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Job Search Radio

Finding Recruiters to Help You | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/06/14/finding-recruiters-to-help-you/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers someone’s question about finding a recruiter to help them locate an interesting new job.

Summary

Here is a question on Quora that I think is interesting and I will attempt to answer it.

"I'm working for a fairly large New York City company where I was the 1st software engineer on board. I have 10+ years of software development experience. In the past, I have applied normally for open jobs, however, the most interesting jobs seem to be filled before they are advertised. I would like to see if Tech recruiters can help me out here. In the past, I have been contacted by recruiters who just search for keywords which have just been a complete waste of time. I'm looking for recruiters who can actually find jobs that match my profile."

Like everything these days, it is all in the relationship. You want to put yourself in the position where you actually have a relationship with recruiters who are competent. How do you find recruiters there competent?

Let's start over the LinkedIn profile. You start with searching for recruiters who are in your target geography. You start searching for recruiters who might have positions that are available that superficially fit your background. If you think you can search from job search to job search with people looking out for you, let me just remind you the fact that you are asking people to work for nothing and they are actually getting paid by employers to fill jobs. I know this may not seem like a dichotomy to you, but it actually is.

If you think they recruit for you or you think they're trying to find work for you... That's not their job. Their job is actually to earn a commission by helping an organization find talent that they specify they need and then from there, identify talent that fits those roles. That's the nature of recruiting. Everything else are being told is BS. Let's go further.

How do you find those people? You can start with ads but is are probably going to get you more what you've already got. What you want to be doing is looking at LinkedIn profiles of recruiters that have jobs in your area. What you're looking for is a few things.

Numbers of years of experience. I'm not going to do a commercial for myself but more experience and a stable background is going to tell you something about the recruiter. What's it going to tell you? If you see someone with 6 months here and 3 months there and 9 months there who has change jobs pretty regularly, they are probably not a good producer because the firm would've wanted to tie them in and make them a part of their day to day operations. Instead, they are being let go regularly and they have to find another job regularly, someone else is giving them a chance, but they are not feeling lots of positions. That's trick number 1.

Trick number 2 is to see if you can find people who are writing, publishing, or what have you because they are committed to their career. They are not necessarily burn and churn artists. That's the 2nd thing that you can look for.

The 3rd thing is to listen to how they talk to you. Are they commoditizing you or are they taking some care and how they communicate with you. When they talk about the job opportunity, do they sound knowledgeable or do they sound like a jerk. I think you can discern the difference you recognize enough jerks of their behavior. At the end of the day, if someone calls you about the job, you can ask them, "So, tell me about your background." If they talk with you about it, you go to their LinkedIn profile and findings BS, they are lying to you.

There's an interesting thing that happens pretty often, recruiters of the truth of the LinkedIn profile and don't necessarily tell the truth when you talk to people over the phone. It's a funny dichotomy. At the end of the day, you have work to do in order to find these people, evaluate them and determine whether or not they can really help.

Recognize that if you find this job (it seems like you been in one place for 10 years and you are not a junior individual), stay in touch. Use them as a recruiting source for hiring. Keep them posted on what's going on at the firm that you joined and introduce them to people who are involved with hiring. That's can make you an ally for them and make you someone that they are going to want to help for many years to come.

Lurching from job search to job search is a mistaken strategy. Thinking that you can just arrive cold and have people leap all over you and care about you and be competent, it doesn't work that way. Just like you haven't paid attention to recruiters for 10 years, suddenly if you disappear it. After this search is complete, they are not paying attention to you.

I have a new little job guide that's available for Kindle and that my website, www.TheBigGameHunter.us

It's called, "Get Ready for The Job Jungle." It's perpetration tips for beginning a job search. There is a good section there about care and feeding tips for recruiters. It's cheap. It is the let them try to get rich on this thing, you know?

Order a copy of my website or order a copy for your Kindle where he made a whopping $0.35 for this. I think it's a useful too

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

What Do Recruiters Look For in a Resumé At First Glance? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/25/what-do-recruiters-look-for-in-a-resum-at-first-glance

EP 1296 Resumes are only looked at for a few seconds. What do people look for?

Summary

The question for today is, "We have all heard the stories, how few seconds people take to look at a resume. What 2 people actually look for in those few seconds?"

The question is actually very easy to answer. When we're looking at a resume, we are not looking at a full document. After all, when you think about it, when you look at a document on your screen. How much of the page shows up? Two thirds? Three quarters? That is about it.

So we are looking at a document that within two thirds or three quarters of the page ideally should be able to demonstrate some version of fit for a role.

I want to backtrack because you have a message area of your email and most people open, or have displayed on the screen and are using Outlook and have an additional pain available to them.

In an email, you want to indicate the position you are applying for. Maybe there is a job code or a title in the position description. If it is just the title provide something more because there could be multiple positions for the same title.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

What to Do When The Recruiter Calls | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/12/13/what-to-do-when-the-recruiter-calls-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1314 Here’s what to do if one calls you.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

How to Give a Recruiter a Rough Time (The H-1b version) | JobSearchTV.com

Do you have an H-1b visa? This is what some of you do that gives a recruiter a rough time.

Summary

I'm doing a short series about how to be up a recruiter. How to basically grind them down and where them out on your side. This one is specifically geared toward people with an H-1B visa . . . You know, people who are foreign nationals, legal right to work in the United States, no problem with that, but there's some things that you do that just drive recruiters crazy. Here are couple of examples period

The ad says that there no Visa transfers. You apply anyway. How do you think that's going to work? The client is unwilling to transfer a visa. What makes you think they are suddenly going to look at your resume and go, “OH! OH! OH! This person would be perfect! We are going to change corporate policy and agreed to transfer a visa.” It doesn't happen, does it? Do you know anyone that has ever happened to you? No. So, why are you doing it?

Another thing you do is send out your resume, it has a name and a phone number on it an email address. Where are you? The job ad indicates that the client is unwilling to relocate someone and we are supposed to figure out, based upon the name and phone number where you are. Because, even when you put your mobile number on there, you moved two or three times. You may not be anywhere near that place or you may be . . . We just have no way of knowing. I know you may be concerned about identity theft but city, state and ZIP Code on it, okay?

Then, there's a second reason for that. If you put city, state and ZIP Code on it and have uploaded a resume into a system, we can find you in the future when we do have something where there is a visa transfer. Without ZIP Code, where are you? Everyone is searching by the skills and are searching by proximity to the employer. Since most firms don't pay for relocation. So, with that, put your city, state and ZIP Code on so that, in this way, we can find you in the system. Because, ultimately what is starting to happen is you are spamming relentlessly. You're nothing but a Viagra ad are a Cialis add or someone trying to sell lottery tickets or nonsense.

I can't give you the courtesy of a phone call because I yet so many of these. Every day, there are so many in my inbox I have to set up signature files and reply, “what is your ZIP Code? Where are you as well as a series of other questions. Do you think I can call everyone, leave a message, have you get back to me and waste my time that way, too. So, bizarre of all things! Then, I write to you and you never respond back. All I’m doing is asking a couple of simple questions from a time management standpoint, but suddenly you go, “but why doesn’t he call me? I deserve a phone call!” It doesn't work that way, does it?

So I'm just asking you, instead of hurting so many people with your m, just follow the instructions in the job ad that you are applying to. If it says, “no third parties that are involved,” don't send a resume that says, “for more information on Corp to Corp work, contact my agent.” Why? Why are you doing this?

If the ad says, “no visa transfers,” don't apply. If the ad says, “no relocation,” give us an idea where you are because, I can’t tell you, I get so many resumes of different people who are away from the geography, you never look and then, you go, “Oh, well. Will they do remote work?”

NO!!!

They won’t do remote work!

So, don't be an idiot. Don't be cruel. Don't be an a**hole! Just make it clear. Where are you? Only apply to jobs that you fit. Follow the instructions in the ad.

So, I hate being blunt like this but I’ve just spent days like this recently, responding back to people and it hurts. You may not give a sh*t, I do. I’ve got a family, just like you do. So, be careful, okay?

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

What Is The Best Way to Locate the Recruiters With the Jobs I Am Looking For? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/07/what-is-the-best-way-to-locate-the-recruiters-with-the-jobs-i-am-looking-for

EP 1278 Someone wrote to me  with a bigger question than just this. Listen for a well-constructed question and my answer

Summary

"As you know, a job seeker cannot hire a contingency recruiter.  Contingency recruiter's work on behalf of companies, so there's no such thing is working with a single recruiter, as no single recruiter represents the wide array of jobs available on the market."  I want you to understand how well measure this is right off the bat.  They are basically saying, given how the economy is and how job searches done and how firms conduct themselves, no one recruiter has access to every job that is open.  Absolutely correct.

"As a consultant who changes jobs about every 18 months" (so now he's looking for consulting agencies), "I have literally dealt with hundreds of recruiters in the past 5 years.  The problem is is that the contingency recruiter business is staffed with people who have no relationship with the employer's whose jobs they are calling you about and cannot tell you the money. Even the most superficial things about the hiring company and its wants and needs."

"If I cannot hire recruiter and if no single recruiter, no matter how good, will represent all the jobs for which I may be qualified and desirous of, what is the best way to find those recruiters who have the jobs I'm looking for?"

There are couple of suppositions in this question that I want to deconstruct here.

"The contingency recruiting business is staffed with people who have no relationship with their clients."  The reason for that is that clients have developed push-back with a lot of the recruiters that work with.  They want that hands-off relationship, although they talk about wanting to have a close working relationship with a few search firms, they view contingency recruiting firms and consulting agencies as being nothing more than commodity providers.  Thus, the issue isn't the recruiter, it is the corporation.  But I digress a little bit.

"If you can't hire a recruiter and no single recruiter, no matter how good represents all the jobs for which I may be qualified, what is the best way to find the recruiters who represent the jobs I'm looking for?"

I'd like to turn this around and call attention to the fact that you are outsourcing your job search to recruiters. Why would you ever why would you ever outsource your career to third-party, recruiters and consulting agencies who have no interest in you?  Who can't tell you anything?  Now, you say you want the best who represent the jobs that you are looking for, well, obviously, you tried the way of looking at job boards, getting on LinkedIn and doing a whole host of other things, I'm sure.  Well, the answer isn't just with the recruiter it's with you and the choice that you've made to outsource to recruiters.

You have to put yourself in the position of being found.  You have to develop a brand for your work.  You have to market yourself directly to firms in order for them to know you so that when it comes time for them to need a consultant like you, or attempt like you (I don't know the kind of work that you do. I'll call you a consultant because that's the way that you refer to yourself).

As someone who is worked in consulting and is done so for the last 5 years, you've probably already accumulated a database. Probably small, but you need to maintain contact with people. You need to network.  You need to put yourself in the position of being found in marketing yourself as as a successful individual who can help organizations.

You'll probably say, "but I'm doing my job all day!  I'm coming home at night and I'm tired and I'm putting a lot of effort and you are asking me to do more."  You are absolutely right.  The fact of the matter is (and it is a fact), if you outsource your effort to recruiters, you will get more of the same.  That's because there is no answer to your original question.

Let me talk about myself.  I've been in the search business for more than 40 years.  I have successfully filled more than 1200 full-time positions plus a boatload of consulting assignments. I'm good at what I do.  People love me.  Don't believe me?  Read some of the quotes on my LinkedIn profile.  There are a ton of them there.

For you, you have to develop a reputation for yourself, a brand for yourself, where people in your geographic market area or in the market area that you want to serve know about you.  You have to attend meetings for the specialty that you serve.. If there is no group, start one.  Start to create one, be the go to person. Create a LinkedIn group.  Same topic.  Make yourself known. If that is what is needed.  Promote yourself. Write.  Be interviewed for podcasts.  Be interviewed in the trade press.  There are lots of different ways.

Get a subscription to HARO (Help A Reporter Out). Do a Google search for it.  Start reviewing the 3 times a day emails that you get with offers that reporters and broadcasters and TV networks have for experts about particular subjects.  A lot of it is going to be useless to you and then you get the special ones were suddenly you're in front of a huge audience and have an opportunity to promote yourself.

You have to be a marketing machine.  You need to develop the expertise to cellular service and not outsource it to people who you obviously don't think can really help you.  You are right. They cannot help you as well as you can.  Their job is not to brand you.  Their job is to fill jobs with clients.  Their job is not to represent you.

So, yes, some of them will have jobs for you that will fit you?  It will be hit or miss, you already know that.  The solution is not with the agency, not with the consulting firm. It's with you.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

How Do I Get a Recruiter to Respond to A Salary Negotiation? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/03/19/how-do-i-get-a-recruiter-to-respond-to-a-salary-negotiation

EP 1048 There has been no response to emails or instant messaging. I don’t want to bother my boss. Why aren’t they getting back to me?

Summary

I was asked, "How do I get a recruiter to respond to a salary negotiation?"

The person has been an intern and they have made an offer to them.  The recruiter for this firm hasn't been responding to emails or instant messaging and the intern is frustrated.  They want to find out how they can reach this person for negotiating.

Here are a few points:

As an intern who is converting to full-time staff, you are small fish on their plate.  I have other, more important fish to fry, too.  HR has a lot of things on their plate; they have hiring managers who are demanding service; they are interviewing; they are trying to fill positions; they are writing a heads… There are many things that HR is doing… You are not a big concern for them.
This HR person may be out of the office.  They may be traveling. They may be doing campus recruiting, hence why they may not be responding to you.
You are right not to trouble your boss.  This is not a major priority.  If the rule, they offered you a job  and you have already done parts of this job before.  They will probably be asking themselves, "What's the big deal?  You knew what the price point was we brought you want for this internship?"
They just don't care.  There's no point or concern that they have, because, after all, it's not like you're the only intern on the planet or qualified to do this job.  There are others. Their desire to negotiate is really small.
Let me summarize for you where you stand.

On the one side there is a rock. On the other side, there is a hard place.  You are somewhere between the two.

If your goal is to just make the connection and they are not respond, send an email to HR with the subject line, "Are you okay?"  The message may read something along the lines of, "I have emailed and I am do you and had not received a response.  I have a few questions about the job offer.  Would you give me a call, please?  I just want to make sure you are okay?  My experience of you is that you would normally get back to me but since I haven't heard, I just want to make sure that you are all right."

That will usually "guilt them" into surfacing.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

How Do Recruiters Handle Salary Negotiation? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/05/how-do-recruiters-handle-salary-negotiation-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1277 What do recruiters do or not do to advocate for you?

Summary

Let me speak to you today about how recruiters handle salary negotiation.

If you think recruiters go through mortal combat to advocate for you, and demand that employers pay you what you are asking for, you are kidding yourself. Let me walk through the typical process that recruiters go through. This is true of both retained a contingency search terms.

The employer contacts the search for; they contact an agency; I'm going to give both perspectives. They identify a role to be filled in the compensation that might be paid. They suggest a salary range and what bonuses might be like, what the benefits are… A whole host of things.

If the search firm has a relationship with this particular client, do you really think that this recruiter is going to start yelling and screaming at someone from his firm to get the money that you are asking for or are they more concerned about preserving the relationship with the firm that writes the check to them?

Yes, you can argue the case that without you. They are not going to get that check. But, at the end of the day, there is always another "you." Yes, there can always be another employer, but there is work to open up their relationship and create that relationship again so they tend to advocate for the people who write the check.

For Example
So, starting with the process of your resume being submitted, they have a sense of the range and I'm going to use simple numbers here. $60,000. $100,000. $250,000. Here are 3 different salaries

Let's say, for a $60,000 person, let's say the range is $55,000-$75,000. For the $100,000 person, is $95,000-$110,000. For the $250,000 person, is $240,000-$275,000.

They know these are the ranges for these positions. So they may indicate what your current salary is and the sense of what you are looking for, or may just tell them your current salary.

If you attempt to to simply tell them what you are looking for and not talk about what you are currently earning, often (like, always), a firm will turn around and ask, "What's he earning now?" "What is she earning?"

They do that because they refuse to give someone a prohibitively high raise.

Sales may be different. Sometimes, this will be called off. But for other types of positions, this is what happens. It is very very rare that a huge percentage increase will occur. Why? Because they are all operating under budget guidelines where HR is being reviewed and all their behaviors are being analyzed and when there is a percentage increase above a particular mean that is mandated by corporate HR, they turn around and ask, "What the hell was this all about?" It adversely affects them and how they are seen. So they operate within these guidelines basically say, "if a person makes $60,000, you offer them $66,000. That is a 10% raise. That is good enough."

Guidelines
"If a person makes $100,000, you offer them $105,000 or $110,000. That is a 5% or 10% raise. That is good enough."

"If a person is making $250,000, or for them to earn $260,000 or $265,000. We don't give 10% raises at that level. We give X percent increases."

See where I'm coming from?

That is the behavior that starts off. Thus, when the offer comes in, it might be low. Let me go back a step.

You are interviewing along the way and now, if you are out of work, you may be asked in the course of your interviews, "So, what's going on for you in your search? Are you close to anything?" If you say you don't have anything going on right now, you just hurt yourself. You have lost your leverage. They can issue an offer to you and say, "Take it or leave it. It's your choice. We have other people that can do what you do. We'll go find them and you are out of luck."

If you are working or are asked this question, you say, "I have some other options. Firms have expressed interest and I have final interviews with 3 other firms," then they understand is competitive and they may push things up. If they ask which firms, you say, "I would prefer to keep their name out of it so that everyone is bargaining with the same degree of knowledge."

"If I say to you, I'm interviewing at this firm or that firm or this firm, and I do the same thing with them, I think that is unfair. I want to see what your best offer is based upon your assessment of me, not based upon the competition." But, what you are doing is creating competition because they don't know what the target numbers.

If you tell them what the target number is it these other firms, that's probably what they're going to come in for anyway. No one tends to go much higher.

If there is a low offer that comes in, a search firm is going to advocate for you. They will spend some time talking with the client. The client will counteract that remark, generally with a comment that says, "Well, based upon a comparison with people who we already have working here with that amount of experience in this level of skill, we assess this person would be worth X number of dollars."

Most of the time when it really comes down to is that you didn't do a good enough job you're interviewing to demonstrate your value at the level that you are asking for. Thus, they are making a lukewarm offer based upon the opportunity that has been presented.

Your recruiter is not going to go into a death-match with the hiring firm in order to get you the position. They would rather go into that death-match with you, to manipulate you or persuade you to accept the offer at the level that is been offered.

Why is that? The job under is easier to change then the employer is and they know the relationship with the employer can continue afterwards, particularly if they got you to say yes to the low offer.

That's the scenario that normally comes up.

If you have a question about job hunting, email me at [email protected] I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Working With a Recruiter | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/02/working-with-a-recruiter-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1274 People have silly ideas about recruiters and what they do. Let me clear things up.

Summary

Let me just talk with you for a 2nd about the role of recruiters in your job search and some of the mistakes people make when they start working with recruiters – – mistakes in attitude, mistakes that come with misunderstanding the role.

The language of job hunters is, "I'm going to contact recruiter and they are going to help me find the job."  Or, " I'm going to contact a bunch of recruiters and they will help me find a job."

Wrong.

That's not the case.  

Recruiters are hired by organizations and paid to find people who fill a job that is open.

"But they need me for this!"

You are absolutely right, but you are a commodity.  I want you to hear that again.  If you think you are the only person in your market area who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  If you think you're the only person in the country who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  Recruiters are paid by corporations to find people with specific talent, specific backgrounds that can do the role.  They are not there to help you transition 99.9% of the time.

They are not there to be career coaches.  They are not there to respond to your messages when you when you send a resume that says, "Hey, what do you think?"

Give me a break. You are stealing time from them.  You think they are going to critique your resume for you… I have this happen to me all the time.  People send me a message that says, "Take a look at my resume.  Please do a rewrite for me."  Andy, they don't want to pay me anything for it.  Help me understand why I'm supposed to do this.

"Because we will build a relationship!"'  Sure.  I never heard from you before, and I'll never hear from you again.  That's my experience. And I've only done this for 40 years.

Recruiters are there to fill jobs by finding people who have specific backgrounds and match certain preferences that an organization has and are paid as a result of finding this correct person.

Recruiters Aren't Rude

The next thing that people make this goofy association with is that recruiters are rude and unresponsive.  Many times, you are a spammer.  You are sending resumes to a cruise that in no way, shape or form does your background for what they are looking for a you are expecting them to STOP, say, "Okay, I'm going to call this guy, even though I will never have anything for them," or STOP and say to ourselves, "This 1 woman wants to make a transition into a completely different field, and she has no background in this whatsoever but she wants to do it.  Let me call her."

I think the witness really comes from the fact that you're contacting them and have expectations that are unreasonable.

Recognize that when you tried to steal someone's time, the result winds up being that you are the weird one because you are making demands of them that are completely unreasonable.  The next thing is that recruiters are not held to get the best compensation that they can.  The truth of the matter is, the recruiter wants to do the deal.

Let me repeat that.  The recruiter wants to do the deal.  The one that the recruiter wants to do is the one that the client is willing that to pay them to do in order to deliver a candid.  For example, if you are offered $60,000 or $100,000 or $250,000, and you are looking for $67.5 or $110 or $275, you may think they are trying to scam you hear but the reality is, the client will pay anymore for you.  They will be paid anything. If they don't deliver you to them.  So, they will try to deliver you, they will try to be persuasive about why your value is not as high as you think it is.

Hopefully, you did research at the beginning of the search (You did that, didn't you?  Most people don't, let's not kid ourselves.  You probably didn't do research at the beginning of your search, other than to ask friends or family who have no real knowledge).  For you, as a job hunter, you need to understand your value and, because you want it, it doesn't mean you have that value.

If the market is rejecting you and you have been on a bunch of interviews, with no offers, and no callbacks him him, and no interest, the market is telling you that you are not as good as you think you are and you don't have the value that you think you have.  Recognize this and you have to be the one that adapts.

Or, be prepared to turn down an offer and go on to the next thing which is perfectly fine.  However, understand that the recruiter was there to do the deal.

Lastly, recruiters care about building long-term relationships with people.  They want to help them become hiring managers and higher from them.  That is really where they make more money.  From your vantage point, you may think they are transactional, but that is because you have been a spammer most of the time.  You have been submitting resume after resume after resume that doesn't fit what they're looking for, wondering why you don't get a phone call.

Try Walking in a Recruiter's Shoes Sometime

If you think I'm wrong. Folks, you have to live on my side of the desk; I walk in on a typical day to 150 to 200 emails plus messages in my LinkedIn inbox and clients that want feedback on interviews that have taken place.  It is job hunters that send resumes with very specific requirements  (When I run a ads, I try to make it crystal clear what my client is looking for) at submit resumes that aren't even close, not even in the same industry – – like the IT security role with risk management background applied to by the security guard.  If the person took 1 2nd to read the job description, you wouldn't apply but you still my time.

So, again, often the issue with job hunters, isn't the recruiter.  It's you.  You are the problem here.  Your behavior sets up this adversarial relationship. I know you don't want to hear it, but I'm here to give you no BS job search advice, even if it makes you squirm.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Is It Normal For a Recruiter To Ask About Salary When I Am Not Looking for a Job? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/30/is-it-normal-for-a-recruiter-to-ask-about-salary-when-i-am-not-looking-for-a-job

EP 1301 The search firm is on the phone pushing me about my current compensation and I am not looking for a job. Is this normal?

Summary

"Is it normal to get a call from a recruiter for questions about current and previous salaries while I'm explaining that I am not looking for a move?"

The answer is, "Yes." However, let me dissect what is going on. They are trying to fill a position; they are sourcing for job. They are trying to find someone with a particular background. Here's what they've got. They have a job description or yellowing from the client about what they are looking for., Including prices that they're willing to pay for this talent.

You are saying, "I'm not interested," but, they are doing 1 of 2 things. There going to try to convince you, because your salary is much lower in there going to try to persuade you with money OR if you are interrupting them and saying, "I'm not interested," there trying to build a database of that they have an idea of what price point you are at for the future. In this way, they can recontact you when they have something that makes sense.

The 1st scenario is the more likely one. That's when they are trying to find out whether they can talk with you about salary, can the persuade you with money, even though you are not interested.

For example, you're making $100,000 per year, $125,000 per year... Whatever it is and they say to you, "This is a position that will pay between $110,000 and $125,000," on the 1st scenario. Or you are at $125,000 and they will say, "this is a position that can get you to $140,000 per year, maybe $150,000 a year PLUS BONUS!!!" Is just so much money in there . They're just trying to break down your defenses.

Yes, it is normal, because most recruiters, at least in the contingency business, not in executive search, what they are trying to do most of the time is break you down in 2 ways. Number 1 is money. Number 2 is opportunity. "I have a career opportunity where my client is looking for a rockstar to work for them and do magical things." I'm being goofy there, but that's what most of the sales pitches come down to.

So, yes, it is normal. Yes, it is very much part of the repertoire of recruiters. No, you don't need to comply. I am going to repeat that. No, you don't need to comply. BUT, the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those a great qualities to have). People get ahead by being alert to opportunities and not falling for company pablum that wears them down and get them stuck in the job that they say they are happy at until one day someone calls out to them and says, "Hey, Charlie, come here. Meet us in the conference room." And in the fire you. When the economy goes south.

You are the chairman of the board of your organization. In my case, it would be The Altman Organization. Thus, I am responsible for me and you have to think about the chairman of your organization, as well. If you are a compliant, meek little nice person working for a company, you are going to lose out and eventually, your employer is going to spit you out.

Don't believe me? Look at what happened to millions of people just in the United States between 2008 and 2010. Look out for yourself. Don't just pause and go, "hey, I am in a good job. This is a good job. I like my good job." Maybe there is a better one. Listen. Be smart. If you listen and then decide,. "This is not for me," maybe the commute is to longer the money isn't right, I can't do it right now. We've got this trip that we are planning, whatever the reason is don't do it.

But, be smart and listen. Then make the decision.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Job Search Radio

Is It OK to Add a Recruiter on LinkedIn After an Interview? | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2016/10/12/job-search-radio-is-it-ok-to-add-a-recruiter-on-linkedin-after-an-interview%e2%80%8b/

I love this question! It shows that the person is thinking and trying to use a new relationship to build your network. But the question is a little unclear. Agency recruiter? Corporate recruiter? I decided to answer both.

Summary

Today's question is, "Is It OK to Add a Recruiter on LinkedIn After An Interview? Whether You've Gotten the Job or Or Not"

Great question. One thing I don't know is whether this is an agency recruiter corporate recruiter. I'll take the time to answer both. Let me start with agency recruiter.

Why are you waiting until after an interview???You can do that right at the beginning.You'll get access to their connections and, of course, they'll get access to yours. But let me let you in on a secret.They probably have far more connections than you so you benefit far more by the request and they do. They may pick up a small incremental addition. Using myself as an example, I'm someone with over 16,00 1st level connections. I only start adding LIONs (LinkedIn Open Networkers) and recruiters In the past few months. Most of my contacts are with "civilians." You know, people who are employed in organizations looking for work or who are successful in organizations.

For me, I pick up very little from you you pick up a lot for me. Reach out to agency recruiters all the time in the market area that you work. Do not delay.

Corporate recruiters. Reach out to corporate recruiters. Julie after the interview, whether you get the job or not. Reach out to the hiring managers you talked with after the interview whether you get the job or not. For the hiring manager, you can say something like, "I enjoyed speaking with you. Whether you choose me or not, I would like to stay in touch."

It's a real simple, human message. Do the same thing with the corporate HR recruiter. Send the same type of message.

"Thanks for taking the time to speak with me today. Whether you advance my candidacy are not, I would like to stay in touch. After all, you never know where we might run into one another again. Perhaps we can help one another."

It's a nice approach. So, by all means, reach out to recruiters. You don't have to wait to connect with agency recruiters. With hiring managers and corporate recruiters, yes, wait until after you meet with them. That's the perfect time.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Job Search Radio
Job Search Radio

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.