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NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

What Is The Best Day & Time to Email a Resume And Cover Letter to a Recruiter | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/13/what-is-the-best-day-time-to-email-a-resume-and-cover-letter-to-a-recruiter

EP 1285 My answer probably isn’t what you expect.

Summary

When is the best time and day to email a resume and cover letter to a recruiter?

That is the question for today. Let me start off by asking, why are you sending it to recruiter? Why not just try to find the hiring manager?

The hiring managers the actual decision-maker who's going to make the choice about whether or not you're actually going to be interviewed. Some recruiters may do that so why not go directly to the hiring manager? That's point number 1.

Point number 2 is, "But I can't find the hiring manager!"

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has some tips about how to do that.

3rd. If you insist upon sending it to the recruiter, I saw one opinion it's a Tuesday through Thursday night from 9 PM or later. Why? The opinion is because it is waiting in the inbox for the recruiter to say 1st thing in the morning when he or she walks in.

Maybe a sense of what happens from a recruiters perspective. This is a corporate recruiter for more well-known firm who spoke at an organization. They are well known, well regarded, well-liked, and I don't know what her day is like, but that 9 o'clock, email is pretty well buried in my inbox when I walked in the door.

I'm getting stuff sent to me all night long from people who are trying to get my attention. If there is someone sending it to me at 9 PM, is also summing sending it to me at 1 o'clock in the morning. At 2 o'clock in the morning. At 3 AM. At 4 AM. At 3:05 AM. At 3:07 AM. On and on and on until the next morning.

It is my suggestion. Instead of playing that game of being the 1st 1 in the inbox to be noticed, consider conceding that time because, in my case, let's say there are 50 messages I walk into on a Tuesday morning (it's actually more than that) or a Wednesday morning, I will start off with the top few of them and the one sent to me at 6 PM the night before… I won't see them right away. I'm not starting with the oldest 1 1st. I'm starting with the more recent 1 1st… I'm kind of working my way down.

Then new stuff comes in and I'm responding to, and then I'm going to the older stuff. Newer than older.

My thought is that instead of sending for a 9 AM arrival where we are playing that game, send it for a 10:30 AM or 11 AM arrival. Monday you could go later morning than that, like 11:30 AM, noon, or 12:30 PM arrival.

Or Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday… Do it then. Don't do it for 9 AM. Do it for later in the morning where people have a chance to get caught up on some things. Mondays may be hard because they do on boarding, or they may have 3 days worth of emails (Friday after close of business, Saturday, Sunday or early Monday morning). You don't want to be competing with all those.

My thought is late mornings are ideal. It could even be late morning early afternoon on Monday. Tuesday Wednesday Thursday – – mid-to-late morning. Friday, do not send it in the afternoon. You are better using Outlook to delay the send of your resume and cover letter. By using delay/send, your preventing yourself from being caught up in the weekend emails but so that it arrives on the following Monday.

I get calls from people on Friday at 5:30 PM as though I'm waiting around to have a detailed conversation with someone Friday at 5:30 PM or 6:30 PM or 7:30 PM! It's bizarre! Are you sitting around waiting for recruiters to call you? Why do you think I'm so excited to be talking to you at those times?

Again, think of what it's like to be the recipient of your contact. Pick times that are relevant (which is what I've been suggesting here) and work within those frameworks.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Should I Apply for a Job At Half My Previous Salary? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/30/should-i-apply-for-a-job-at-half-my-previous-salary-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1271 Should I apply for a job at half the salary I once earned given I’m almost 60 and the options are slim?

Summary

Here's a question I received through quora.   I want to read the full question..

"Should apply for job at half the salary I once earned, given that I'm almost 60 and the options are slim?"

We don't know what this person does professionally;  we just know that they don't have choices.

So I get a look at a few scenarios.  You make $150,000 per year And want to look at a job paying $75,000 per year.  You are a $200,000 a year person  looking at a job paying $100,000 per year.  You are a $100,000 a year person looking at a job paying  50.

Here's the reality to it.  In most of these scenarios, you're not qualified to do the job  at a lower level, nor firm is going to hire you because they are not going to trust whether or not  you are going to jump ship when the market for what you do gets better.

I want to help you and, I have said this in videos that I've done, if you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume.  If you are getting interviews and not invited back, the problem is you don't interview as well as you think you do.  If you are being invited back for 2nd interviews but not getting job offers, you don't have good relationship skills with senior professionals.  Lastly,  if the situation  is that you are getting offers are coming in  lower than what you wanted, you may not be the 1st choice and they are basically saying, "Screw it.  Let's give him a shot and see if he will come in at a lesser price."

It's easy to blame the market Again, we don't know what you do..  Perhaps, you don't have skills that are particularly viable. After all, you may be a $50,000 a year person looking at jobs paying $25,000 per year. That's possible, for example, in social work where you may be a manager at an agency, and are now looking at positions as a caseworker.  You can do that.  You will probably need some refresher because you have been doing oversight for people and haven't been sitting opposite someone Doing case management for a long time.

Recognize that, as a more experienced person, you may no longer have the qualifications  to do the staff level position and you are going to need to be proactive to get the skills up to speed in order to be effective.

So, again, you can do it, but it is not likely to work.

You also say that the opportunities are relatively slim..  I am going to work with another assumption here.

You are passively bringing age discrimination into the conversation and you are using that as the excuse for why you are not getting hired.   It is certainly possible, but, more than likely,, you are not selling yourself real well when you are meeting with the younger manager, either male or female. You are looking across the desk and thinking, "Shit!  They are 30 years old.  They are not going to be interested in me." That's going on in your subconscious and, unfortunately, that's a mistake. There are ways to deal with that issue  but you are not going  into the interview "all in."

That's what you need to be.  All in in these situations.

Hear me out.  Try it.   Go all in.  Push yourself. Don't cop to the belief that it's 60 you're not employable.  I speak from the perspective of  being older than you are and  have worked in search for more than 40 years.  People  would hire me in a heartbeat because they know how talented and successful I am. On an interview, you have to make sure they learn how talented you are.

So get out there  and raise some cane on your interviews and don't use excuses.

Now there was one other phrase that you used – – "options are slim."

You may only be looking on job boards.   When you only look at job boards, there are a finite number of jobs.  You are not out there doing network.  You are staring at the same things coming up over and over again  and saying to yourself, "the options are slim."

In fact, job boards fill, depending upon the statistics you look at, 3 to 6% of all positions..  Recruiters fill another 20 to 25%..  Between the 2, they fill between 30 and 32% of all positions.  The rest are filled by networking.   Of those, approximately 70%, The statistics also say 70% of the 70%  are filled as a result of introductions to people That you didn't know at the beginning of the job search.

You have to go network. You need to talk to people and be referred  to absolute strangers and practice doing informational interviews and practice networking. Get out there.  No excuses.  Don't surrendering to this,, "oh woe is me,," attitude that is implicit in your question. Get hungry again.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice

Using Video at the Time of Application | No BS HIring Advice Radio


Jeff Altman,The Big Game Hunter discusses using video at the time a job hunter applies to your firm.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about video interviewing and suggest an idea to you that I think might be worth exploring in your budget.
Now. It comes from an interview. I did with someone named Chip Luman, who's a founder of a company called HireVue. I want to be clear, I'm not a paid spokesperson. I'm not compensated in any way for this video and you can check out any number of competing products to theirs.
But, the idea that I liked about the approach his firm was taking starts off with, number one, what's called asymmetrical interviews. That is, you have a candidate that you're interested in or wants to apply to your job . . . That's the better scenario. . . . They want to apply to your job. You provide them with a video link with a series of questions to answer that they can handle at the time of application.
Why is this so worthwhile? Because it cuts through a lot of the noise. A lot of people won't do it because they suddenly realize they're not qualified. Number two is it standardizes the base interview so, this way, your firm can't be accused of bias unless they're bigoted questions, of course, but because the interviews are standardized, there becomes a way that everyone's ask the same question.
Different people in your organization can watch the results and get a better feel for the person and their knowledge plus, from the job hunter perspective, they can do it at their convenience using a smartphone like this one. So, what it allows you to do is get what you need in the way of information faster and earlier than most because you don't have to go through the back and forth of the scheduling of the initial phone interview because you're getting basic information right away that allows you to discern whether or not people are a fit.
Now, again, if someone in your organization is going to look at all the resumes of a person with one ethnic background and rule them out, you obviously have a problem. But if you set up a system that allows you to have different people reviewing all the videos that you'll receive, the videos going to have 30 seconds answers. Like, there's another service that I'm trying out now called CandidateBroker. Person sees the job description. They apply. You can set up a period of time where they can wind up answering questions at the time of application that I can watch and get a feel for whether or not the person is qualified.
Nice systems. Saves time. Yes, there's going to be some expense for each of them but ,at the end of the day. You'll have some cost savings and, I know in the case of hirevue, they have an analytics system that will analyze the video responses based upon the backgrounds and the answers the people in your organization, give or successful hires have given, discern whether or not someone is worth talking to. A nice little feature.

So, explore some of the services that are out there. Doing video interviewing of employees at the time of application. I think you'll find its an interesting idea and will be a big money saver.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

 

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Is It OK To Email Several Recruiters About The Same Job? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/12/01/is-it-ok-to-email-several-recruiters-about-the-same-job

EP 1302 Well, it depends . . .

Summary

The question is, "is it okay to email several recruiters about the same job?" As usual, the answer is, "It depends."

It depends on whether you know for sure that they are all represented the same job. If the language is identical, DUH! It's the same job. The question then becomes,, "Why would you do that?"

Let's say you email the corporate recruiter and then you start emailing agencies. The corporate recruiters reclaim ownership of your candidacy. They are not going to accept the referral. There's no point in doing it UNLESS you. Let a few days go by so. It is not fresh in. their mind that they might've received the resume. You may not be in their applicant tracking system yet. Contacting a third party recruiter at that point makes sense. So, give you 3 days. If you haven't heard from you corporate recruiter, contact an agency recruiter.

Next. Multiple agency recruiters. "Applying" is 1 of those ambiguous terms doesn't mean that you send your resume to someone? Yes, it is okay to do that. The next question becomes that is soon as you start talking to 1 of the recruiters determine if they are going to submit you. If they are, there is no need for the others. If they aren't, ask why and, if another recruiter contacts you, very simply, you haven't been submitted yet, go ahead! Talk to a 2nd recruiter about it or a third. It doesn't mean you are going to get the interview.

What it does mean is that the 1st person said, "No," the 2nd person may have also said, "No," you may not fit. What are you hitting your head against the wall for?

If you legitimately fit, it begs the question, what did they not see your background or and how you presented yourself that cause them to think you did not fit? You have to learn from them from interview 1 to interview 2 and if you still haven't gotten the message yet, you certainly have to do it by interview 3.

Recognize that if you are not selling yourself properly to the 1st person, yes, you should be speaking to a 2nd. If you're not selling yourself well by interview 2, you better do it by interview 3 because what are you doing??? This is what my site, JobSearchCoachingHQ.com does. It really helps to prepare you for interviewing. It helps with resumes. It helps launch your search. It helps you with interviewing. It helps you with tough interview questions to prepare for. It helps with talking to recruiters. On and on and on those great content available to you at the site. So, I would encourage you that if you are struggling trying to figure out what you are doing wrong, number 1, joint. Number 2 is asked me once you have joined.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Is One Click Apply a Good Thing For You To Use? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/26/is-one-click-apply-a-good-thing-for-you-to-use-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1267 Is one click apply good for you to use?

Summary

More and more sites use the feature of one-click apply to make it easy for you to apply for a position.… But should you actually use it? Is one click apply actually a useful tool for you as the job hunter? Let me explain what happens with one click apply and the two ways that is offered.

First, when you are on a job board like Indeed, and they say, "you've uploaded a resume to us and we will forward it on to the employer." Here's what happens behind the scenes. They are sending that same generic resumes to every job. It's like the broken watch that is right twice a day; that resume may or may not actually demonstrate the fit for the job and you haven't done anything to customize your resume. That can be a problem for you, costing you an opportunity.

In addition, when they send a resume, they don't have your address there. They have city, state but no ZIP Code. You may think, "What is the big problem?" The issue is they submit the resume for you and even uploaded to a database or applicant tracking system that is on the recipient's side. Without the ZIP Code, no one will ever find you again when other positions open up at that firm.

"Huh?"

No one will ever find you. Let me give you a perspective.

Let's say, you apply to a position of mine and the resume doesn't have your ZIP Code. How my going to find you in my system?

"You search by skills."

No. I search by skills and location. Without a ZIP Code, I don't have your location.

"Why can't you look me up by city?"

Databases don't work that way. They are set up to search by a certain radius of a particular location as defined by ZIP Code. The result is you are lost forever and become invisible to me.

"I have submitted to a local recruiter!"

They do the same thing. I will use New York as an example. I have a job in Manhattan and if I search for people within a 50 mile radius of Manhattan, the databases all search by ZIP Code. How will I find you?

"They will search everything."

But they won't do that. They search by ZIP Code. So, you are lost to them. They won't find you.

Another way sites do it is by taking your LinkedIn profile and submitting it for the job. Take a look at your LinkedIn profile. That's thinner than your resume. It certainly isn't customized to the job. The result is that you are basically dumping spam on people.

For most job hunters, one click apply is a convenience that isn't effective. It isn't something that will get you more interviews; it will allow you to submit more resumes and give you the feeling like you're doing "stuff," but it's not going to give you the results that you want.

So I want to discourage you from using one click apply and, instead, take note of the job, submit a customized resume for it and go from there. It will be far more effective.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Applying for Two Different Types of Jobs at the Same Company | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/22/applying-for-two-different-types-of-jobs-at-the-same-company

EP 1263 Does applying to two different kinds of jobs at one company lower your chances of getting either one? 

Summary

Does applying to two different jobs at one company significantly lower your chances of getting each one? I am interested in two different areas (and then they outline both of them). Would it be a bad idea to apply to both of them at the same company? How does the process usually work with processing applications?

Without outlining the specific jobs, I'm going to answer the specific questions.

As to whether reduces your chances by applying to more than one position, well, it depends. I interviewed someone for the show not long ago who was a corporate HR recruiter. He commented that his firm's applicant tracking system was set up to recognize individuals who were, "frequent appliers." In his firm which was a medical facility in the mid-Atlantic states, his firm would get applications from people for multiple positions that they weren't qualified for. The system is set up to block them from applying because they are little more than a spammer to them.

"Yes," you can think, "they may hit on one of them." These people are not paying attention and don't really care about the impact on the person reading the resume; they just want to work for the company. What firms look for our someone who can fill individual job. You can see the disconnect there.

Thus, multiple submissions can have an adverse impact unless you're going to individual hiring managers. So, if you are applying through the applicant tracking system, you're starting to lower your value to them. After all, even if there are two different recruiters handling the two different jobs, the system is going to recognize that you've applied through two different types of position. Even if they look at the resume, there recognize that it's the same person applying for two different jobs, realize that you probably don't fit either of these roles and reject your resumes.

Or they may look at them and think to themselves, "Spammer!" Or they may just simply say, "Huh," and delete your resumes.

So, it can have an adverse impact, it can have a neutral impact, it can have a negative impact, at worst.

Let's review the scenarios:

"Huh?" (rejected).

"Let's consider him for this one, but delete the resumes for the other."

"Spammer!"

There is no situation where they are going to say to themselves, "Fabulous! We received the resume for two different jobs!"

And the probability is that two different recruiters are coordinating two different jobs so there is going to be internal friction so they will have to figure out who is going to be the primary interviewer and who will be the secondary. Remember, corporate recruiters are now being evaluated based upon outcomes, too. Thus, it's not simply you getting hired (which I know is all you really care about); for them, they have metrics they have to live up to and you will probably be wasting their time they could be better served elsewhere.

Continuing, how does the process work with applications? Would I be talking to the same recruiter? I've addressed that already.

The fact that you are submitting your resume to two different positions, involving two separate groups, demonstrates that you're an amateur to them. As such, you are sending a signal to the employer that you don't really have a career yet and are trying to sort things out. After all, in their thinking, you can be interested and qualified in one area, not the other. The fact that you're  leaving it to the winds, to the ether to sort it out for you, sends messages to employers.

Even if the two jobs reflect an old paradigm and a new one, they say are themselves, "Ah! She's trying to make a career change. She's not good be happy doing this old work if we hire her for that." You see, it's not just as simple as whether it is going to one recruiter or two. It is the impact and that message that the recruiter or recruiters is left to interpret. Left to their own devices, recruiters pause, leave the window open and go on to something else. In their subconscious, they try to process the conflicting messages that you are sending by applying for two very different jobs.

Usually, when they pause, they hesitate for lengthy periods of time. When that happens, they come back and re-review the resume and don't act on it then. Eventually, they reject the resume.

Can it turn out differently? Absolutely! How will it probably turn out? Not so good for you. You are far better off zeroing in on one thing you want that you are qualified for and going for that.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

What Is The Best Day & Time to Email a Resume And Cover Letter to a Recruiter | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/13/what-is-the-best-day-time-to-email-a-resume-and-cover-letter-to-a-recruiter

EP 1285 My answer probably isn’t what you expect.

Summary

When is the best time and day to email a resume and cover letter to a recruiter?

That is the question for today. Let me start off by asking, why are you sending it to recruiter? Why not just try to find the hiring manager?

The hiring managers the actual decision-maker who's going to make the choice about whether or not you're actually going to be interviewed. Some recruiters may do that so why not go directly to the hiring manager? That's point number 1.

Point number 2 is, "But I can't find the hiring manager!"

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com has some tips about how to do that.

3rd. If you insist upon sending it to the recruiter, I saw one opinion it's a Tuesday through Thursday night from 9 PM or later. Why? The opinion is because it is waiting in the inbox for the recruiter to say 1st thing in the morning when he or she walks in.

Maybe a sense of what happens from a recruiters perspective. This is a corporate recruiter for more well-known firm who spoke at an organization. They are well known, well regarded, well-liked, and I don't know what her day is like, but that 9 o'clock, email is pretty well buried in my inbox when I walked in the door.

I'm getting stuff sent to me all night long from people who are trying to get my attention. If there is someone sending it to me at 9 PM, is also summing sending it to me at 1 o'clock in the morning. At 2 o'clock in the morning. At 3 AM. At 4 AM. At 3:05 AM. At 3:07 AM. On and on and on until the next morning.

It is my suggestion. Instead of playing that game of being the 1st 1 in the inbox to be noticed, consider conceding that time because, in my case, let's say there are 50 messages I walk into on a Tuesday morning (it's actually more than that) or a Wednesday morning, I will start off with the top few of them and the one sent to me at 6 PM the night before… I won't see them right away. I'm not starting with the oldest 1 1st. I'm starting with the more recent 1 1st… I'm kind of working my way down.

Then new stuff comes in and I'm responding to, and then I'm going to the older stuff. Newer than older.

My thought is that instead of sending for a 9 AM arrival where we are playing that game, send it for a 10:30 AM or 11 AM arrival. Monday you could go later morning than that, like 11:30 AM, noon, or 12:30 PM arrival.

Or Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday… Do it then. Don't do it for 9 AM. Do it for later in the morning where people have a chance to get caught up on some things. Mondays may be hard because they do on boarding, or they may have 3 days worth of emails (Friday after close of business, Saturday, Sunday or early Monday morning). You don't want to be competing with all those.

My thought is late mornings are ideal. It could even be late morning early afternoon on Monday. Tuesday Wednesday Thursday – – mid-to-late morning. Friday, do not send it in the afternoon. You are better using Outlook to delay the send of your resume and cover letter. By using delay/send, your preventing yourself from being caught up in the weekend emails but so that it arrives on the following Monday.

I get calls from people on Friday at 5:30 PM as though I'm waiting around to have a detailed conversation with someone Friday at 5:30 PM or 6:30 PM or 7:30 PM! It's bizarre! Are you sitting around waiting for recruiters to call you? Why do you think I'm so excited to be talking to you at those times?

Again, think of what it's like to be the recipient of your contact. Pick times that are relevant (which is what I've been suggesting here) and work within those frameworks.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Should I Apply for a Job At Half My Previous Salary? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/30/should-i-apply-for-a-job-at-half-my-previous-salary-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1271 Should I apply for a job at half the salary I once earned given I’m almost 60 and the options are slim?

Summary

Here's a question I received through quora.   I want to read the full question..

"Should apply for job at half the salary I once earned, given that I'm almost 60 and the options are slim?"

We don't know what this person does professionally;  we just know that they don't have choices.

So I get a look at a few scenarios.  You make $150,000 per year And want to look at a job paying $75,000 per year.  You are a $200,000 a year person  looking at a job paying $100,000 per year.  You are a $100,000 a year person looking at a job paying  50.

Here's the reality to it.  In most of these scenarios, you're not qualified to do the job  at a lower level, nor firm is going to hire you because they are not going to trust whether or not  you are going to jump ship when the market for what you do gets better.

I want to help you and, I have said this in videos that I've done, if you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume.  If you are getting interviews and not invited back, the problem is you don't interview as well as you think you do.  If you are being invited back for 2nd interviews but not getting job offers, you don't have good relationship skills with senior professionals.  Lastly,  if the situation  is that you are getting offers are coming in  lower than what you wanted, you may not be the 1st choice and they are basically saying, "Screw it.  Let's give him a shot and see if he will come in at a lesser price."

It's easy to blame the market Again, we don't know what you do..  Perhaps, you don't have skills that are particularly viable. After all, you may be a $50,000 a year person looking at jobs paying $25,000 per year. That's possible, for example, in social work where you may be a manager at an agency, and are now looking at positions as a caseworker.  You can do that.  You will probably need some refresher because you have been doing oversight for people and haven't been sitting opposite someone Doing case management for a long time.

Recognize that, as a more experienced person, you may no longer have the qualifications  to do the staff level position and you are going to need to be proactive to get the skills up to speed in order to be effective.

So, again, you can do it, but it is not likely to work.

You also say that the opportunities are relatively slim..  I am going to work with another assumption here.

You are passively bringing age discrimination into the conversation and you are using that as the excuse for why you are not getting hired.   It is certainly possible, but, more than likely,, you are not selling yourself real well when you are meeting with the younger manager, either male or female. You are looking across the desk and thinking, "Shit!  They are 30 years old.  They are not going to be interested in me." That's going on in your subconscious and, unfortunately, that's a mistake. There are ways to deal with that issue  but you are not going  into the interview "all in."

That's what you need to be.  All in in these situations.

Hear me out.  Try it.   Go all in.  Push yourself. Don't cop to the belief that it's 60 you're not employable.  I speak from the perspective of  being older than you are and  have worked in search for more than 40 years.  People  would hire me in a heartbeat because they know how talented and successful I am. On an interview, you have to make sure they learn how talented you are.

So get out there  and raise some cane on your interviews and don't use excuses.

Now there was one other phrase that you used – – "options are slim."

You may only be looking on job boards.   When you only look at job boards, there are a finite number of jobs.  You are not out there doing network.  You are staring at the same things coming up over and over again  and saying to yourself, "the options are slim."

In fact, job boards fill, depending upon the statistics you look at, 3 to 6% of all positions..  Recruiters fill another 20 to 25%..  Between the 2, they fill between 30 and 32% of all positions.  The rest are filled by networking.   Of those, approximately 70%, The statistics also say 70% of the 70%  are filled as a result of introductions to people That you didn't know at the beginning of the job search.

You have to go network. You need to talk to people and be referred  to absolute strangers and practice doing informational interviews and practice networking. Get out there.  No excuses.  Don't surrendering to this,, "oh woe is me,," attitude that is implicit in your question. Get hungry again.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Finding Who to Contact at a Company | JobSearchTV.com


Trying to contact a decision maker at a company you’re targeting or that you saw advertise about a job?

Summary

Today, I'm going to talk with you about how to actually contact the firm that you're targeting to work for now. Let me give you a scenario; you see an ad online .You see something in the newspaper, trade publication, a firm is hiring. You want to get an entry point there.
Another scenario is the firm that you'd like to work for or you've heard great things about them, this is a firm you'd like to be employed by. How do you enter? How do you get your resume in front of the right person. Now, the the classic dumb way to do it is go online, search for listings, apply using their applicant tracking system. Frankly, you know people used to complain about "the black hole" when you were mailing resumes or emailing resumes. Applicant tracking systems are just as bad, if not worse, because they use computerized algorithms to reject you.
So,the basic way I'm going to start off with is, you know, if you know a firm is hiring or you've targeting this organization, what you want to do is go to LinkedIn, see if there's someone within your network that happens to work there, you contact that individual, you tell them I saw something listed there. Could you point me to the right individual who I should contact who I could approach about this role?" Or "would you be kind enough to refer me for this job? This is what my background is. Would you be kind enough to forward a resume?"
Now, why would they do this, especially since LinkedIn has changed over the years of instead of being just purely close relationships to it's very weak relationships, people who have a vague reason for being connected with one another, rather than just simply close friends. Why should someone do that? Why should someone refer you? Very simply you know, if they refer you and you are hired, there's an employee referral bonus available often get. There's a financial incentive for them to do that.
Now, they also don't want to refer bad referrals, you know. If you, in no way, shape or form, fit the requirement, if your resume does nothing to highlight that you're a fit,don't waste their time. You know, you're wasting everyone's time. You know, no one's going to do that. Would you?
But see if you can contact someone that you're connected with on LinkedIn. Just don't only look for first level connections. Maybe someone within a group that you're a member of. Not a member of groups? Join the largest groups for what you do on LinkedIn because that helps you extend your network for inMails without it costing anything. So, join large groups on LinkedIn so you can connect with more people.
Now, if you still not connected to the right person, here's another avenue that you can explore. It may cost you a few cents. But if this is really what you want to do another site that you can go to is is currently called Jigsaw.com. I suspect in the next year or so, It's going to be changed to data.com. jigsaw was acquired by Salesforce. It's being rebranded as data.com right now. You can get on either way, but I think jigsaw is the current entry point. Data is about to be the entry point.
Now ,what this site does is it tells you the names of people at organizations who you can contact who or in particular roles. So, if you want to hire, for example, contact the Chief Information Officer at a firm, the Chief Marketing Officer., It's going to be there. If you want to hire or contact people in HR it's going to be there.
They may list 27 people in hr and you're going to have to kind of piece your way through it. But it's a way that you can you can connect with the right individual
. Another way is sometimes public libraries have access to Hoover's. Hoover's is a pay service and Hoover's will allow you to do much the same thing as jigsaw or data .whereas jigsaw/ data is member propagated () that is, people who aretaking outare also putting in (), Hoover's doesn't do it. that way. They've searched the web and they're looking for information through a variety of sources to propagate their site.
Both work very well. Try different ones. Try either one. I should say to get an entry point to an organization and then, If you're contacting, for example, a chief technology officer at a firm,
"I understood you were trying to hire hire for someone in your organization is trying to hire for this role. Could you point me to the right individual? You know, I'm happy to contact HR but and I prefer to contact the line individual who's responsible for the job."
Why ?Because HR (let's) work with the talent management system,, for example () , it's a dumb system. It's supposedly intelligent, but it's actually dumb. You want to actually get to a decision maker. HR doesn't make decisions about whether to hire. They have the first line decision about whether to reject. They can't guarantee the hire. Only the hiring manager can. HR can influence for compensation. You want to perform well in front of them, but, ultimately, it's a hiring manager that's responsible for whether or not you chosen.
So get to the hiring manager. Let them know that you're interested in a particular role. You want to have a chance to connect with them. Is this a good time? I'm telling you to call them. Don't you send a resume. If you're asked us to send a resume, if you are not getting calls back, then, instead of just simply calling, then, send the resume and indicate that you'll be back in touch with them.
"Could they get back in touch with you give you a sense of when they might be available to speak."

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon

Is One Click Apply a Good Thing For You To Use? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/26/is-one-click-apply-a-good-thing-for-you-to-use-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1267 Is one click apply good for you to use?

Summary

More and more sites use the feature of one-click apply to make it easy for you to apply for a position.… But should you actually use it? Is one click apply actually a useful tool for you as the job hunter? Let me explain what happens with one click apply and the two ways that is offered.

First, when you are on a job board like Indeed, and they say, "you've uploaded a resume to us and we will forward it on to the employer." Here's what happens behind the scenes. They are sending that same generic resumes to every job. It's like the broken watch that is right twice a day; that resume may or may not actually demonstrate the fit for the job and you haven't done anything to customize your resume. That can be a problem for you, costing you an opportunity.

In addition, when they send a resume, they don't have your address there. They have city, state but no ZIP Code. You may think, "What is the big problem?" The issue is they submit the resume for you and even uploaded to a database or applicant tracking system that is on the recipient's side. Without the ZIP Code, no one will ever find you again when other positions open up at that firm.

"Huh?"

No one will ever find you. Let me give you a perspective.

Let's say, you apply to a position of mine and the resume doesn't have your ZIP Code. How my going to find you in my system?

"You search by skills."

No. I search by skills and location. Without a ZIP Code, I don't have your location.

"Why can't you look me up by city?"

Databases don't work that way. They are set up to search by a certain radius of a particular location as defined by ZIP Code. The result is you are lost forever and become invisible to me.

"I have submitted to a local recruiter!"

They do the same thing. I will use New York as an example. I have a job in Manhattan and if I search for people within a 50 mile radius of Manhattan, the databases all search by ZIP Code. How will I find you?

"They will search everything."

But they won't do that. They search by ZIP Code. So, you are lost to them. They won't find you.

Another way sites do it is by taking your LinkedIn profile and submitting it for the job. Take a look at your LinkedIn profile. That's thinner than your resume. It certainly isn't customized to the job. The result is that you are basically dumping spam on people.

For most job hunters, one click apply is a convenience that isn't effective. It isn't something that will get you more interviews; it will allow you to submit more resumes and give you the feeling like you're doing "stuff," but it's not going to give you the results that you want.

So I want to discourage you from using one click apply and, instead, take note of the job, submit a customized resume for it and go from there. It will be far more effective.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.