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Tough Interview Questions: Tell Me About a Time You Were Treated Unfairly | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/09/23/tough-interview-questions-tell-me-about-a-time-you-were-treated-unfairly

This is a great trap question that employers use and I tell you how to avoid falling into the trap and what they are really looking for.

Summary

This question is going to sound like 1 of those questions a makes you scratch your head and wonder why they are asking it. "Tell me about a time you were treated unfairly. Or unjustly." I want to stick with "unfairly," because it is a simpler way of expressing it that most people can relate to.

What is an employer really looking for here? The fact of the matter is if they're using this question well, they are going to goad you into presenting yourself as being persecuted as being treated badly, and encouraging you to really give them a juicy description of what happened and how bad it was, and how horrible. They will say things like, "That's awful.." Or, "Really," or, "Wow!" And in doing so, they are going to instigate you into saying more.

That's the sucker move.

What they are really looking for is how you took ownership of the situation. Again, this is a question about ownership. This isn't about vomiting some deep-seated resentment of your life. Follow that? It isn't about vomiting deep-seated resentment, it is about how you took ownership of the situation.

Ownership can take a variety of different forms. For example, I remember one instance in my case where I set for the panel was evaluated and I thought I was treated very badly. They changed the rules of the game on but didn't tell me so I way with one expectation; they went with a completely different one that they didn't tell me about, at the end, I felt very frustrated and angry and hurt because I felt betrayed.

If I left the story at that point, I should be rejected because what they are looking for is someone who takes ownership. However, if I continue the story by saying, "Afterwards, there were a number of people who had the same experience. We got together and created a panel they made recommendations for a new process that panels could use to evaluate candidates.. From that, we developed a model that is still used to this day." You follow what I'm doing here?

It isn't the story, but what you did with the story that's important to the employer. Or what you learned from the experience at the most important part 2 what you relate.

To summarize, if you stick the feeling of persecution or being treated unfairly, you lose. If you convert the story into one that talks about how you use this experience to change process or change an organization or change the world, or do something, or what you learned from this experience that you apply even to this day, then you win.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Tough Interview Questions: Tell Me About a Time You Were Treated Unfairly | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

This is a great trap question that employers use and I tell you how to avoid falling into the trap and what they are really looking for.

Summary

This question is going to sound like 1 of those questions a makes you scratch your head and wonder why they are asking it. "Tell me about a time you were treated unfairly. Or unjustly." I want to stick with "unfairly," because it is a simpler way of expressing it that most people can relate to.

What is an employer really looking for here? The fact of the matter is if they're using this question well, they are going to goad you into presenting yourself as being persecuted as being treated badly, and encouraging you to really give them a juicy description of what happened and how bad it was, and how horrible. They will say things like, "That's awful.." Or, "Really," or, "Wow!" And in doing so, they are going to instigate you into saying more.

That's the sucker move.

What they are really looking for is how you took ownership of the situation. Again, this is a question about ownership. This isn't about vomiting some deep-seated resentment of your life. Follow that? It isn't about vomiting deep-seated resentment, it is about how you took ownership of the situation.

Ownership can take a variety of different forms. For example, I remember one instance in my case where I set for the panel was evaluated and I thought I was treated very badly. They changed the rules of the game on but didn't tell me so I way with one expectation; they went with a completely different one that they didn't tell me about, at the end, I felt very frustrated and angry and hurt because I felt betrayed.

If I left the story at that point, I should be rejected because what they are looking for is someone who takes ownership. However, if I continue the story by saying, "Afterwards, there were a number of people who had the same experience. We got together and created a panel they made recommendations for a new process that panels could use to evaluate candidates.. From that, we developed a model that is still used to this day." You follow what I'm doing here?

It isn't the story, but what you did with the story that's important to the employer. Or what you learned from the experience at the most important part 2 what you relate.

To summarize, if you stick the feeling of persecution or being treated unfairly, you lose. If you convert the story into one that talks about how you use this experience to change process or change an organization or change the world, or do something, or what you learned from this experience that you apply even to this day, then you win.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Tell Me About a Mistake You Made & What You Learned From It (for Recent Grads)

EP 1029 Here, the answer is tailored for the recent graduate.

Summary

This is one of those classic interview questions that people are asked.

"Tell me about the mistake you made and what you learn, from it."
ir
Now the problem with this for recent grads is the just aren't a lot of choices, at least ones that you think of sound good to an interviewer.
.
So I wanted to give you a suggestion for answering this question . . . .and it's an easy one. It may not be truthful but work with me here!

"When I was in school or in high school and I really wanted to get into a particular school, I also wanted to have a lot of friends. So I made choices that weren't ideal for me to get those grades and boy did it hurt when I didn't get into (pick the name of the school) that would have really been happy with.

I really want to get you to give them the idea here that you learn from your mistakes and that you are not a whiner. It's not just enough to talk about the mistake that you made; it's important to talk about what you learned from it because that's the thing that they are fishing for are. Are you someone who's just a whiner and complainer or are you someone who learns from the experiences and takes the lessons in.

So I really wanted to get into the University of Chicago, Penn, Harvard, Stanford whatever and I really wanted to do that but in I was that stage in life is really in that stage of life where I want to have friends.

What I learned from that is to put my best effort in whatever I was doing.

I had this fantasy that I could can get in there without putting in the work and boy was I wrong. I really learned that if I want to get something I can go half effort into it. I have got to go at 100% effort. I have really got to give it my all in order to givemyself the best chance. Itis certainly possible that I might not havegotten to the schools but I will never know because I never really tried hard enough to in.

I didn't understand that I could lose. What I've learned is always, without a doubt, put my best effort into whatever I'm trying to do.

I have another video that talks about how to answer this question when you have more professional experience.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Do You Consider Yourself a Strategic Thinker? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/12/11/do-you-consider-yourself-a-strategic-thinker-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 953 This is a trap question for people who are managers, directors, VP or C suite professionals.

Summary

Today, I want to answer 1 of those tough interview questions that, to me, is a trap question that you need to be prepared for if you are asked it on an interview. The question is, "Do you consider yourself a strategic thinker?"

I'm sure most of you are scratching their heads and going, "Sure, I'm a strategic thinker." You are racing into the trap if you immediately answer that way.

What you want to be doing is answering from a textured perspective and give them a more complex answer. Again, this is a question is being asked a manager level and above , and depending upon where you are in the pecking order, you have a perspective of what is appropriate and your level.

Conceptually, the right answer would be, "Yes I am a strategic thinker but to be effective as a strategic thinker you have to think tactically. Like in the military, it is not enough to have an effective strategy; you have to be able to implement it. Unless you able to implement it, all you have are some great ideas

And some great intentions but nothing changes.

To be an effective strategic thinker, to work with a strategy that helps an organization, you have to look at the implementation of it, what the rough edges might be, where it runs up against resistance forces."

Do you weren't coming from here? Always try to give them a textured answer that basically translates into, "Yes, I'm a strategic thinker but to be that way, you have to think tactically. It's like in the military. Military leaders, if you've ever spoken to them, our brilliant people. Incredibly smart. They can think in conceptual terms and technical terms for the battlefield."

It's really the same thing for you. You have to be able to talk about both the big picture and tactics.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

What Were/Are Your Boss’ Strengths and Weaknesses? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

 

EP 858 WOW! A chance to criticize your boss. Should you take it?

Summary

This is 1 of those great questions that is designed to see if they can flush out that you are an imbecile! I would suggest a very textured answer. The question is, "What are (or were) your boss' strengths and weaknesses?"

Some people make the mistake of going off on this enormous tirade about their boss. They say nothing positive about them; they just go off half cocked, criticizing and abusing them for some perceived mistake. Welcome folks. Your boss is a human being and doesn't do everything right.

Here's the way I would suggest answering this question. It isn't hard but follow this for 2nd. "My boss' strengths Were that he or she interfaced very well with senior management and shield us a lot of the political stuff that went on. Some of the palace intrigue they can sometimes occur in decisioning. Then, they would come back to us with what the solutions were or what the mandates were so that, in this way, we were able to perform her job particularly well." Got that? I think that is a nice little answer.

Here are the weaknesses. "Our boss did a great job of shielding us from…"And feed the same thing back to them. When they look at you puzzled and smiling, you can say, "There are 2 sides to this coin. What he or she could have done a little bit better is make us aware of some of the things that were going on so that we could learn and, in this way, be prepared to step into his or her shoes so that when was our time to step up, maybe he would change jobs, maybe she will the getting a promotion 1 of us wound up with wind up stepping into this role, we will be prepared for a little bit better had here she just opened up a little bit about what was going on and thus the reasons behind what the decisions were. what he or she attempted to communicate with their peers or managers, what their preferences were and how decisions were made from up high. That would have been helpful to us.Just shielding us was a good 1st thing. What they could've done a little bit better was teachers what went into the decisions so that we would be prepared."

I think that's a nice way to answer it. It's the same answer flipped the back and expanded upon to give texture. And to me, texture to an answer is the big part of answering tough interview questions like this.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

 

The “Two Coins in a Box” Brainteaser | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/23/the-two-coins-in-a-box-brainteaser-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 844 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers an answer to this clever little brainteaser.

Summary

I have another 1 of those fun interview questions that is designed to trip you up.

A box contains 2 coins. One is a double-headed quarter and the other is an ordinary quarter, heads on one side and tails on the other. You drove 1 of the coins from the box and it is heads. What is the probability that the other side shows heads, also?

The 1st time I thought of an answer, my instinct was to think that there was a 50% probability. I paused and paid more attention to the question. I then realized that that couldn't be possible. Here is why.

When the coin is drawn there are 4 possibilities. There is heads and heads; that is one possibility. And that choice appears twice because there are 2 possibilities with a double headed coin. There is heads and tails and tails and heads.. They are telling you right away that you are seeing heads so that 4th option isn't there (tails and heads).

There are 3 possible alternatives. Both of them involving double heads 1 is a heads and a tail. So the correct answer is that there is a two thirds probability that the other side is also going to be a heads. That's because the 4th 1 was eliminated because you drew heads right away. Right away

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at [email protected]
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to [email protected]

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are You Interviewing? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/21/are-you-interviewing

EP 842  This is a variation on the question of, “Where have you been on interviews?”  Here. I explain what the intention is behind the question.

Summary

This is 1 of those questions is a variation on another one that I have addressed previously. This is the question of, "Are you interviewing?" It's a variation on the, "Where have you been interviewing," question. I want to speak to this 1 because really depends on who you're talking to as to what the intention of the question is.

Let me start off with third-party recruiters. With a contingency recruiting firm, you'll be asked this question for several reasons.
1. If you have been interviewing, they may turn around and say, "Where have you been on interviews so far?" They may be trying to find out have you been to the client, job leads of other organizations that are trying to hire so that you release that information to them and then they start reaching out to those firms to see if they can wind up being positions to work on and earn money from.
2. Another thing there trying to do is to see how far along you are in the process. So if you tell them that you have met with 14 firms, had 3 finals and you are close to 2 offers, they're probably going to hit the delete key on your resume when they are finished talking with you. That's because they will see any point in doing anything.

So one, shall we say, slimy approach to asking the question and the rest are pretty innocuous.

When an employer asks, they are obviously not good be contacting firms for job leads. What they are trying to do is (1) find out if you are aggressive job hunter. Companies have a bias against aggressive job. Their belief is that people who are actively looking for work are less attractive than those who, shall we say, are recruited. If they have contacted you and are asking this question, you might simply say, "I am not aggressively looking for work. But when you approach me, this is an interesting opportunity. Frankly, since the time you initially contacted me, 2 other firms have approached me as well" that you can talk about where you are with those firms.

Part of the reason that employer asks the question is to see how much time they might have before you have to make a choice, whether they can keep interviewing or, shall we say get off the pot and extended offer or move more quickly. You see, they like you (that's part of what the communication is), but they want to see if they can date others for a while before getting married.. You follow what I'm getting at here?

Recognize that their intent is to get a sense of how much time they have with you before they risk losing you. If you say that you have nothing else going on, they can sit back and relax a little bit, knowing that they can interview for a while. Let us know what's going on with you.,

"If anything changes, give us a call. We want to know. "

Most of the time when that happens, they have already seen a bunch of other people and never come back and make the offer.

However, if you say, "Since the time he reached out to me, a couple of other firms have reached out to me as well. I have had some really good interviews and there are some interesting opportunities out there," that will get them motivated to take more action.

Now, if you apply for job and submit a resume, this won't always work obviously, because you have indicated that you are an active job hunter. Thus, all, they are trying to do is see where you are in your process. If they are on a 1st interview and you are on a fifth interview somewhere, there are 1 of 2 ways that they might respond:
(1) accelerate the process
(2) hit the delete key because they know they cannot move fast enough.

I have found over the years that many firms where I mentioned to them that I had found this individual that really fits your role very well, but they are only 3rd or 4th interview and there are some folks who are interested, they never really move. So, caveat emptor. Recognize the impact of what you say and what the firm's motivation is.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

If you had your life to do over

Tough Interview Questions: If You Had Your Life to Do Over . . . | TheBigGameHunterTV


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses how to answer this very seductive question.

Summary

Here's 1 of those fun tough interview questions. This 1 actually is tough and involves a degree of theater on your part. Let me just read the question.

If you had your life to live over again, what one thing would you have to change?

What they're trying to do is test for emotional intelligence. If your manager, if your director, if you're in the C suite and someone is asking you this question, what they're trying to do is see if you can reflect on the past. They are trying to see how they can connect with you.

Maybe by now know that stories are so critical to how someone presents themselves to an interview and other professional situations. This is the story opportunity. You can start off by answering the question, "Whew! That brings me back." Then, in going back in time, you break eye contact and start looking down for a moment. Instead of looking at the person. In neurolinguistic programming people associate looking down with feeling. You want to demonstrate that you are feeling "stuff" at that moment.

Then you want to talk about a "miss" that you had. You don't want to be talking about an affair that you had... No no no! No affair stories. You want to stick with a professional context. Try to stick with something where you just missed. Think about this question in advance because you want to tell something that basically says, "I really try to plan. I really try to be proactive. I'm also quick on my feet, but I like to plan in advance. Every once in a while I have been in situations that I just couldn't anticipate and I miss. So, there was this time when…" The you tell a story about a time where you missed. You missed anticipating a detail and what the impact was and what you learned from it.

Like I said, along the way you break eye contact. You come back and look them in the eye. Then as you get to another feeling you look down again.

In doing this you are demonstrating what they perceive as sincerity, emotional intelligence and honesty.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Have You Ever Done a Layoff? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/08/03/have-you-ever-done-a-layoff-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

EP 824 How did you do it? How did it feel?

Summary

This question comes out of, "The New York Times," an interview with Max Levchin who was a director with Yahoo, former CTO with PayPal, started Slide, help start Yelp and is now starting another firm.

He says he asks this question of senior professionals on his interviews. And, I think, it is a good question to be prepared for.

The question starts off by asking, "Have you ever done a layoff? What did you do? How did it feel?"

He isn't trying to find out whether you brought them into a conference room or not. He is looking for signs of emotional maturity or not. Especially for leadership, this is 1 of the key factors you want to demonstrate on an interview.

You start off your answer by "sinking" a little bit emotionally. "You know, I have done them. There is never an easy way to do it." You need to change your voice from sounding enthusiastic to serious, sad, and softer. You continue on by saying, "I brought individuals into her room and told them personally. From there I tried to help him find another position in trying to be of further help to them. I reached out to a number of my contacts and, where possible, handed them a slip of paper and said, 'Call this person. They may have something for you.'" If that is not you, don't say it. After all, the law I can get exposed.

You can continue on by saying, "What I did afterwards was really hard. As they were packing up, as they were saying their goodbyes, I help them. I help them from a place, not from trying to get them the heck out of here fast, but to talk with them one to one as a human being and be of assistance. There is no easy way to say goodbye to someone who has given their blood and guts to an organization, who has cared as much as some of these folks have and still do without being a human being and wanting to break down. So that's what I did. I hope I never have to do it again."

So, they are not looking for you to tell them that you brought a group of them into a conference room and announced, "Ladies and gentlemen, I have the…"Or anything like that. They are not looking to hear you talk about how you brought them into something like a union hall to announce mass layoffs. It is about what happened afterwards.

When you listen to the recording, I tried to emulate how I want you to demonstrate how you felt and how you would express it, how difficult it was for me just to say it and I had not experienced it like you might have (I have laid people off and, emotionally, tried to go back to that space and remember how it felt.).

Try to connect with that time that you did it and how hard it was, Continue on by talking about how you help them pack, talked to them individually and, where appropriate gave phone numbers, names and email addresses of people that they can reach out to you from your network … That will demonstrate that you have compassion for your employees, as well as care, and then you will win that interview question.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected]
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

How Would You Deal With a Problem Employee? | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 964 I answer this questions simply and to the point.

Summary

This is 1 of those tough interview questions and it tends to be asked on final interviews, rather than along the way. If it is asked along the way, you're prepared! That's great! This question is, "How do you deal with the problem employee?"

If it is asked by the executive running the function that you are interviewing for, let's say are asked by someone in the C suite, your inspire media boss… It doesn't matter ... You need to divide up the issues in certain ways.

For example, You might start the responded, "It depends on what the issue is. For example, I assume this firm has a corporate policy that was to avoid creating a hostile work apartment. If is an example of women in the organization or people of minority groups in the organization being perpetrated against, you fire the person immediately. There is no excuse for in this day and age. You get rid of them right away. You make an example. However, if it is a performance-based issue like it is in most organizations, you've invested time and effort into the person. You counsel them. You talk with them how what they do is important to the organization and they have to put in best effort. If they're not able to understand what the assignment is, they need to ask for help.There are whole host of intermediate steps that you go through with someone, maybe more than once.

"However, there's a certain point where you have to say, 'Performance standards have to be met because it impacts everyone else.' If they feel that they have to cover for a mediocre employee, they start to presented in your best people start to think about leaving. I spend a lot of time coaching people and advising them and helping them perform up to standards. I let others know that this is part of my practice so they get the idea that I would be supportive of them. However, at the end of the day, if this person can't get up to speed, you fire them. You let people know that you tried a lot but I can't get them up to speed. I got rid of them. I'm in the process of interviewing the people.

"What this does, is (1) it sets a boundary. Because you talked about certain situations where it is completely intolerable that someone be kept on board.(2) you talk about coaching and counseling people to try to bring them up to standards because you know there are always times where people don't perform up to standards. You want to call them out in a good way. You want to help them. But, at the end of the day,, the firm is not there to be a club; it is there to make money.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

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