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Your First Day as a Manager at a New Company | No BS Management Advice


It’s your first day as a manager at a new job! Here are a few things you can do.

Summary

This one isn't necessarily, for a new manager. It's for a new manager walking into a new organization. You've inherited a team of people. These folks are wondering who it is that's going to be taken over and what it's like to be like for them, you have to understand that component to it as you walk into the new organization.
So, let's start off with you've spoken to your boss, in advance, and have an idea of what your calendar is going to be like with he or she on your first day and with anyone else. Perhaps you have access to your calendar remotely so that you have a sense of who's plugged themselves in.
So, with that conceded, and this is your first real work day, not the onboarding day, the benefits day, stuff along those lines, the first thing is you walk in, and the folks that you've met with during your interviews, say, "hi," to them, Connect with them. The folks that you haven't met with yet, connect with them, too. It makes a world of difference to folks because they have a chance to see you with a smile on your face, knowing full well that may be the last day they ever see a smile on your face.
As you talk with them, just ask some friendly questions. Who you are, what do you do. Do stuff to try and connect with them and build the initial rapport. Listen to what they say, ask one, maybe two follow up questions in total. That's really it. Because this is just the friendly first day.
In doing so, you want to have that positive attitude for an entire day. You want to have the twinkle in your eyes, a smile on your face, you want to be "the friendly person." You want to start talking with people about what your predecessor did well and what they could have done differently. Notice, I didn't say badly; what they could have done differently.
Listen to their complaints and what their issues are. Ask them about the firm and what the group does well, who the leaders are, and get a sense of that. Get friendly with people outside the group and find out and learn who, in the past, who on your inherited team, are the leaders and the best performers. It doesn't mean that you ignore the others. You may choose to get them to step up in the game, you may start pushing them out the door after you've had a chance to work with them for a while.
The last thing is, see if you can inject yourself into some tough situations if any materialize. It starts off with asking good questions that helps elicit information. Before you make a decision, especially on the first day when you know next to nothing, make sure you ask this very important question.
What do you think? What do you think is best in order to be done? Then, from there follow up with why is that?

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” and “No BS Job Search Advice.”

Are you interested in my coaching you? Connect with me on LinkedIn and, once we are connected, message me. If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Subscribe to the “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast.” 

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Connect with Me on LinkedIn 

For more No BS Coaching Advice, visit my website. www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Praise And Criticism | No BS Management Advice


Managers sometimes forget how to get the best out of their people.

Summary

I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter, the head coach for NoBSCoachingAdvice.com and JobSearchCoachingHQ. com.
Now I want to talk with those of you who are in management roles. I tend to do a No BS Management Advice video once a week, that's designed to help you be more effective as a manager and as a leader. This one is about praise and criticism, which I think a lot of managers forget to do.
I'm not going to say one or the other but, if you think about a lot of reviews that are given, folks invariably are surprised. They're blindsided by some of the things that are said to them. Why do you think that is? Folks, it's you, because you're not really talking to your people and you're not clear with them about what expectations are and how they're doing it.
I remember when I was in Toastmasters, they talked about "the sandwich approach--, you praise someone for the speech they gave, something good about what you saw, you make a suggestion for improvement, and then, from there, the third piece piece of the sandwich was, again, a compliment.
That may not work for you. But I think one thing that does work is, if every once in a while, you bring someone into your office or into your cube, sit him down, just go, "I'm just checking in with you. How do you think you're doing so far? What do you think you're doing well? Where do you think you could use some improvement?" Make them self critique.
If they say, "I don't know. Where do you think I could use some improvement?"
"Nah you go first," and you put it back to them to kind of sort through. You do this on a regular basis, not review time, because then they know that you're up to something, but you do it intermittently. You do it with your entire team of individuals, so that they're getting input from themselves and they're forced to consciously be aware.
Now, if they're way off base, as some people really are, what I want you to think of doing is really very simple. You know, you can say, "I see it a little bit differently. Can I offer a suggestion to you?" Then you bring nothing emotional into the equation. All you deal with arecthe facts of the behavior. Nothing requires an interpretation.
You just say, "I noticed a couple of weeks ago, you were working on something (by the way, never start off your first meeting with something that happened a few weeks ago; always deal with something much more current. Hit's more likely to be top of mind for them, even though you've been carrying around this baggage for a couple of weeks and haven't addressed it. We've got to start with something current. I'm just going to use this one as an example), I noticed a couple of weeks ago, I noticed something yesterday, where you were in a situation where it seemed like (this is where you're acknowledging it seemed like but may not have been) that you were struggling with something. I noticed that/I was wondering, how did you resolve that? Where'd you get some advice or help from?"
"Well I kind of toughed it out?"
"How much time did you spend 'toughing it out' when you could have gone to someone else? Is that your normal manner of doing things because you might have gotten it done and not hold up other people if you'd ask for some advice."
"Who could I have gone to?"
See you're entering into a conversation that's designed to help them improve. . . And that's what the goal is.
Now, you can also say, "I noticed that, at the meeting, you spoke up a lot more. I really liked that. I liked hearing your voice at the meeting because you really have a lot of valuable stuff to say." And notice, what you're doing is noticing something positive. I'm just giving you alternatives about how you can express things. It's factual.
Then, you know, at the end, in the example of the praise, "I like hearing your voice more," giving them encouragement to keep speaking, because they have something to say.
If one meeting you praise someone for doing something, the next week, don't criticize them for doing it, okay? Obviously, they get mixed messages. But the goal here is to give regular feedback and intermittent points. Catch them doing something right.
Ask them to self-critique on a regular basis because that self-critique is going to start building up a muscle of improvement for them. As they move into management roles, it's going to allow them to have a technique for how to work with their team.
I hope you found this helpful. I'm Jeff Altman. If you're interested in my coaching you, connect with me on LinkedIn at linkedin.com/in/thebiggamehunter. Once we're connected, message that you're interested in coaching. We'll set up a time for a free discovery call.
I hope you have a great day and take care

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” and “No BS Job Search Advice.”

No BS Management Advice
No BS Management Advice

Are you interested in my coaching you? Connect with me on LinkedIn and, once we are connected, message me. If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Subscribe to the “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast.”

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Connect with Me on LinkedIn

For more No BS Coaching Advice, visit my website. www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Before You Make a Decision | No BS Management Advice


People come to you to decide things because you’re their manager. Before you succumb to the internal pressure, do this first.

Summary

I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter, and welcome back for more No BS Management Advice. And today's piece of advice, I know I've committed this mistake myself, I'm sure you have, too, and it's the mistake of believing that you have to act in the moment, rather than slowing down just a little bit, listening to the different sides, constituencies and opinions before making a decision.
You see, everyone's lobbying for advantage, and everyone's withholding information and they're coming to you for a decision. You feel because you've got that title, you've got that role, just like I've had that title and that role, as though, you have to make a decision right now, this second, at this moment, without getting additional input, without even asking for advice from others before making that choice. I know I've made this mistake many, many times.
Often, I've been in situations where I've been tense, wired from my day, bombarded and now I'm being interrupted with a problem and my head is in a completely different space. All I want someone to do a shut up, go away, leave me alone. And the reality is, I make a mistake, a mistake that can prove costly to them, to me, to an organization as it has in the past.
I'm just going to encourage you slow down. Listen. Ask questions. Deliberate. If it's not the right time for you to listen, send someone away. Tell them, very simply,
I've got other things on my plate right now, book an appointment for tomorrow morning. Let's sit down and talk for 15 minutes about this situation. Once you have their input, ask them who else is affected? Go to that person, do the same thing. Get them on the calendar for 15 minutes, then advocate for their position. Ask them questions. Then make the decision. Very few decisions have to be made at that moment. And, if they do, you have to ask the question. "Why did you wait for the last second for a decision? What's that all about," and process them for that rather than for the subject.
You have to act according to your agenda, not someone else's, unless it's someone you report to. Most of the time, it's staffers who are demanding attention. They want to be right. They want to get on your good side and they want to win. That doesn't necessarily help you, does it?

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” and “No BS Job Search Advice.”

Are you interested in my coaching you? Connect with me on LinkedIn and, once we are connected, message me. If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Subscribe to the “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast.” 

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Connect with Me on LinkedIn 

For more No BS Coaching Advice, visit my website. www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Stupid Management Mistakes: Paying Attention to the Wrong People | No BS Management Advice


I observed something while I was traveling that was confirmed as a habit too many people engage in.

Summary

I just came back from a trip and stumbled into a scene that was a perfect example of stupid management. You know how some organizations like to huddle up the team to provide praise for people who've done some good things? I think that's a great idea.
The "however" is when all you do is focus on the managers in the group. What's the message that you're sending to the people? Now, that's what I saw when I walked into one business while I was away this past weekend. I happened to mention what I noticed to someone and they said, "Oh, yeah, that happened where I used to work. All the managers had these congratulatory comments for one another, and never paid attention to the staff. The staff would walk out of the meetings going, "That was a waste of time. Like, you know, none of us can ever get recognized."
Yes, it is important to recognize managers, but you have to pay attention to the people that you're managing; they matter. When you ignore them, they notice the pattern of being ignored. If that's what you think is best, you're off your gourd, You can't do that because folks get ticked off and they wind up losing interest in working for you because, after all, the only people that are getting recognition are the people with bigger checks and bigger titles than them. The message that they get is that they're unimportant.
You can't do this kind of stuff. Instead, find things that you notice from the week that indicate improvement, progress, something good that the employee, the staffer did because, as much as they may whimper about recognition, they hate to be ignored.
Always notice the good stuff, even if they give you pushback, because they will give you criticism. If you don't. I'm Jeff altman. I hope you found this helpful. If you did, and you're watching on YouTube, click the like button, subscribe to my channel on YouTube by clicking on a little icon in the lower corner. It's in the lower right by the way. And in doing that, you'll get notices whenever I release a new video or podcasts reserved you also want to mention I do one on one coaching to help people perform at a higher level. If that's something that would be of interest to you, contact me through LinkedIn and linkedin. com forward slash forward slash the big game hunter, connect with me there. And then from then message me that you're interested in coaching will set up time for free discovery call. Hope you have a great day and take care

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” and “No BS Job Search Advice.”

Are you interested in my coaching you? Connect with me on LinkedIn and, once we are connected, message me. If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Subscribe to the “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast.” 

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Connect with Me on LinkedIn 

For more No BS Coaching Advice, visit my website. www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Conflict

Avoiding Conflict | No BS Management Advice


I worked in some pretty despicable offices where management avoiding conflict. They got it anyway.

Summary

Conflict. Avoiding conflict.
If there's conflict in the office and you put your head in the sand and pretend nothing is going on, you're not managing conflict, you're avoiding it. Eventually, that conflict that you're avoiding is going to come down to one of three options.
One person admits that that that they were wrong. How often does that really happen? There's a blow up. More likely. A person quits, not right away, but when you need them, when you really need their services, they shrug their shoulders and go, "sorry, I'm out of here."
Why did they leave? Because, frankly, they don't believe that you're out to protect them, that you don't care about their safety, because this is a safety issue for many of them and the result winds up being they leave. They fall on their sword.
I worked in an office where I had people who stole from me. In one instance, it was stealing resumes; another one, and this is going back quite aways, and there was one computer in an office (that will give you an idea how long ago that was), there'd be people sitting in front of the computer, reading other people's emails. Seriously, do you believe that? They would read other people's emails and try and steal candidates and management didn't care. They did nothing.
The employee shrugged their shoulders and asked, "What was the problem?" Hmm.
So, I'll just simply say that when you have a situation where there's conflict, avoiding it is not the strategy to use. Tackling it is. Ameet with each individually, understand, ask questions, meet collectively, talk it through. If someone blows up, throw'em back in the room. There is more conversation.
Now, someone blows up, if that's the bully in the office, you stop the bullying right then and there because there are office bullies, right? If there's a gender difference, one side or the other may be, shall we say, more aggressive. You've got to calm it down. Bring it to level head and then play "Solomon dividing the baby" and make a decision.
Avoiding conflict is not going to avoid conflict for very long. People get mad. They get even. I will tell you my stories about getting even. I'll just simply say, I got even. You don't want that kind of culture to exist, right?

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” and “No BS Job Search Advice.”

Are you interested in my coaching you? Connect with me on LinkedIn and, once we are connected, message me. If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Subscribe to the “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast.”

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Connect with Me on LinkedIn

For more No BS Coaching Advice, visit my website. www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Professional Environments Win

Work Environments Win! | No BS Management Advice

Managers I have worked with will complain about how their teams offer nothing in the way of advice or input as to how to do things better. That’s because the environment wins!

Summary

This is a video that talks to you as a manager about the impact of the environment that you've created. Now, if you're happy with an environment, where you get no input from your people that's worth a damn, or worse, get no suggestions, no advice, no input from them whatsoever about how things could be done better or differently. . . . Your fault, because you've created an environment where they've gotten the message from one another, or from you that this isn't anything worth doing.
I want to be clear, one of the biggest places where it occurs is from one another amongst the staff. Ever hear the phrase "brown nose? Suck up? If those are behaviors or messages that people are getting, then you're never going to get an idea from anyone because they know ostracism starts to take place.
"Harvard Business Review" had an article eight, nine months ago on this subject. And, the truth of the matter is, I put the title of this as, "Environments Win." But it's really the messages that people get from their colleagues about what it's like to stick their head up as a poppy in the field, and what's going to happen to them that, often, is the big difference between success and failure in organizations.
You see, as a manager, the commonplace behavior that you're responsible for is repeatable process. You want people who will do their job and could repeat doing the job again and again. Thus, when there's someone who stands out in some way, often colleagues try to cut that person down to size. They backstab them, they criticize them, they tell stories about them, right? No one defends the person that they're really trying and that they really care.
I know, there was a search firm I was associated with, where, you know, I just didn't understand how they operated. I kept asking questions and the response I basically got was, that's basically how we've done it all. We've done pretty well. Good answer, but not good enough for me because I saw a way that could be done better.
Alternatively, people started, shall we say, shooting bullets at me, and taking shots at me behind my back meetings with managers and ownership. Eventually, I got the message that they didn't care. It didn't matter to them. Doing things the same way, it was good enough, the idea of doing something better wasn't. I learned to shut my mouth. The result was they missed boatloads of opportunities. I've always been out front with a lot of things. I'm not always right, quite obviously, but I'm right, far more than I'm wrong.
So, I'll just simply say if you're not getting advice, if you're not getting input from your people, that's because they've gotten the message in the environment and/or from you that they shouldn't do that. All you care about is repeating the performance and the process that's existed before and that's good enough.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Business meeting

What Are You The Best At? Do That! | No BS Management Advice


It amazes me to see managers and more senior leaders doing things they are not good at. Why?

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

No BS Management Advice
No BS Management Advice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” and “No BS Job Search Advice.”

Are you interested in my coaching you? Connect with me on LinkedIn and, once we are connected, message me. If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Subscribe to the “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast.” 

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Connect with Me on LinkedIn 

For more No BS Coaching Advice, visit my website. www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

It's hard to find good people

It’s Harder to Find Good People to Hire | No BS Management Advice


As I record this, the government is reporting that there are more jobs available than people looking for work. What can you do?

Summary

As I record this in 2019, it is getting harder to hire. Why? The statistics show that from . . . the government is reporting that there are more positions open than people looking for work.
Catch that one More positions are open than people looking for work. Obviously, there's not a one to one correlation. Like, I'm going to offer an extreme statement to make a point. If you're a coal miner looking for a job, the fact that there are 25 Software Developer jobs in your town available doesn't matter. You don't fit the requirements. So there's a disconnect between what firms need and what's available to them.
What can you as a manager start to do to fill your requirements?
One obvious place is talking to your HR organization, about training people who exist within the firm, who want to move up. They may not be a perfect fit right now but if they got trained for a few thousand dollars, or community college courses, or professional courses, they might be suitable with some guidance from you.
Now, remember, when you hire someone, it's not like they're a magic solution. That's because, again, the statistics on that are, within 18 months of a new hire, 48% of hiring managers have buyer's remorse and regret the fact that they hired this person from the outside and the expense of a bad hire becomes phenomenal. You know, the conservative number is to have a bad hire, the direct costs of the failure is 20%. But, when you bring in indirect costs, like interview time, and time spent worrying, and meeting and bringing in people from different departments to evaluate and assess, it's more like 35 or 40%. In other words, if someone's an $80,000, a year person (and I'm just going to do the 40% equivalent; I'm not a math major) but if they fail and leave, that's cost you $32,000. That's expensive.
If it's 30%, it's still $24,000. It's an expensive proposition to lose someone or have them fail.
So, what can you do? Again, I'm back to the idea of there are people internal to your organization, who, instead of you looking at a resume, you're able to look at a track record of success, and start interviewing people internally for roles where they'll be trained.
Now, I'm not talking about taking, you know, again, I want to do something extreme, someone who's never done your kind of work before, and training them in yours, unless it's something entry level that you're trying to fill. What I'm thinking about is something where you might bring on someone where you might train someone and transfer someone who has approximate experience, but not exact experience, and give them the opportunity to move up in the organization.
They will see this as a feather for them that the organization likes them. It solves a problem for you. You provide them with mentoring from you and a more senior person on staff who will like the idea that they're doing mentoring and coaching and helping with development, because it will look good in their reviews, right? It looks like a promotion for them. It looks like advancement for them. But organizations, for years, have outsourced training and development to the individual. And it's time to recapture that for the organization, to start looking at people, because others are looking at these people and giving them chances and other things.
I'm going to pick an example from technology. A Java developer who's lost to your organization has to be developed but they're now somewhere else satisfying someone else's problem. Wouldn't it be better if you promoted them, trained them, gave them new experiences, so you hold them, so that, you know, this person's a hard worker, that they're a good worker, that, again, another example that maybe they haven't missed a day of work in the last two and a half years. They care. They're a backbone of the organization, sort of a linchpin to your firm. Why would you put them at risk of being lost, when you only have to do is spend a few thousand dollars in training?
So, don't lose sight of that as a possibility. Look for other alternatives than just simply, "We need to hire someone from the outside, because they're not so available right now.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

No BS Management Advice
No BS Management Advice

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Leadership

Practice Leadership | No BS Management Advice


Labor shortages abound in many fields and you and your managers dilly dally (I love that phrase) through interviews and wonder why you are losing candidates

Summary

You know, when I work with managers, when I try to help them in their development, one of the things that they come to me for is improving their leadership, because they grow to understand that being a manager is different than being a leader. Let me explain.Managers are involved with setting goals for their group. They run tasks, they do stuff. Leaders start off with the bigger picture. They create a vision for a group or an organization. They affect change. They don't just simply copy other ideas, but they create new solutions for things. They're risk takers versus managers who manage risk and whole host of other things.Fundamentally, the thing that they do is inspire people to be come more of themselves, rather than motivate, which is "Do it because I say so." Or "Do it because you'll get the bonus." Yada, yada, yada. So, what I want you to practice doing is practicing being a leader.Now, you obviously have stuff that needs to be done. And if your people aren't getting it done, it begs two solutions. Number one is they're demanding micromanagement because they're not respecting you. All right.Number two is it begs the question of, maybe you're hiring isn't all that good because if you're finding that you're spending a lot of time directing people, forcing them to do something and they're just going , now they've got that sigh of frustration, these aren't people you want to have around. What they are is doom and gloom.Get them the heck out of there! Like I've said to folks, like there's a guy that I coach right now in his leadership who took over a group within an organization. And, you know, ultimately, he's inherited a bunch of complainers, and it's frustrating for him.I said, "You know, you can't change them. They've gotten into this habit of complaining, so you can give them one shot. But if you're going to find yourself changing people all the time and micromanaging them, it's gonna take a lot of energy out of you. So you're better off sitting down with them individually, one or two time, space it out. Don't make it seem like it's going to be a progression of eight people. Just, walk them in, every day, one person and simply talk with them about, "okay, this is what I'm looking for from you. This is what my expectations are. This is . . . right now, you're in the management mode to try and get them to do stuff like I'm giving you a task to do. And I don't want to watch you or listen to you complaining. It's a waste of my time. So if you don't want, you can leave I'm happy to support you in finding another job. But what I really want you to do is deliver because the next organization's going to demand you deliver anyway."And that changed things in his organization. It helped them realize they'd gotten into a habit of whining and complaining, and that he really wanted them to succeed. But when push came to shove, he couldn't tolerate all the BS that was coming with that.So, I want to encourage you, remember, this is a time in your career where you can practice being a leader, where you can inspire people, help them realize the spark within them so that it becomes a flame and starts burning brighter, so they can feel successful, they can feel like they're accomplishing things. At the same time, they need to get stuff done.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

No BS Management Advice
No BS Management Advice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” and “No BS Job Search Advice.”

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No BS Management Advice

The First Question You Need to Practice Asking | No BS Management Advice

https://youtu.be/ITeApsfE5Cg

Whether you are a new manager or an old hand, this is one of the first things you need to learn to ask so that you manage effectively.

Summary

I'm back with some more No BS Management Advice to help you, as a manager be more effective.
Now, most managers learn this lesson somewhere along the line, but often for the new manager, there's "a miss" in there. Because the way they got ahead, the way you got ahead was by having all the answers and doing everything well. Not perfectly, but well. So you'd get recognition, you'd get known, and you get noticed, right?
But when you get to be a manager, your scope and responsibilities start to increase and, suddenly, you notice holes in knowledge base that didn't exist before because your line of sight has to expand, the more senior you get.
As someone once offered to me in a different venue, when you're the worker bee, you're there looking at a certain level. But as you start to elevate and get to a higher and higher points, your line of sight just becomes so big until you become the chief executive officer of an organization where you need to have a visual on the biggest picture imaginable.
But here you are, as a manager, new manager, experienced manager, and your habit is to basically always think you have the answer. So, here's the first question I want you to practice asking people when they come to you for your decision or your advice. And the question is, "What do you think?" And then you shut up?
"I don't know, what do you think?"
Come on, I asked first? Let's sort it out together. What do you think here?" And then listen to them, because they really have most of the answers. You may have some details that will fill in some gaps to either prove or disprove their thinking and you're going to have an opportunity to learn something that you didn't necessarily know about the situation from the person who's directly in it.
So always start by asking, "What do you think," and then following up with, "why do you think that?" That's because you may just get the one sentence statement from them. And then you have to follow it up to make sure that they explain it to you, so that you understand what their perspective is. From there, obviously follow up with questions.
But the goal is always to start off by getting your staffers to answer the question, "What do you think?"

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Please click here to see my schedule to book a free discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

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