Anything that's an omission or a conscious ommission becomes an area of Investigation by interviewers because they're curious.
Why did you choose to do that? Most people are relatively compliantand they do put in the position title. And why didn't you? That's the way I think. Anything that's out of the norm, I want to know more about . It doesn't make it bad, but it leaves me curious.
So far., I'm giving you the answers of. "they wanted use a search term and make that immediately visible." Sometimes it's a mistake that, most of the time, frankly,it is a mistake that job hunters make by putting it there because, frankly, you know at the end of the day, there's so much text particularly in the summary area where you can keyword stuff your profile to make it very attractive for search terms though.
Three main reasons I see .What do you think? Leave us a comment below. Let me know what your thoughts are.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.