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Finding The Back Door to a Job | JobSearchTV.com


On this show, I talk about how to find the back door and avoid the front door

Summary

This is a show where will be talking about how to get to the back door, how to get the people who are the actual decision-makers, instead of being the foolish individual who is applying through the applicant tracking system, applying through human resources, yada, yada, yada.

So, firms want you to do that because, from their standpoint, they have government reporting to contend with … and that doesn't help you. That's just their meatgrinder. They put the sausage meet on the top, then they grind it and you come out the bottom predigested prechewed. It's awful. Even the best applicant tracking system, at the end of the day, is going to be largely ineffective. So, here are a couple ways to find the hiring manager and see if they can get entrée to that person, instead of doing with the company want you to do.

The 1st thing is, of course you have a network; you’ve got friends. Reach out. See if they might know the person. Know anyone who works in that firm? Check Twitter. Check Facebook. Check LinkedIn. See if you have a 1st level connection and reach out and see if they might know anything about the job and see if they might be able to supply you with on name, and email address, phone number, something along those lines.

LinkedIn. Of course, you go to LinkedIn and there's a couple of tools that you can use for searching LinkedIn beyond your 1st level connections, but, these days LinkedIn is a lot more open about this sort of stuff. You can generally get to your 1st, 2nd 3rd level connections on LinkedIn and reaching out to folks that way.

You can also, on someone's page, that you might be connected with on LinkedIn, look along the right-hand column and what you will discover is people who looked at this profile also look that such and such’s profile. And the result winds up being you get even more contacts to reach out to. I want to remind you that you don't have to do it through LinkedIn. Call them. How do you get their phone number? Simple. Do what recruiters do. You pick up the phone, call the firm and try to connect.

If they have a a voice response system, work your way through the voice response system. Is that so tough? You type in the letters of the person's name. See if they’ll give you an extension or just connect you right through. When you get through just simply say, “we hi ! My name is I’m . . . I’m looking for a job at your firm. Would you happen to know so-and-so?” This is if you are not going through to that person you just found on LinkedIn or if you are trying to get to the hiring manager. “Could you point me to the person who heads the function or heads up programming, accounting engineering”, what have you.”

Then, you go to that individual and see if you can network your way through the admin, through to the individual to the actual hiring manager. If you get to that individual (CIO CTO, CFO, whomever) that has that C-level designation, what you do is really very simple.

“Hi! My name is . . . This is what I do. I understand your firm is trying to hire such and such. Who is the person I should reach out to? Not HR, but the actual hiring manager?”

“Why don’t you want to talk to HR? That's the way we do things around here?”

“Well, all that is going to happen is I am going to submit a resume to them and they’re going to be a filter and, maybe, submit it to them. Of course, interviewers miss resumes so I can send it to both. I would be happy to do that. I'd like to get the name of the hiring manager and, when I submit the resume, HR will see that I've copied them on it so they will see, I’m not trying to circumvent them. I just want to communicate with the hiring manager, have them get my resume, respond or not.

Your resume may stink vis-à-vis there job. Lord knows, most resumes I see are in no way shape or form qualified but this is the way you approach it if he actually are qualified.

If you are just a going to be sending out stupid resumes for sport because you think you want to work for this firm but you have nothing relates to what they're looking for, you will be wasting your time and their time.

But, this is assuming that you have qualifications that will matter to this firm that is trying to fill a position. So, what you are trying to do is get to the C-level individual in an organization and have them direct you down and, when you make that call, to that hiring manager, you just simply say, “Jennifer so-and-so gave me your name and number.” Or, “Her office gave me your name and number.” Or, in the case of a friend or family member, “I was referred by so-and-so who told me you were involved with hiring for this position.” Then, you going into a quick commercial about your background and how it fits with you organization’s looking for..

Another way to circumvent the meat grinder (or the sausage maker as some people refer to it) see if you can find your way through the corporate website to different people. In doing that, generally, you're going to get executives but, sometimes you look for a PR person. Sometimes you can find someone investor relations and, through them, get pointed to the right person.

I know in work that I've done in the way of business development to develop client relationships with firms, one of the best tactics has always been you go to investor relations or public relations with the firm. But, again, you're making phone calls. Don't send email! They are not going to respond.

Another way you can find out (this is going to depend on your level of seniority), think in terms of a school's Alumni Association. You can reach out through the Alumni Association, be told who went to your school who is working at that firm. But, they may not be motivated and certainly not get back to you promptly. Remember to think in terms of the importance of promptness because, all the while, people are applying for jobs and getting on this person's schedule. Eventually, this person’s calendar is going to get full. You have to act quickly and the easiest way get alumni information is on LinkedIn. There is a drop-down box. Go across the ribbon along the top and I believe it's either in the profile area or , “find people.”… something along those lines. Just go through the ribbon along the top that is in black with white print. You will find the drop down for people who have gone to your school who work at this organization and then reach out to them. Begin to make phone calls. Talk to people. “I’m trying to do some networking. I’m trying to find who the hiring manager is for this role. Can you point me to this individual?”

And, again, if you not getting through to this person, you can always try to get through the admin for the individual.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

When Applying on LinkedIn, Should You Also InMail the Recruiter? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1011 Before listening,  answer the question and then learn the best way.

Summary

"When employing for a job on LinkedIn, should I also inMail the person who posted it as well?"

I go crazy when I hear the stuff because the answer was invariably come down to how someone would be perceived. They are seen as being savvy if they did this.  You must really like the company. If you follow up with an inMail.  Man!  This is all the propaganda that LinkedIn tries to put out and it isn't true! 

Here is what you want to do.  You see a firm that is advertising on LinkedIn. There is a name of their, right?  Don't go through the conveyor belt.  Don't get on the conveyor belt where your resume is delivered to the applicant tracking system.  Instead, here is what you do.

You call up the firm, get the extension of that individual or the direct dial number and you call them.  You say to them, "I was doing some networking and someone mentioned you might be trying to hire someone with…" And you describe the role.  "I don't know if that's true or not but if it is I would like to talk with you about the position and see how I might be able to be of help."  That's if you are taking the "semi-better way."  That is, generally, HR people run advertising on LinkedIn.

Here is the better way.  Try to locate the hiring manager at that firm.  How do you do that?  You try to figure out the title and go to the corporate page and see if you are connected to other people who might be at that firm.  Not connected on the corporate page?  There are chrome extensions that will help you.

For example, there is one called Prophet that will help you identify people and their email addresses.  By the way, with these, they will help you with email addresses. But what you also try to do is do Google searches to identify people at that firm because Google will search for public profiles of individuals.

Here is a simpler way.  There is a site whose address is LI-USA.info.  It is a Google custom search engine that only searches LinkedIn public profiles in the United States.  So you might just simply search by name of the company.  Then see if you might detect the title structure from the responses.  Let's say the person is with Facebook or Goldman Sachs or Centerville or whomever it is.  See if you can detect the title structure from the responses you start.  Then, from their used tools like PROPHET, Connectifier, Lusha… These are chrome extensions that will help you find people. Candidate.ai is another one.

What you are trying to do is to find the people within an organization who might be the hiring manager.  You might just simply say, "Hi!  I understand it might be a particular position open for a such and such. Would you happen to know who the hiring manager is?"  

"No, I don't know"

"Is there someone you might be able to point me to who might be able to help and give me an idea of who the right person might be?"

Again, what you are trying to do is find the right individual at that organization who can help with finding the person and network your way into her direct contact.  Yes, it involves some more work, but let's be practical.  If you get on the conveyor belt of the applicant tracking system, do you remember what that is called?  The black hole.  What is the point of going through that exercise?

Instead, follow through by trying to find the hiring manager and connecting with them, instead of going to getting on the conveyor belt to your resume's demise.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Why Do Applications Ask You Questions When The Resume Has All the Answers?

Why Do Applications Ask You Questions When The Resume Has All the Answers?


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/02/05/why-do-applications-ask-you-questions-when-the-resume-has-all-the-answers

EP 1006 I explain what your part in this may be . .  .and what their part is, too.

Summary

So why do online applications ask you to fill in particular fields?  Why did they ask you questions when your resume has all the answers?

Starts off with the fact that employers, particularly large ones, but actually any employer as government reporting requirements in order to ensure that they don't conduct themselves in a discriminatory manner.  It's not as though there is anything personalized about this, but the statistics show that they interview (I'm just picking numbers at random) 100 people from a diverse population (a non-white male population) and 100 people are rejected. The government has the opportunity to say, "Huh. That's interesting.  Let's explore more deeply."

In the US at least, government requires that firms maintain certain types of data.  Let's go beyond that.

When you upload a resume and the system attempts to parse it, your resume may not be in a format or in a type font that that is easily readable by the system.

Catch that one again.

This is your part of the equation.  It may not be easily readable or in a type font that is parsable by their system.  As a result, you have to fill in certain fields.  Whether it is name or address fields that the system is just not able to read, your email address, the system has a concern.

Some applicant tracking systems asked the county in which you live. I have no idea why they need this information when so many systems are set up so that they can search by a radius of a particular ZIP Code.  Some are ridiculous and will ask for the county.  I think a moron design the form I forgot that people are human and not your sheep.  That one has nothing to do with government reporting.

The real reasons are (#1) your resume was not readable.

2. They may be asking for ridiculous things like the example of the county which isn't going to be anywhere in your resume.  Without that city, state or ZIP Code field

3.  I think this is a valid one.  So many people are not including addresses, so there is no city, state or ZIP Code information on a resume.  They are giving just a name, email address and phone number when they submit the resume.  If a person is doing a search in her applicant tracking system for someone with a particular background, they are never going to find you.  Without that city, state and ZIP Code field, without a phone number or mobile number (Remember that area codes of the phone number don't necessarily correlate to where you live), how did they find you?

It's very possible that your lack of an address is causing the system to request this information so that they can find you again.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Should I Apply to Jobs Through My LinkedIn Profile or My Resume? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/05/15/should-i-apply-to-jobs-through-my-linkedin-profile-or-my-resume

EP 1105 Which is the better way to apply for jobs on LinkedIn?  It is my opinion.

Summary

I was asked the question that translates into, "Show. I applying for jobs with my LinkedIn profile or submit a resume?"

When I spoke about how the job market works these days, what I have spoken about in the past applies here as well. Resumes are for when you are hunting and LinkedIn profiles for when you are the hunted. I want to explain why which I normally don't go into.

The reason is that your profile is going to be pretty static if the role, if you submit your profile with a few tweaks for every job, by the time someone gets the your profile, it may be different than what you submitted to them because you are tweaking it for each submission. LinkedIn will deliver the most current iteration of your profile.

The problem comes down to the fact that you have one profile, you are not necessarily addressing that which the hiring firm is interested. It becomes like having a standard resume and submitting it everywhere. The broken watch is right twice a day, right? Well, your LinkedIn profile is going to be right. some of the time, but more can go into it.

For example, when you look at your profile, there are things that relate to your background that might be highlighted in PowerPoints that you link to, a video or an article that you connect to that someone is not necessarily going to see because they might look at the standard resume kind of stuff, right?

The real issue comes down to the resume is a document that can be tweaked, as a result, you can tailor it to demonstrate more of how you fit then your profile can.

So I would encourage you that instead of submitting your profile, submit a tailored resume, not the same generic resume because if you do that,, you might as well submit your profile. Submitting a profile isn't ideal from the employer's perspective on either because it doesn't offer information about how to contact you. When people send their profiles you have to reply back to the LinkedIn system an offer that takes too much time. I want to call people and get going with things and not act like a clerk and sending stuff to the government,, you know what I mean?

To me, if you are applying, that is you being active. For you, if you are active, you are better off using a resume and a LinkedIn profile. That's because you can tailor it to what a firm is looking for, Rather than submitting the same LinkedIn profile over and over again.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Is It Rude to Contact The Hiring Manager Directly & Ask Them Out for Coffee? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1111 Is it rude to contact the hiring manager of a job posting directly and inviting them for a coffee to ask more about the job?

Summary

I was asked the question that I thought was great. "Is it rude to contact the hiring manager of a job posting directly and invite them for coffee? I want to ask them more about the job." Then they go on to say, "I found this opportunity that is everything that I'm looking for. I feel that I can deliver however, they ask for 10 years of experience and I bring only 3 years of direct experience with the role and 5 years of overall work experience. I feel like I am better off contacting the hiring manager to ask the more questions."

Is it rude? Absolutely not!

Is it likely to be responded to favorably? Absolutely not! Let me explain why.

I want you to put yourself in the position of the hiring manager and not the job hunter. They have an absolute stranger invite them for coffee in order to ask them questions and they are not qualified for the role.

Why do I say they are not qualified for the role? Real simple. A person with 5 years of experience has a different level of experience and competence in most organizations than someone with 10. They usually have managed people. They may have some of the experience with the functionality from a staff perspective, but not for me, leadership or management perspective.

Thus, when you say you have 3 years of, direct experience and 5 years overall, what you're telling me is that you don't fit the job and you want to try to talk your way into it. Before he or she is going to agree to anything, the hiring manager if they have half a brain in their head is going to say, "not quite yet. Can I see a copy of your resume? I need to see whether it is going to be worth my time."

Now, if your background screams that you fit this job, yeah, they will be happy to meet you for coffee because they are going to turn it into an interview and, yes, you will have time to ask questions, but, unless you follow some of my advice, it will be at the end of the interview when they have already evaluated you.

So, is it rude? Absolutely not!

Is it likely to be responded to favorably? Absolutely not!

That's because you are not qualified… You know this already. You are to Junior for the role. And, by the way, from a language perspective (and I'm not trying to be rude in any way), people use the word, "feel," when they should be saying, "think."

"I feel I would be qualified."
"I feel I would be better."

Instead of just saying, "I think I would be better," or, "I think I would be qualified."

When you use the word "feel," you reveal that you are insecure about yourself in the context of the situation and your capability around something. So you cop to the word "feel" instead of the word, "think." Switch your language here and be more direct.

"I feel like can deliver," isn't true. You think you can deliver. Your feeling about whether you can deliver is irrelevant to the hiring manager because they have no data that allows them to determine whether you can deliver. Think you can deliver. Think that you are better. These are accurate statements about what you can do for the hiring manager.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Should I Apply to Jobs Through My LinkedIn Profile or My Resume? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1105 Which is the better way to apply for jobs on LinkedIn?  This is my opinion.

Summary

I was asked the question that translates into, "Show. I applying for jobs with my LinkedIn profile or submit a resume?"

When I spoke about how the job market works these days, what I have spoken about in the past applies here as well. Resumes are for when you are hunting and LinkedIn profiles for when you are the hunted. I want to explain why which I normally don't go into.

The reason is that your profile is going to be pretty static if the role, if you submit your profile with a few tweaks for every job, by the time someone gets the your profile, it may be different than what you submitted to them because you are tweaking it for each submission. LinkedIn will deliver the most current iteration of your profile.

The problem comes down to the fact that you have one profile, you are not necessarily addressing that which the hiring firm is interested. It becomes like having a standard resume and submitting it everywhere. The broken watch is right twice a day, right? Well, your LinkedIn profile is going to be right. some of the time, but more can go into it.

For example, when you look at your profile, there are things that relate to your background that might be highlighted in PowerPoints that you link to, a video or an article that you connect to that someone is not necessarily going to see because they might look at the standard resume kind of stuff, right?

The real issue comes down to the resume is a document that can be tweaked, as a result, you can tailor it to demonstrate more of how you fit then your profile can.

So I would encourage you that instead of submitting your profile, submit a tailored resume, not the same generic resume because if you do that,, you might as well submit your profile. Submitting a profile isn't ideal from the employer's perspective on either because it doesn't offer information about how to contact you. When people send their profiles you have to reply back to the LinkedIn system an offer that takes too much time. I want to call people and get going with things and not act like a clerk and sending stuff to the government,, you know what I mean?

To me, if you are applying, that is you being active. For you, if you are active, you are better off using a resume and a LinkedIn profile. That's because you can tailor it to what a firm is looking for, Rather than submitting the same LinkedIn profile over and over again.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

How Do I Find Out Why My Job Application Has Been Rejected? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1045 I should be a perfectly viable candidate, but I get no indication whatsoever why I get rejected. 

Summary

here's a question for today: How do I find out why my job application has been rejected? I'm going to paraphrase the next part. I have sent out over100 applications to various positions across my field and 90% of them have been rejected. The other 10%, I never hear from again even if I follow-up. For most of those applications I would be a perfectly viable candidate but I get no indication why I was rejected.

The person then goes back to talk about what career services told him. Career services knows nothing. They have never fill the job in their life, offer pablum advice but I digress.

What's the issue here? How can this person find out why their application has been rejected? I'm going to answer the question for them because there are really only a few reasons why an application is rejected.

The first one is that they sought better-looking resumes.What made them better looking resumes? Well, when you see a job ad, that position may have already been online for a month and they are deep into the hiring process. You got to it late.

Number two. Let's say you found that on the first day was posted and they have just been inundated with responses and they've chosen better fitting candidates or resumes for these roles.

Number three. You did nothing to tailor your resume to demonstrate how you actually fit for the job.

The most likely alternative is the second one – – they saw better resumes.Here's what I say that.

For a student resume (I'm going to get to you more experienced people in a little bit to start with students first),

What is your resume say? You have a few internships and went to a particular school, got certain grades and took particular classes.

Man, that's boring! Unless some of those internships were spectacular (I'm sure some of you had great internships, but most were pretty mundane), some of these people are ahead of you on line, particularly if you went to an average school– – We have no idea of your experience so it's hard to be particular for you.

For you experienced people, is number three (you did nothing to demonstrate your fit for the job). That's the most common mistake that experienced people make.

Students are often given a load of crap by career services about how wonderful their school is, how great a job it does preparing people for graduation… And they are lying. Career services knows nothing about how well prepared you are or any of the graduates are. The next time they go out and talk to a business about how their academic program matches up with that businesses needs will be the first time that ever happens.

So, for students, your background isn't as wonderful as you have been led to believe. For experienced people, you have to tailor your resume to demonstrate a fit for the job that you are applying for; that's the most common reason why you are being projected; you never made a case for your candidacy and how your experience fits the firm that you are applying to.

Your resume is awful vis-à-vis the job you're applying for. As I've said many times before, your resume is like the broken watch that's right twice a day. Yes, you will get some interviews. To use the example of the student, he or she gets 10 interviews out of 100.

Why doesn't he get 100 out of 100? Who knows!

For you, you keep sending that same resume out over and over and, if my inbox is any indicator, a lot of you are sending out little more than spam.

I want to encourage you to tailor your resume to demonstrate your fit. As a student, I want you to go into detail about the program you went to, how wonderful it was, what you learn there, and try to find something in your background that will distinguish it from the other thousand resumes that they are going to be receiving.

By that I don't only mean the appearance; I mean the content as well.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 1 month free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

When Applying on LinkedIn, Should You Also InMail the Recruiter? | JobSearchTV.com


Before watching, answer the question and then learn the best way.

Summary

"When employing for a job on LinkedIn, should I also inMail the person who posted it as well?"

I go crazy when I hear the stuff because the answer was invariably come down to how someone would be perceived. They are seen as being savvy if they did this.  You must really like the company. If you follow up with an inMail.  Man!  This is all the propaganda that LinkedIn tries to put out and it isn't true! 

Here is what you want to do.  You see a firm that is advertising on LinkedIn. There is a name of their, right?  Don't go through the conveyor belt.  Don't get on the conveyor belt where your resume is delivered to the applicant tracking system.  Instead, here is what you do.

You call up the firm, get the extension of that individual or the direct dial number and you call them.  You say to them, "I was doing some networking and someone mentioned you might be trying to hire someone with…" And you describe the role.  "I don't know if that's true or not but if it is I would like to talk with you about the position and see how I might be able to be of help."  That's if you are taking the "semi-better way."  That is, generally, HR people run advertising on LinkedIn.

Here is the better way.  Try to locate the hiring manager at that firm.  How do you do that?  You try to figure out the title and go to the corporate page and see if you are connected to other people who might be at that firm.  Not connected on the corporate page?  There are chrome extensions that will help you.

For example, there is one called Prophet that will help you identify people and their email addresses.  By the way, with these, they will help you with email addresses. But what you also try to do is do Google searches to identify people at that firm because Google will search for public profiles of individuals.

Here is a simpler way.  There is a site whose address is LI-USA.info.  It is a Google custom search engine that only searches LinkedIn public profiles in the United States.  So you might just simply search by name of the company.  Then see if you might detect the title structure from the responses.  Let's say the person is with Facebook or Goldman Sachs or Centerville or whomever it is.  See if you can detect the title structure from the responses you start.  Then, from their used tools like PROPHET, Connectifier, Lusha… These are chrome extensions that will help you find people. Candidate.ai is another one.

What you are trying to do is to find the people within an organization who might be the hiring manager.  You might just simply say, "Hi!  I understand it might be a particular position open for a such and such. Would you happen to know who the hiring manager is?"  

"No, I don't know"

"Is there someone you might be able to point me to who might be able to help and give me an idea of who the right person might be?"

Again, what you are trying to do is find the right individual at that organization who can help with finding the person and network your way into her direct contact.  Yes, it involves some more work, but let's be practical.  If you get on the conveyor belt of the applicant tracking system, do you remember what that is called?  The black hole.  What is the point of going through that exercise?

Instead, follow through by trying to find the hiring manager and connecting with them, instead of going to getting on the conveyor belt to your resume's demise.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Why Do Applications Ask You Questions When The Resume Has All the Answers?

Why Do Applications Ask You Questions When The Resume Has All the Answers? | TheBigGameHunterTV


I explain what your part in this may be . . .and what th

Summary

So why do online applications ask you to fill in particular fields?  Why did they ask you questions when your resume has all the answers?

Starts off with the fact that employers, particularly large ones, but actually any employer as government reporting requirements in order to ensure that they don't conduct themselves in a discriminatory manner.  It's not as though there is anything personalized about this, but the statistics show that they interview (I'm just picking numbers at random) 100 people from a diverse population (a non-white male population) and 100 people are rejected. The government has the opportunity to say, "Huh. That's interesting.  Let's explore more deeply."

In the US at least, government requires that firms maintain certain types of data.  Let's go beyond that.

When you upload a resume and the system attempts to parse it, your resume may not be in a format or in a type font that that is easily readable by the system.

Catch that one again.

This is your part of the equation.  It may not be easily readable or in a type font that is parsable by their system.  As a result, you have to fill in certain fields.  Whether it is name or address fields that the system is just not able to read, your email address, the system has a concern.

Some applicant tracking systems asked the county in which you live. I have no idea why they need this information when so many systems are set up so that they can search by a radius of a particular ZIP Code.  Some are ridiculous and will ask for the county.  I think a moron design the form I forgot that people are human and not your sheep.  That one has nothing to do with government reporting.

The real reasons are (#1) your resume was not readable.

2. They may be asking for ridiculous things like the example of the county which isn't going to be anywhere in your resume.  Without that city, state or ZIP Code field

3.  I think this is a valid one.  So many people are not including addresses, so there is no city, state or ZIP Code information on a resume.  They are giving just a name, email address and phone number when they submit the resume.  If a person is doing a search in her applicant tracking system for someone with a particular background, they are never going to find you.  Without that city, state and ZIP Code field, without a phone number or mobile number (Remember that area codes of the phone number don't necessarily correlate to where you live), how did they find you?

It's very possible that your lack of an address is causing the system to request this information so that they can find you again.

eir part is, too.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

What Is The Best Day & Time of Day to Email a Resume and Cover Letter to a Recruiter? | JobSearchTV.com


My answer probably isn’t what you expect.

Summary

When is the best time and day to email a resume and cover letter to a recruiter?

That is the question for today. Let me start off by asking, why are you sending it to recruiter? Why not just try to find the hiring manager?

The hiring managers the actual decision-maker who's going to make the choice about whether or not you're actually going to be interviewed. Some recruiters may do that so why not go directly to the hiring manager? That's point number 1.

Point number 2 is, "But I can't find the hiring manager!"

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has some tips about how to do that.

3rd. If you insist upon sending it to the recruiter, I saw one opinion it's a Tuesday through Thursday night from 9 PM or later. Why? The opinion is because it is waiting in the inbox for the recruiter to say 1st thing in the morning when he or she walks in.

Maybe a sense of what happens from a recruiters perspective. This is a corporate recruiter for more well-known firm who spoke at an organization. They are well known, well regarded, well-liked, and I don't know what her day is like, but that 9 o'clock, email is pretty well buried in my inbox when I walked in the door.

I'm getting stuff sent to me all night long from people who are trying to get my attention. If there is someone sending it to me at 9 PM, is also summing sending it to me at 1 o'clock in the morning. At 2 o'clock in the morning. At 3 AM. At 4 AM. At 3:05 AM. At 3:07 AM. On and on and on until the next morning.

It is my suggestion. Instead of playing that game of being the 1st 1 in the inbox to be noticed, consider conceding that time because, in my case, let's say there are 50 messages I walk into on a Tuesday morning (it's actually more than that) or a Wednesday morning, I will start off with the top few of them and the one sent to me at 6 PM the night before… I won't see them right away. I'm not starting with the oldest 1 1st. I'm starting with the more recent 1 1st… I'm kind of working my way down.

Then new stuff comes in and I'm responding to, and then I'm going to the older stuff. Newer than older.

My thought is that instead of sending for a 9 AM arrival where we are playing that game, send it for a 10:30 AM or 11 AM arrival. Monday you could go later morning than that, like 11:30 AM, noon, or 12:30 PM arrival.

Or Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday… Do it then. Don't do it for 9 AM. Do it for later in the morning where people have a chance to get caught up on some things. Mondays may be hard because they do on boarding, or they may have 3 days worth of emails (Friday after close of business, Saturday, Sunday or early Monday morning). You don't want to be competing with all those.

My thought is late mornings are ideal. It could even be late morning early afternoon on Monday. Tuesday Wednesday Thursday – – mid-to-late morning. Friday, do not send it in the afternoon. You are better using Outlook to delay the send of your resume and cover letter. By using delay/send, your preventing yourself from being caught up in the weekend emails but so that it arrives on the following Monday.

I get calls from people on Friday at 5:30 PM as though I'm waiting around to have a detailed conversation with someone Friday at 5:30 PM or 6:30 PM or 7:30 PM! It's bizarre! Are you sitting around waiting for recruiters to call you? Why do you think I'm so excited to be talking to you at those times?

Again, think of what it's like to be the recipient of your contact. Pick times that are relevant (which is what I've been suggesting here) and work within those frameworks.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.