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Job Search Radio

Using an Ally When the Job Offer is Made | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/03/07/using-an-ally-when-the-job-offer-is-made/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses an effective strategy to implement when you receive your job offer.

Summary

Let's talk today about a simple job negotiation strategy that should be obvious to you but for a lot of people, it isn't. Let's get to work.

You are in the middle of a negotiation. Maybe HR has extended the offer. Maybe the hiring manager has. Let's work at the assumption that HR extended it.

HR tends to be fairly rigid and rules oriented. For example, one client of mine says, "We have the authority to increase salaries by a certain percentage as long as the person is within the same job level." Using that as an example, let's say you are an accountant. You are going to remain an accountant''s; do not being hired to be a controller. You're going to get you the same kind of accounting work for their organization as you did for your current one. What they will do is increase your salary by fixed percent.

Let's say that salary is too low for you. What do you do? HR doesn't necessarily have the clout to instantly up the offer. Your strategy is to get to an ally in this which is usually the hiring manager. You say to them, "I would really like to join. I think it's a great opportunity. I would love to work with you but HR extended a job offer to me that's just a little bit too low."

"What would be more acceptable," he or she will respond.

You will give them a number a little bit higher. They will say, "Let me see what I can do." Often, it is in the hiring manager's interest to increase the offer because, being practical about it, if they have to go back and interview all over again to find another 1st choice, they're wasting a lot of time,, thus, money in order to get someone to accept an offer and fill a job.

Here, you're looking for an ally from the hiring manager and they may say, "look, my hands are tied. I can't do it." At this point, you have a choice but you have learned something about the amount of clout. This individual has within the firm. After all, if they don't have the ability to increase at a job offer by a few thousand dollars,, that HR is so controlling of the budget that they can get you on board tells you something.

Again, I'm not going to tell you what to do here but you have learned something about the firm and you want to take that into account when you consider the job offer.

Now, let's do it the other way around. The hiring manager has lowballed the job offer. Let's now look at HR as the ally and say to them, "I really want to join. He or she seems like such a great manager. The work would be terrific. The offer is just a little bit low. Could you increase the offer (or have the offer increased)…" And then you offer the alternative salary. They may say yes or no. They may talk about their benefits and how good they are. All and all,, you are learning something, but the strategy here is to go for the ally
.
Go for the person who hasn't extended the offer to be an advocate for you for increasing the money.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews,

Job Search Radio
Job Search Radio

the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Job Search Radio

Asking for More Money | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/03/22/asking-for-more-money/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers eight simple to follow ways for you to ask for more money.

Summary

If you have watch my videos on salary negotiation, I try to cover a whole range of different options from the hardball to the softball. The show goes into the softer category which, frankly, I prefer for most of you because I don't think most of you can be hardball negotiators. In sales, it's different. There, I'm going to push you to be a tough negotiator because that is part of what they will be measuring you for. For most of you, however, softball, the gentle approach, not getting into arguments and confrontations, but presenting this as an "ask," and not a demand is far more effective.

When you get the offer, here is how you respond.

"WOW! That's terrific! Thank you so much. I'm so excited! But I must in all candor tell you that I love this firm the opportunity, but I have several other offers at the same salary level or in the same range." Then you shut up because the next thing that they're going to follow up with is, "So what do you plan on doing?"

"I need to sit with this a little bit. I'm hoping you could do a bit better to match my highest offer."

Understand that for most organizations, a 5 or $10,000 improvement is not going to break the bank. Even if they move by $2000. That's money in your pocket, not theirs, right? You don't want to get into arguments. You don't want to get into confrontations. You want to make it seem like you are agonizing a little bit.

"I have other offers in the same area. I was hoping you could match my highest offer." Understand, on your side, you need to be prepared to talk with them about what the number is and once they match and you have to be prepared to say, "Yes." There is no back and forth you anymore. It is done.

Also, understand that 5 or $10,000 is okay. $30,000, unless you are an executive level is not in the same ballpark. It is considered a wide difference in most organizations and their budget approach.

Recognize the difference here. Then, if they just increased by a little bit, you can respond by going, "I need to think about it. Can I get back to you later in the week?" When you get back to them, "this has been so hard. Is there any progress that you can make? Any improvement you can make?"

They may respond by saying, "No, that's it." Or, "that's really the best that we can do." Then you need to be prepared to give an answer.

No matter what, the approach is just to very simply give them the idea that you want to say yes, but they need to improve the offer. Then, be quiet. It's really that simple.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Job Search Radio
Job Search Radio

 

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice

Avoid Discussing Salary | No BS Hiring Advice


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it is not in your firm’s interest to show your hand before extending a job offer to someone.

Summary

Today, I want to offer you some no BS hiring advice in the realm of salary negotiation with candidates. Now, as an HR professional business owner, manager, at an organization that's involved with hiring, negotiations are always one of those tricky issues. You want to get someone for the least amount of money, but you also want to make them happy. So, you don't want to necessarily squeeze them. But you also don't want to overpay because, after all, you've got a budget to contend with.
Often, hiring managers, HR professionals, you know you are you going into a negotiation with a candidate or with someone like me, a recruiter who's representing a candidate (NOTE: I no longer do recruiting) and you get to a point in the negotiation where you reveal your hand about what you're willing to pay for someone. Probably, not a good idea.
Now, let me break it into two parts. First part is with a candidate. By telling them, "the most I'm willing to pay is such and such . . . " I'm not talking about we're screening someone ithe very beginning. I'm talking about at the pre-offer phase when you're really in the negotiation phase about salary . . . what you've done is basically tell them this is the max I'm willing to pay and, if you offer them five cents less, they are going to go, "What happened? You said you'd pay to such and such but you came in less." It impacts your ability to make them happy, make it attractive for them to join . . .What have you.
You're better off in those kind of situations offering a little bit less than what you're prepared to offer. So, in this way, if you come in higher than that, they get a little bit more enthusiastic. One of my clients has that built into their offer scenario where they talk about less. If they get the person for less, great! But, at the same time, was prepared to go a few dollars higher. They are able to show, time and again, that this is a tactic that, for them, saves some money and, if necessary, they are already slotted for more so there's no sweat.
The second part of this is in talking with recruiters like I was, I worked very closely with my clients. I don't play games. Some recruiters play games and, you know, the issue comes down to you're about to make an offer to someone. They will know how much are you going to offer? How much are you going to offer?
What they're trying to do is close the candidate for you and that sounds great . . . but if you tell them, "well, I can go up to (I will pick a number of random) $10 and you offer them $7.50, or, let me be clear about that, you're prepared to go to 10, but initially you want them to to offer them $8, so, if they say yes to $8, great!
If you need to, you'll go to $10, you tell that to a recruiter, they're not going to try to hard because they know they've got the 10 locked up and their fee is contingent upon how much you want to pay. And, I'll simply say that, especially for contingency recruiting firms, you know, it's better not to let them in on the numbers. The executive search which I try to do with many of my clients even though, often, I operate on a contingency basis, I'm working for my institutional customer.
Yes, I have to deliver a candidate to you but, you know, at the same time, I'm trying to be fair. I want to have that strong relationship with you and I don't play games. So, if you tell me you're prepared to go to $10 but you'd like me to offer $8, I'm going to do that. I'm going to work toward closing it. I've done that many many times. But ,you know, for most recruiters, you can hold back that extra information because, otherwise, there's no financial incentive for them, particularly in the contingency world.
So, better to hold back. Don't always be so revealing about the numbers you're prepared to pay. Make the recruiter work that much harder in order to close the sale. It saves your organization money.
Hey, it's not your effort that's going into this.It is the recruiter's and, if you burn out one, there's gonna be another one who's gonna replace them. And, frankly, if they're doing deals with you, they're going to keep working. So like I said, hold back on what the numbers are going to be so this way, you know, you're not just giving away extra money unnecessarily.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Job Search Radio

Your Best Position for Negotiating Salary | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/05/25/your-best-position-for-negotiating-salary/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses your most advantaged position for negotiating salary and how to play it.

Summary

You need to understand that with most organizations, they have salary guidelines that HR and hiring managers works with. It's not like they can take you from making $80,000 per year and give you $160,000. No matter how good you are, it just doesn't work that way.

With big companies, the basic strategy is always that you should get two offers. Not one but two. You have to time this out around the same time so that in this way, there's a certain amount of pressure on the employer. After all, from their standpoint, they have spent a lot of money interviewing and assessing candidates and deciding that you are the right one.

What you want to be doing is getting two firms in play. They're not going to bid aggressively against one another. It's not like they're going to say, "We're going to offer you $120,000."

"We are going to offer you one $130,000."

"When you change your mind and we're going to offer you $140,000!"

They will work to exceed something; don't talk with you about some of the benefits that they offer you. They may "goose" certain things but when push comes to shove in the big company market, normally, the lowball bidder tries to match the highball bidder. They can go back to the highball firm and say, "I have 2 offers at the same level. I prefer yours. Can you do a touch better?"

Watch my video called, "The Easiest Way to Negotiate A Higher Salary for Yourself." What that technique will do is get them to boost the offer little bit more so that you up the ante.

Now, at small companies, you get two offers, a big company and a small company, often the small company will do a little bit better, but they will never really match the big company. The big company just has deeper pockets. Maybe you'll get more benefits, more stock options, more things along those lines that will turn you on.

Recognize that a small company or a start up, sometimes their reaction is to go, "You know, if you are considering that another firm, you are not our kind of person." You have to be cautious with small firms when you are doing small company versus big company competing situations.

Two small companies. 2 startups. They get into (excuse my language) pissing wars with one another where they are beating down the other firms ideas, where they are talking with you about how good they are. You really need to bring them back to the money.

"I really appreciate more options here."

"Well, this is what we give out to people."

"I know. AND I would like more options here. I would like to get more money."

Do something that pushes them. Whoever comes in a little bit higher, that's the one you go to.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Should I Tell Them What I Earn? | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses whether to disclose your salary during an interview.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Salary Negotiation: Understanding Deal Dynamics in a Negotiation | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook:
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

When you go into a negotiation of any sort, whether as a job hunter, a hiring employer or within an organization, this is what goes on underneath the surface.

Summary

Here, I'm going to talk with you about negotiating. Now. The truth of the matter is this is a video that's going to be useful whether you're trying to negotiate your job offer as a job hunter or as anemployer because the reality is deal dynamics exist in any situation anytime you're negotiating. These are the variations that you have to deal with. So, for you as a job hunter, you may hear an employer ask the question, "So, where are you in your search? What else is going on for you?" You know what? They're trying to find out? It's really very simple. What they're trying to find out is do they have competition, whether you have leverage to play with them, whether there's a situation where you as a job hunter can really bargain with them because, hey, it doesn't matter. You've got three things going on. Thus when you don't have anything going on, they think they've got an advantage and, thus, the correct answer for the job hunter is always ro say, "I'm very close to two other things right now. I really like this one a lot. But, the reality is, as I said to someone yesterday, you may not have noticed this but there's no one with my name on. Forbes or Fortune list of wealthiest Americans so compensation's important to me. Thus, I want to encourage you to make your strongest offer because I'm confident other firms are about to do that, as well. Thus, what you've done is signal to them that, "hey, you know, they don't have the leverage here. They can't really push your buttons and say, 'you know, you want to keep looking for a job or do you want this job,"' especially in recessionary times where people don't really have choices. It's always very important that you indicate that you certainly will have choices, you're about to have choices and not give them that advantage because, ultimately, this is a question that signals who wants this more. And the one who wants it more is more willing to compromise. Do you want to compromise? And, for you as a hiring manager who's in a situation hearing this, often, if this is your first choice ,you're starting to look at your second choice as a possibility but stick with your first one and ride that out because you never know if they're bluffing or not. Is there a time constraint here? Like, does the employer have to bring on someone by end of year, by end of budget year, some other variable because they have to start a new project. You know, what's making it, right now, that they want to hire you and, thus, what alternatives do they have? Now, Sometimes an employer's going to try and regain leverage by saying, "Well, I have two other people I'm talking with on finals. What's your timeline?" Or, "I have two other people that I'm talking with," and they're signaling to you that, much like you've signaled to them, that you have choices. They're trying to say that they have choices, too. That's fine.
Job hunters often respond with that knot in the pit of the stomach that says, "I'm gonna lose this," and the idea is you always want to draw them in and, for you as the employer, you never want to give your leverage away because the reality is, ultimately, yes, you will have other choices. You've decided this is your first one but you want to get them at the right price, right?
Ultimately, what you're trying to do is to see who wants it more. What alternatives exist? What's the timeline for decision making? Can you move the needle forward right now? What's the real price point to complete the transaction?
And, you know, ultimately, when I think about most negotiations from a comp perspective, for job hunters or employers, one side really wants it more than the other and is willing to make fewer accommodations to the other side.
So, I want to remind you these are the deal dynamics and, once you're on board, there are other situations where you dealing with deal dynamics, as well. This subject is going to surface time and time again and you need to remind yourself, even in internal situations who wants this more? Who has the leverage here and how can you get what you want out of the situation without excessive compromise.
Notice, I used the phrase "excessive compromise," rather than compromise. Ideally you want to do without compromise.
I've got a lot more content about salary negotiation. If you go to www.JobSearchTV.com, that will take you to my YouTube channel, or you can visit my website, TheBigGameHunter.us

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Bad Negotiating. Bad Interviewing. | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/09/bad-negotiating-bad-interviewing-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1281 There should be a pact between people not to  try to do this and respect one another.

Summary

Let me check something out with you.

If you send me a resume and said you made $150,000 and I called you up and we had a detailed interview and I said to you, "Great! Your background looks terrific!  Our client can only pay $130,000. Isn't that great?"  You would be angry at me, right?  You be angry at me for wasting your time for expecting you. That you would do something that only a fool would do.  Take that big a haircut.  Yet, when people send their resume to me, and my advertising or my outrage or my communication with them, says, "This is the salary level. My client pays and we do the exact same thing in reverse, and you turn around and say, "Well, they should be paying $20,000 more," after I've spent 20 freaking minutes with them, didn't you read?  Did you see what I communicated?

Why do you waste my time?
This happens all the time. Job hunters think, and consultants. In particular, think that it is okay to go through this game but if you were reversed, "All, terrible, terrible."

So, I just want to encourage you, be mindful of other people's time.  Just because you've been treated badly in the past doesn't give you permission to treat others badly.

It's not like, "Okay, I got the bad experience.  Let me give it to someone else."  Then they can give it to someone.  No, it is not supposed to work that way.

We all have a responsibility to put into it in our work.  You don't get a pass because someone treated you badly. I don't get a pass because someone treated me badly. I still conduct myself as I commit myself to do.  In a forthright and honest way.  Communicate best information wherever possible and saying, "I don't know. Let me get back to you."

I will do that all the time.  However, I am not going to waste someone's time with the game like the one I started this podcast with.  Why do you?

I will simply say, that for many of you, you just don't know that it's the wrong thing to do.  As a matter of fact, for many of you (I have to say many because I just see how job hunters go about their business), you act as though the skills needed to find a job are not different than the ones needed to do a job.  Most of you are not capable of job hunting.  You find the job by accident.  You go through a lot of trial and error. You learn on the cuff.  You get lucky!  Someone hires you.  You think it's skill. But, all the way through, you are being shelled through a process that takes you through to this conclusion.

Visit JobSearchCoachingHQ.com.  This is a site where you are able to find information about how to search for work.  It is far better than what you will find in other places.  In addition, you can ask me questions about your search and I have no vested interest in which job you take.  It doesn't matter to me.  I'm there to help you to the best that you can on your search.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

How Do I Get a Recruiter to Respond to A Salary Negotiation? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/03/19/how-do-i-get-a-recruiter-to-respond-to-a-salary-negotiation

EP 1048 There has been no response to emails or instant messaging. I don’t want to bother my boss. Why aren’t they getting back to me?

Summary

I was asked, "How do I get a recruiter to respond to a salary negotiation?"

The person has been an intern and they have made an offer to them.  The recruiter for this firm hasn't been responding to emails or instant messaging and the intern is frustrated.  They want to find out how they can reach this person for negotiating.

Here are a few points:

As an intern who is converting to full-time staff, you are small fish on their plate.  I have other, more important fish to fry, too.  HR has a lot of things on their plate; they have hiring managers who are demanding service; they are interviewing; they are trying to fill positions; they are writing a heads… There are many things that HR is doing… You are not a big concern for them.
This HR person may be out of the office.  They may be traveling. They may be doing campus recruiting, hence why they may not be responding to you.
You are right not to trouble your boss.  This is not a major priority.  If the rule, they offered you a job  and you have already done parts of this job before.  They will probably be asking themselves, "What's the big deal?  You knew what the price point was we brought you want for this internship?"
They just don't care.  There's no point or concern that they have, because, after all, it's not like you're the only intern on the planet or qualified to do this job.  There are others. Their desire to negotiate is really small.
Let me summarize for you where you stand.

On the one side there is a rock. On the other side, there is a hard place.  You are somewhere between the two.

If your goal is to just make the connection and they are not respond, send an email to HR with the subject line, "Are you okay?"  The message may read something along the lines of, "I have emailed and I am do you and had not received a response.  I have a few questions about the job offer.  Would you give me a call, please?  I just want to make sure you are okay?  My experience of you is that you would normally get back to me but since I haven't heard, I just want to make sure that you are all right."

That will usually "guilt them" into surfacing.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

How Do Recruiters Handle Salary Negotiation? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/05/how-do-recruiters-handle-salary-negotiation-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1277 What do recruiters do or not do to advocate for you?

Summary

Let me speak to you today about how recruiters handle salary negotiation.

If you think recruiters go through mortal combat to advocate for you, and demand that employers pay you what you are asking for, you are kidding yourself. Let me walk through the typical process that recruiters go through. This is true of both retained a contingency search terms.

The employer contacts the search for; they contact an agency; I'm going to give both perspectives. They identify a role to be filled in the compensation that might be paid. They suggest a salary range and what bonuses might be like, what the benefits are… A whole host of things.

If the search firm has a relationship with this particular client, do you really think that this recruiter is going to start yelling and screaming at someone from his firm to get the money that you are asking for or are they more concerned about preserving the relationship with the firm that writes the check to them?

Yes, you can argue the case that without you. They are not going to get that check. But, at the end of the day, there is always another "you." Yes, there can always be another employer, but there is work to open up their relationship and create that relationship again so they tend to advocate for the people who write the check.

For Example
So, starting with the process of your resume being submitted, they have a sense of the range and I'm going to use simple numbers here. $60,000. $100,000. $250,000. Here are 3 different salaries

Let's say, for a $60,000 person, let's say the range is $55,000-$75,000. For the $100,000 person, is $95,000-$110,000. For the $250,000 person, is $240,000-$275,000.

They know these are the ranges for these positions. So they may indicate what your current salary is and the sense of what you are looking for, or may just tell them your current salary.

If you attempt to to simply tell them what you are looking for and not talk about what you are currently earning, often (like, always), a firm will turn around and ask, "What's he earning now?" "What is she earning?"

They do that because they refuse to give someone a prohibitively high raise.

Sales may be different. Sometimes, this will be called off. But for other types of positions, this is what happens. It is very very rare that a huge percentage increase will occur. Why? Because they are all operating under budget guidelines where HR is being reviewed and all their behaviors are being analyzed and when there is a percentage increase above a particular mean that is mandated by corporate HR, they turn around and ask, "What the hell was this all about?" It adversely affects them and how they are seen. So they operate within these guidelines basically say, "if a person makes $60,000, you offer them $66,000. That is a 10% raise. That is good enough."

Guidelines
"If a person makes $100,000, you offer them $105,000 or $110,000. That is a 5% or 10% raise. That is good enough."

"If a person is making $250,000, or for them to earn $260,000 or $265,000. We don't give 10% raises at that level. We give X percent increases."

See where I'm coming from?

That is the behavior that starts off. Thus, when the offer comes in, it might be low. Let me go back a step.

You are interviewing along the way and now, if you are out of work, you may be asked in the course of your interviews, "So, what's going on for you in your search? Are you close to anything?" If you say you don't have anything going on right now, you just hurt yourself. You have lost your leverage. They can issue an offer to you and say, "Take it or leave it. It's your choice. We have other people that can do what you do. We'll go find them and you are out of luck."

If you are working or are asked this question, you say, "I have some other options. Firms have expressed interest and I have final interviews with 3 other firms," then they understand is competitive and they may push things up. If they ask which firms, you say, "I would prefer to keep their name out of it so that everyone is bargaining with the same degree of knowledge."

"If I say to you, I'm interviewing at this firm or that firm or this firm, and I do the same thing with them, I think that is unfair. I want to see what your best offer is based upon your assessment of me, not based upon the competition." But, what you are doing is creating competition because they don't know what the target numbers.

If you tell them what the target number is it these other firms, that's probably what they're going to come in for anyway. No one tends to go much higher.

If there is a low offer that comes in, a search firm is going to advocate for you. They will spend some time talking with the client. The client will counteract that remark, generally with a comment that says, "Well, based upon a comparison with people who we already have working here with that amount of experience in this level of skill, we assess this person would be worth X number of dollars."

Most of the time when it really comes down to is that you didn't do a good enough job you're interviewing to demonstrate your value at the level that you are asking for. Thus, they are making a lukewarm offer based upon the opportunity that has been presented.

Your recruiter is not going to go into a death-match with the hiring firm in order to get you the position. They would rather go into that death-match with you, to manipulate you or persuade you to accept the offer at the level that is been offered.

Why is that? The job under is easier to change then the employer is and they know the relationship with the employer can continue afterwards, particularly if they got you to say yes to the low offer.

That's the scenario that normally comes up.

If you have a question about job hunting, email me at JobSearchRadio@gmail.com. I can’t answer every question . . . but you knew that!

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Negotiating for Introverts and Others: Negotiation Basics


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/03/negotiating-for-introverts-and-others-negotiation-basics

EP 1275 Here are the basics for entering a negotiation

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.