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JobSearchTV.com

Working with Recruiters


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice to you about working with recruiters.

Summary

Today, I want to offer you some No BS Job Search Advice about working with recruiters. Now, many of you have very unrealistic expectations of what a recruiter going to be able to for you.
I want to take the mythology out of it. Recruiters aren't there to find you a job. Recruiters in there to fill jobs that their clients need to have filled and then get paid for their work. You are the collateral requirement to be able to do that. However, they're going to find the job for you once . . . maybe. They're hoping to have a relationship with this client where they're filling lots of jobs.
Now, from your vantage point, there are a couple of different things you have to pay attention to. One is if you're sending an unsolicited resume to them, why would you expect that they're going to call you? They may not have anything for you. You are just sending spam to them. So that's point number one.
Point number two is when you send your resume, make the resume demonstrate the fit in a way that's obvious. All recruiters are overwhelmed with resumes these days, because it's so easy for you to send them out. Most of what we get is garbage. It's garbage because they in no way shape or form demonstrates a fit for the position you think you're qualified for. You're wasting our time. So, the second point is tailor your resume for every job that you submit it to. Every resume that you submit to a recruiter, use a cover letter emphasizing some of those points.
Now, I don't mean attaching an extra file there. The extra file isn't going to be read. But using the mess age area of the email to call attention to the fit that your resume is also going to display goes a long way toward getting a recruiter's attention.
Number three is, yes, they're trying to help you find the position. But more importantly, they're trying to fill the requirement at a client. They don't want to get yelled at by the client. Take their coaching. They know these situations better than you do. And they know this client.I have to say hopefully because you may be talking to the junior recruiter, and the senior's really the one who knows the client well. Get to the person who's the account manager in order to ensure that you're getting the best coaching before each interview.
Finally, when it comes time to salary negotiations, they're in an awkward position. The client is telling them how much they're willing to pay. They're trying to drive you to that number. Make sure that if you're getting a signal that that number that you're looking for, isn't going to be met by the client, halt the process somewhere.
Now, I'm not saying yell and scream, I want to be clear about that. But halt the process and just make sure that the numbers that you're talking about are numbers that can be met later on. Otherwise, you're going to waste a lot of time interviewing for something pointless that's going to result in you turning down the offer.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Why Would a Company Pay a Fee to A Recruiter? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/04/16/why-would-a-company-pay-a-fee-to-a-recruiter-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1436 I think the answer is obvious but I worked in search for more than 40 years. Here’s the reason.

Summary

Having worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years, I have a perspective on answering this question… "Why would a company pay a fee to a recruiter? They are so expensive!"

When you stop and think about it for a second and look at it from a company's perspective, I will divide this between contingency a retained search firms, if they are working with a contingency recruiting firm, you can work with multiple firms and only pay the one that provides the person that was hired. That means you have a sales force available to you that is enormous out there trying to find the right talent for your firm to hire.

But still, it seems expensive. A company will pay a fee of 20%, 22.5%, 25%, 30%, 35% or even more on a contingency basis. For retained firm, is always the high end of the scale plus expenses. This seems expensive. Again, let's look at from the employer's perspective... You may have a few people doing recruiting for your firm. Some firms may work with a team of individuals who are able to source, interview, assess, and refer talent because they have a big pool of. Individuals available to them doing the recruiting.

Using IT or accounting as an example, most firms are not going to have a team of individuals that their firm. They may have one individual who is responsible for filling a certain type of role. Not only are they filling one type of job, but they are filling multiple jobs. They have to find these people.

You may say, "Just run an ad!" That's easy for you to suggest. Typically, you get many many many bad responses, hoping against hope, that one person comes through their that you want to actually talk to. You see, there is a lot of kissing frogs and talking to frogs before you decide you actually want to go out on a date with them let alone customer want to get married to them! As a result, there is a lot of time that goes into sourcing talent.. The result is a decision that you would be better served by having a bigger salesforce out there serving you to find talent and qualifying people for you.

What third-party recruiters and sourcers often do is that they are out there finding the talent and referring people for interviews. From there, companies take over and do the rest of the process. They don't do the scheduling; the 3rd party recruiter or the sourcer or might do that. It just saves them a lot of time he gets an access to a bigger pool of talent because their "sales force" is bigger.

In addition, you may be thinking of one job. They may be trying to fill 15 or 20 different types of jobs. As a result, there just isn't enough time and in the day to do that. Without a doubt, companies find it cost-effective to pay the fee on a contingency basis to whoever finds the right talent.

On a retained basis, it is different. On a retained basis, you are paying them for focused attention. They ARE going to find that person you will eventually hire. Thus, you are prepaying them a certain amount of money to purchase their attention and commitment to filling a particular job. This tends to be done for positions in a high level within an organization. C suite and senior positions in an organization will generally be put out to a retained search firm. They are definitely going to fill that job. It is cost-effective for them. Is cost-effective because they can't dedicate the resources to do everything they need to do.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Don’t Delete The Recruiter! | JobSearchTV.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why you should pay attention when a recruiter contacts you about a job opportunity.

Summary

Today I want to talk with you about what I'll nickname don't delete the recruiter. Let me explain what triggers this one,
Every time I get a new requirement, I have a database and I'll send an email out to people in my database who fit the skills requirement. And I'll just very simply say, "I'm doing a search for a client, describe what the client is or does, where they're located. I'll describe the position and the compensation. I'll continued by saying, "it's been a long time since we've been in contact. I thought it would drop a note to you and see if you might be interested. If you're qualified, interested in available please email me email a copy of your resume to me at . . . "and I provide my email address.
Now, often way too often, I receive a response that is almost the yelling at me.
"I told you to delete my email address before. Or it'll say, "get rid of this," or it will just simply say, "remove," you know, the polite version of go away.
That's okay. That however, is why I want to explain to you why it's not really in your interest to do any of those.
What I want to start with the premise that I think you can agree with is the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest, they don't always work the hardest, although those are two great qualities to have. People could head by being alert to opportunity. Sometimes, those opportunities are internal to the organization. More often than not, they are external. Can you agree with that?
If you can, you can skip the rest of this video. If you can't, then I'll simply say you can't predict when opportunity is going to land in your lap. It won't necessarily arrive at a time where you decide that it's the right time. What you can do is just remain alert.
Now, you'll receive many emails from recruiters. They'll seem absolutely wrong. And I'll speak of myself early in my career where, again, I'be been doing this for more than 40 years. Now, when I was in my first or second year and sometimes later, I would contact someone who in no way shape or form fit a job because I just didn't know any better. I'm still learning my craft.
And yet at the same time, many of these opportunities I presented, eventually, whether it be right for someone, does that mean you should be abusive to the recruiter if they make a mistake or if they contact you at the wrong time? No, of course, not. Does that mean that you have to say yes to everything that's offered up to you. Of course, not. However, the only way you can know about these opportunities is if you read the email or listen to the phone, call that you get.
Sometimes, you'll want to take another step. Sometimes you'll simply say (and this is all you have to say) is, "I'm not interested in this. It doesn't sound like a worthwhile opportunity for me at this time. Thanks. You can stay in touch with other things. I'm not aggressively looking. But if you think there's something that makes sense, give me a call or send me an email." It's really that simple.
Because, again, if someone said to you and I'll use my own name, "Jeff, I have an opportunity for you to go on TV and be a reality star doing a pilot for show on TV, do you think I would hang up? No, of course, not. I would want to know more. I might audition; I might do more.
But if I wasn't interested, all I had to do is say, "you know, thank you. I'm very flattered that you reached out to me it doesn't seem like something I'd want to do."

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

What Does It Mean When A Recruiter Says a Position Pays Executive Compensation? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/04/11/what-does-it-mean-when-a-recruiter-says-a-position-pays-executive-compensation

EP 1431 I received a call from a recruiter who told me that the position paid “executive compensation.”  What does that mean?

Summary

The question I received is, "What does it mean when a recruiter says a position pays 'executive compensation?'" Executive compensation. Doesn't that give you an image of a lot of money. ?

Well, what it means is that, number 1, you're probably dealing with a contingency recruiting firm because a retained search firm will tell you the comp without a doubt.

Number 2 is a probably means that the comp is at the low end of the scale and they are trying to influence you by this generic phrase, "executive compensation." After all, what mean doesn't mean? At $750, $1.5 million to $250? What is that number?

So executive compensation is a signal that this is probably a low salary and the recruiter doesn't want to say it for fear that youor jus going to away.

In addition. It seems to me that they are being kin of insulting to you. They see you as a junior person who can be influenced by such BS.

So here's what I would suggest you do any time you hear 1 of these types of phrases whether it's this 1 or another one that is designed to influence you but says nothing. What I want to do is say, "I have to stop you here for a second. First, executive compensation means a lot of things and, to me,it means one thing; to yo it may mean something else. What do you mean by executive compensation? Be specific."

"They are going to pay market scale from this."

"No. please be specific. You may think executive compensation is $125000 and my definition of that is $450000.So what does your client mean by executive compensation? Get the number out from them.

If there are unwilling to share what the number is, your time is about to be wasted so don't bother. Retained firms will do it because they are giving you a lot more disclosure than the contingency firms. So, rather than allowing yourself to be gamed by them, rather than falling prey to the BS, get the specific number from them; it's really that simple.

And if they're not willing to do it, you'll save yourself a lot of time and aggravation.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Job Search Radio

Working With a Recruiter | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2016/11/07/job-search-radio-working-with-a-recruiter/

People have silly ideas about recruiters and what they do. Let me clear things up.

Summary

Let me just talk with you for a 2nd about the role of recruiters in your job search and some of the mistakes people make when they start working with recruiters – – mistakes in attitude, mistakes that come with misunderstanding the role.

The language of job hunters is, "I'm going to contact recruiter and they are going to help me find the job."  Or, " I'm going to contact a bunch of recruiters and they will help me find a job."

Wrong.

That's not the case.  

Recruiters are hired by organizations and paid to find people who fill a job that is open.

"But they need me for this!"

You are absolutely right, but you are a commodity.  I want you to hear that again.  If you think you are the only person in your market area who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  If you think you're the only person in the country who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  Recruiters are paid by corporations to find people with specific talent, specific backgrounds that can do the role.  They are not there to help you transition 99.9% of the time.

They are not there to be career coaches.  They are not there to respond to your messages when you when you send a resume that says, "Hey, what do you think?"

Give me a break. You are stealing time from them.  You think they are going to critique your resume for you… I have this happen to me all the time.  People send me a message that says, "Take a look at my resume.  Please do a rewrite for me."  Andy, they don't want to pay me anything for it.  Help me understand why I'm supposed to do this.

"Because we will build a relationship!"'  Sure.  I never heard from you before, and I'll never hear from you again.  That's my experience. And I've only done this for 40 years.

Recruiters are there to fill jobs by finding people who have specific backgrounds and match certain preferences that an organization has and are paid as a result of finding this correct person.

Recruiters Aren't Rude

The next thing that people make this goofy association with is that recruiters are rude and unresponsive.  Many times, you are a spammer.  You are sending resumes to a cruise that in no way, shape or form does your background for what they are looking for a you are expecting them to STOP, say, "Okay, I'm going to call this guy, even though I will never have anything for them," or STOP and say to ourselves, "This 1 woman wants to make a transition into a completely different field, and she has no background in this whatsoever but she wants to do it.  Let me call her."

I think the witness really comes from the fact that you're contacting them and have expectations that are unreasonable.

Recognize that when you tried to steal someone's time, the result winds up being that you are the weird one because you are making demands of them that are completely unreasonable.  The next thing is that recruiters are not held to get the best compensation that they can.  The truth of the matter is, the recruiter wants to do the deal.

Let me repeat that.  The recruiter wants to do the deal.  The one that the recruiter wants to do is the one that the client is willing that to pay them to do in order to deliver a candid.  For example, if you are offered $60,000 or $100,000 or $250,000, and you are looking for $67.5 or $110 or $275, you may think they are trying to scam you hear but the reality is, the client will pay anymore for you.  They will be paid anything. If they don't deliver you to them.  So, they will try to deliver you, they will try to be persuasive about why your value is not as high as you think it is.

Hopefully, you did research at the beginning of the search (You did that, didn't you?  Most people don't, let's not kid ourselves.  You probably didn't do research at the beginning of your search, other than to ask friends or family who have no real knowledge).  For you, as a job hunter, you need to understand your value and, because you want it, it doesn't mean you have that value.

If the market is rejecting you and you have been on a bunch of interviews, with no offers, and no callbacks him him, and no interest, the market is telling you that you are not as good as you think you are and you don't have the value that you think you have.  Recognize this and you have to be the one that adapts.

Or, be prepared to turn down an offer and go on to the next thing which is perfectly fine.  However, understand that the recruiter was there to do the deal.

Lastly, recruiters care about building long-term relationships with people.  They want to help them become hiring managers and higher from them.  That is really where they make more money.  From your vantage point, you may think they are transactional, but that is because you have been a spammer most of the time.  You have been submitting resume after resume after resume that doesn't fit what they're looking for, wondering why you don't get a phone call.

Try Walking in a Recruiter's Shoes Sometime

If you think I'm wrong. Folks, you have to live on my side of the desk; I walk in on a typical day to 150 to 200 emails plus messages in my LinkedIn inbox and clients that want feedback on interviews that have taken place.  It is job hunters that send resumes with very specific requirements  (When I run a ads, I try to make it crystal clear what my client is looking for) at submit resumes that aren't even close, not even in the same industry – – like the IT security role with risk management background applied to by the security guard.  If the person took 1 2nd to read the job description, you wouldn't apply but you still my time.

So, again, often the issue with job hunters, isn't the recruiter.  It's you.  You are the problem here.  Your behavior sets up this adversarial relationship. I know you don't want to hear it, but I'm here to give you no BS job search advice, even if it makes you squirm.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

Job Search Radio
Job Search Radio

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

free Kindle versions

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Job Search Radio

​Third Party Recruiters: How to Get on Their Radar | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/10/19/%e2%80%8bthird-party-recruiters-how-to-get-on-their-radar/

On today’s show,  I discuss how to get on a recruiter’s radar.

Summary

I'm here today with my daily video about some element of job search, which is totally going to be about working with third party recruiters and how to get on the radar.
You know, what you may consider a recruiter may actually be like an agency. And by that I mean a firm that basically responds to resumes that are sent to them. They are not out there aggressively trying to find people. They are not hunting down leaders and staff for organizations. So, I want to deal with all contingencies here.
So, in the traditional agency model, they receive a resume. They're trying to respond to it. They're trying to fill jobs, right. And it doesn't matter which type you work with, many contingency third party agents, are very effective in filling jobs. So how do you get on their radar? There's a couple of ways.
Number one is to actually submit a resume that demonstrates you fit the job that they're trying to fill. You've seen it. It's the roadmap for what they're looking for. Take a look at your resume and ask yourself, "How does that really match up? Does it match up? Do I have the experience but my resume doesn't really express it well? I need to fix the resume," because that's going to be the benchmark by which they go.
You can also get on their radar by . . . their are going to be times that they'll contact you and say, "Hey, I'm doing a search for client. Do you know someone," and being supportive of them. If you get abusive, and one particular recruiter calls you every day four times a day for referrals and just tell them, "this is getting to be a little too much. I'm willing to help but I'm not stupid, I've got a job to do. It's not putting money in your pocket. I'm here to help. willing to help but why don't you send me an email with this information."
Now, in the true recruiter model, they're out there hunting for you. They're trying to find you. If you're working with or at a level where they're going to be dealing with a contingency firm or an executive search firm, it really doesn't matter. Part of it is they wanted them to find you and there's a number of easy ways to do it.
Number one is you start being in situations where there's publicity about you. So, for example, you've written a Firms are going to wind up looking for someone like that because they represent being an expert. In other words, that's how you are not at that high a level where you're an author and publishing material with a major publisher.
Things you can do is speak at conferences. You can be part of the program for a training group where you're presenting with a subject. It doesn't have to be the most sophisticated presentation but understand they'll find you through Google.
Another way-- your LinkedIn profile. There are recruiters to operate at that level. They're looking through LinkedIn and need to demonstrate a keyword rich LinkedIn profile where they're finding you based upon your experiences. They're seeing things in the profile, such as articles that you've written for LinkedIn, connections to podcasts where you are interviewed, or, perhaps, PowerPoints on SlideShares that help firms recognize and help recruiters recognize I should say that you're not the average individual. By doing these PowerPoints and putting them up on SlideShare connected to your LinkedIn profile, it's a great way to stand out from the pack anf demonstrate that you are an expert.
Have a website where you have your resume. Have a blog on that website, where you talk about, not your family, but professional matters. These were all great ways for discovery to occur, because, understand, real headhunters are out there trying to find you and they are looking for people in ways where they're not trying to find you on LinkedIn most of the time. They may use LinkedIn to correlate, but they're using Google to try and find people who will impress their client just by the fact that there was pr about them and they presented a whole host of things along these lines.
So, i want you to think of your career as a business and, in doing so, we look at what businesses do to be discovered. You know it's not just advertising that they do because their are a lot of places that don't advertise that you go to, right? It's not just purely because you've seen them in your neighborhood that you're buying. After all, the first time you shop ped on Amazon, you never heard of them before, right? No idea of what to expect. But you went to amazon and had a great experience.
Again, you want to be discovered and put yourself in the position to be discovered that will go a long way toward being discovered by third party recruiters. Again, it was working with at the agency level with someone who only responds to resumes that are sent to them. Remember, your resume just has to demonstrate the fir. They'll be happy to help.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Job Search Radio
Job Search Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Did Your Recruiter Lie To You About What Job You Would Get? | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

It’s easy to blame recruiters when jobs don’t match up with one another. However, there are other places, too, where things are breaking down. I point those out as well.

Summary

Someone asked this question on Quora, not of me, but in general, I don't answer direct questions anymore. I'll just simply say that, if you'd like to ask me a question, you can through the magnifi app, or through prestoexperts.com.
The question was, "did your recruiter lie to you about what job you would get?" Okay, so I want to start by saying, recruiters are very easy to blame, and they deserve it because, frankly, some do lie. But most of the time, the quality ones are really messengers. They're messengers for an employer who's often lying to them. And they're telling you this stuff that they're told by their client.
Now, I know most of you don't want to hear that. You'd rather just blame it on the recruiter because that's easier. But, the fact of the matter is, most recruiters who have any degree of experience would rather tell you the truth, rather than wind up in a situation where, you know, you're going to go to their client, after you're on board and say, "Gee, I thought I was getting this job, and I'm now doing something else. What's that all about?" Immediately, they call up the recruiter; fire them; refuse to pay the bill, they don't make any money. It makes no sense for them to go out and lie.
And, again, some do. But most of the time with third party recruiters, the issue is around the client. The client is scamming them in some way. They're talking about this great offer opportunity, this terrific position, you've interviewed with them, too, right? They've told you the same stuff. And we're all believing it. I'm including myself in that because I did recruiting for more than 40 years.
But the fact of the matter is, number one, clients lie.
Number two is circumstances for them sometimes change between the time of the initial conversation and the time that you join.
Number three is recruiters lie.
Number four is you didn't ask good enough questions of the client in order to discern that there was an issue. So I'm pointing to those four variables, one of which is recruiters do sometimes lie, or they "finesse situations." Now, you can spot the "finesse" because they're hesitating a little bit. They are pausing. And if you have any question about whether or not you're being finessed, which a euphemism for being lied to, you can have a conversation directly with the employer and say, "I understand this is the case. Is that true? Because I didn't pick up on that in our conversations."
"Oh, no, you're not going to be doing now. You're going to be doing this."
"Is there an upside where I can get to this?"
"Oh, no."
At which point, you know, you're being lied to. So, I want to be clear again, yes, sometimes recruiters do lie. But most of the time, employers are lying to recruiters who are the messenger. And you always have the ability to verify because you're talking with their client directly. You can ask questions.
And if this isn't the offer stage where you have the offer, and they're telling you a bunch of stuff that you don't recognize as being true, because no one's mentioned it before, you can always say to the recruiter, "you know, I just want to have one last conversation with the client for about 15 minutes. I just want to cover a couple of things in it."
"What do you want to cover?"
"I've just got some questions about the role," in which case you're speaking directly with the organization. You can verify what you are being told or dismiss it as being the agent lying to you.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Why Would a Company Pay a Fee to A Recruiter? They Are So Expensive! | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Why Would a Company Pay a Fee to A Recruiter. They are So Expensive!

I think the answer is obvious but I worked in search for more than 40 years. Here’s the reason.

Summary

Having worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years, I have a perspective on answering this question… "Why would a company pay a fee to a recruiter? They are so expensive!"

When you stop and think about it for a second and look at it from a company's perspective, I will divide this between contingency a retained search firms, if they are working with a contingency recruiting firm, you can work with multiple firms and only pay the one that provides the person that was hired. That means you have a sales force available to you that is enormous out there trying to find the right talent for your firm to hire.

But still, it seems expensive. A company will pay a fee of 20%, 22.5%, 25%, 30%, 35% or even more on a contingency basis. For retained firm, is always the high end of the scale plus expenses. This seems expensive. Again, let's look at from the employer's perspective... You may have a few people doing recruiting for your firm. Some firms may work with a team of individuals who are able to source, interview, assess, and refer talent because they have a big pool of. Individuals available to them doing the recruiting.

Using IT or accounting as an example, most firms are not going to have a team of individuals that their firm. They may have one individual who is responsible for filling a certain type of role. Not only are they filling one type of job, but they are filling multiple jobs. They have to find these people.

You may say, "Just run an ad!" That's easy for you to suggest. Typically, you get many many many bad responses, hoping against hope, that one person comes through their that you want to actually talk to. You see, there is a lot of kissing frogs and talking to frogs before you decide you actually want to go out on a date with them let alone customer want to get married to them! As a result, there is a lot of time that goes into sourcing talent.. The result is a decision that you would be better served by having a bigger salesforce out there serving you to find talent and qualifying people for you.

What third-party recruiters and sourcers often do is that they are out there finding the talent and referring people for interviews. From there, companies take over and do the rest of the process. They don't do the scheduling; the 3rd party recruiter or the sourcer or might do that. It just saves them a lot of time he gets an access to a bigger pool of talent because their "sales force" is bigger.

In addition, you may be thinking of one job. They may be trying to fill 15 or 20 different types of jobs. As a result, there just isn't enough time and in the day to do that. Without a doubt, companies find it cost-effective to pay the fee on a contingency basis to whoever finds the right talent.

On a retained basis, it is different. On a retained basis, you are paying them for focused attention. They ARE going to find that person you will eventually hire. Thus, you are prepaying them a certain amount of money to purchase their attention and commitment to filling a particular job. This tends to be done for positions in a high level within an organization. C suite and senior positions in an organization will generally be put out to a retained search firm. They are definitely going to fill that job. It is cost-effective for them. Is cost-effective because they can't dedicate the resources to do everything they need to do.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Why Am I Not Getting Emails from Recruiters? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/02/15/why-am-i-not-getting-emails-from-recruiters-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1376 What can I do to start getting recruited?

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Should I Tell The Recruiter I Have A Counteroffer? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/01/08/should-i-tell-the-recruiter-i-have-a-counteroffer-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1338 Should you tell the recruiter?

Summary

Should I tell a recruiter I have a counteroffer? I want to start off with a few questions.

In telling the recruiter you have a counteroffer, what are you trying to accomplish? If you want to stay where you are, if your current employer has resolved every single reason why you decided to leave (after all, it wasn't only about earning more money; it wasn't just about getting a better job; it may have involved coworkers. It may have involved promotional opportunities), stay. What are you hoping to gain by telling the recruiter?

If the counteroffer is one where your current employer says, "We'll match the offer," that takes care of the money part of the situation. What about the rest of it?

By the way, there are two different types of recruiters. Agency recruiters and corporate recruiters. Our bill with both a little bit later. Right now, I'm talking about you and your side of this.

So, again, if they match the money, so what? There still all these other things that are problematic. I talk to people all the time you stay when the money is matched and then call me a month later and asked if I can get the previous offer back.

NO! You burned a bridge. You said yes and now you said no. They have long memories.

What you do instead is ask yourself why you would want to state an organization that's holding you back that will keep you at the same desk for a higher paycheck. If the that's the reason you are leaving, you put a gun to their head, they will remember that when review time comes along or the next time that there's a promotion and they have a choice between you and the person that was loyal. They will reward the loyal one, obviously.

Unfortunately, people are seduced by the money and start jumping for it, begging for more and forget that there were other factors important, too.

Why would you stay with an organization we had to put a gun to their head, force them to make promises that they may forget later on in order to keep you.They may change nothing once you turn down the other offer.

The second thing I want to speak to is the difference between corporate recruiter and agency recruiter in this scenario.

Agency recruiter may pull out this article called, "Counteroffers: The Road to Ruin." This is an article written many years ago in a publication for recruiters. It tries to persuade job hunters that staying in a current job instead of joining the firm they promise to join will kill your career because employers have long memories and remember the disloyalty. After all, all they've done is give you your next raise a little early, nothing changes, etc.. They will beat you up relentlessly.

You have to calmly deflect that and tell them, "Go to the client. Tell them to up the money. I'll do it for this. It has to be a little bit above. After all, how do I gain if it it's the same money?"

With a corporate recruiter, will generally seem a little more care. Agency recruiters are afraid of losing their fee, the big payday for all the work that they've done. A corporate recruiter will ask, "Why do you want to stay? What is it about your old job that's changed the makes it better than ours?"

"Well, they match the money."

"What about all those other things that they haven't improved upon??"

You may eventually get to, "Well, I need a little bit more," but when push comes to shove they will either be able to do it or not be able to do it and you will have to make a decision.

I'll end by saying if it is only the money, remember that you put a gun to their head to get it. If they change other conditions, then maybe it's worth considering. Caveat emptor. Yes, tell other recruiters but have a reasonable expectation of what you can get from it. Just know that statistically, when I've seen people stay, problems arise later on.

When you go to a new place, you start fresh with a halo around you, in some respects it's easier and in some respects it's harder.  They view you as their Savior, a solution for them a solution for them, rather than someone aggravation on a Friday afternoon by giving notice.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support,

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.