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NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Should I Apply for a Job At Half My Previous Salary? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/30/should-i-apply-for-a-job-at-half-my-previous-salary-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1271 Should I apply for a job at half the salary I once earned given I’m almost 60 and the options are slim?

Summary

Here's a question I received through quora.   I want to read the full question..

"Should apply for job at half the salary I once earned, given that I'm almost 60 and the options are slim?"

We don't know what this person does professionally;  we just know that they don't have choices.

So I get a look at a few scenarios.  You make $150,000 per year And want to look at a job paying $75,000 per year.  You are a $200,000 a year person  looking at a job paying $100,000 per year.  You are a $100,000 a year person looking at a job paying  50.

Here's the reality to it.  In most of these scenarios, you're not qualified to do the job  at a lower level, nor firm is going to hire you because they are not going to trust whether or not  you are going to jump ship when the market for what you do gets better.

I want to help you and, I have said this in videos that I've done, if you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume.  If you are getting interviews and not invited back, the problem is you don't interview as well as you think you do.  If you are being invited back for 2nd interviews but not getting job offers, you don't have good relationship skills with senior professionals.  Lastly,  if the situation  is that you are getting offers are coming in  lower than what you wanted, you may not be the 1st choice and they are basically saying, "Screw it.  Let's give him a shot and see if he will come in at a lesser price."

It's easy to blame the market Again, we don't know what you do..  Perhaps, you don't have skills that are particularly viable. After all, you may be a $50,000 a year person looking at jobs paying $25,000 per year. That's possible, for example, in social work where you may be a manager at an agency, and are now looking at positions as a caseworker.  You can do that.  You will probably need some refresher because you have been doing oversight for people and haven't been sitting opposite someone Doing case management for a long time.

Recognize that, as a more experienced person, you may no longer have the qualifications  to do the staff level position and you are going to need to be proactive to get the skills up to speed in order to be effective.

So, again, you can do it, but it is not likely to work.

You also say that the opportunities are relatively slim..  I am going to work with another assumption here.

You are passively bringing age discrimination into the conversation and you are using that as the excuse for why you are not getting hired.   It is certainly possible, but, more than likely,, you are not selling yourself real well when you are meeting with the younger manager, either male or female. You are looking across the desk and thinking, "Shit!  They are 30 years old.  They are not going to be interested in me." That's going on in your subconscious and, unfortunately, that's a mistake. There are ways to deal with that issue  but you are not going  into the interview "all in."

That's what you need to be.  All in in these situations.

Hear me out.  Try it.   Go all in.  Push yourself. Don't cop to the belief that it's 60 you're not employable.  I speak from the perspective of  being older than you are and  have worked in search for more than 40 years.  People  would hire me in a heartbeat because they know how talented and successful I am. On an interview, you have to make sure they learn how talented you are.

So get out there  and raise some cane on your interviews and don't use excuses.

Now there was one other phrase that you used – – "options are slim."

You may only be looking on job boards.   When you only look at job boards, there are a finite number of jobs.  You are not out there doing network.  You are staring at the same things coming up over and over again  and saying to yourself, "the options are slim."

In fact, job boards fill, depending upon the statistics you look at, 3 to 6% of all positions..  Recruiters fill another 20 to 25%..  Between the 2, they fill between 30 and 32% of all positions.  The rest are filled by networking.   Of those, approximately 70%, The statistics also say 70% of the 70%  are filled as a result of introductions to people That you didn't know at the beginning of the job search.

You have to go network. You need to talk to people and be referred  to absolute strangers and practice doing informational interviews and practice networking. Get out there.  No excuses.  Don't surrendering to this,, "oh woe is me,," attitude that is implicit in your question. Get hungry again.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Over 50? Over 60: Your Unique Job Search Problems & How to Solve Them | JobSearchTV.com


I discuss a few unique issues that relate to you and your job search.

Summary

So, I just want to start off by saying there are unique issues that come with being an older work. Yes, ageism is an issue, but a lot of the issues that job hunters have who are over 50 (and certainly over 60) relate to the fact that a lot of you have gotten sloppy about so much, you don't really feel like doing it, and it oozes out of your pores.

You don't have the same drive. You don't have the same determination. Frankly, you don't put in smart effort in order to find work. So, yes, I am going to blame the victim here because at the end of the day, you are responsible for all of your outcomes. You can blame ageism to your hearts content, but you still need to find the position.

There is a way that you can short-circuit all of this and that is to start a business, to become a consultant, because, in the case of business owners, in the case of consultants who are operating at a high level like interim roles, looking to be in an interim C level executive for organization, experience is valued.

So, you were brought in in order to be the pro, to do it for a fixed period of time and then leave. So adopting those kind of positions, whether it's starting a business or being an interim exec for a role is a way of short-circuiting the process. .

However, some of the same pointers still apply even to you. And the 1st 2 are kind of linked.

Number 1 is stay fit. I will speak for myself. It's been hard to take off weight period it's been hard to look good. I have gotten fat. I have clothes that the fit me extremely well and a lot of people I talked to don’t. So, I'm at the gym regularly I (right now, I am getting over and injury but still I'm at the gym regularly working out). I sweat. I lift weights. I push myself. You need to do stuff like that plus have your wardrobe do things that call attention to you from a positive perspective, that don’t give people a reason to go, “How old is that that outfit he's wearing? Or, is she wearing something that is from the 70s?”

You know how people are? They get so dismissive. If you don't believe me get on Facebook, again, and take a look at some of the things that people post that are so snarky. So, just be aware of your appearance because that has an effect.

Another thing is practice your skills. Do it at home. You just make the effort to make sure that you don't get sloppy with how you present your knowledge. So, a lot of people I know have been doing their job for so long and so well that they don't have to talk about it well. And they get lazy with. What I will call, “current events,” within their field. You talk to someone 20 years younger than you, it rolls off the tongue so smoothly.. It may not happen that way for you if you practice.

You might also consider, in your presentation, without of alluding to your age by talking about the grandkids, for example. You can talk about the benefits of maturity and your life experience in supporting the lead person or providing access to certain skills and life experiences that a younger worker hasn’t.

You have been there, you've done a lot. It doesn't make you burned out or tired. But what it does do is help you avoid some of the problems, the less experienced worker might not know., So, emphasize some of those attributes when your interview.

I also want to mention networking. Networking is extremely important for you in the value of your network is far greater than the younger workers network. You know senior executives. You know people who are in a position to hire and who can introduce you to other people who can introduce you to roles. So, get out there and talk to people that you know and don't just sit back on your laurels.

The last thing is the tendency that the those of you who are 50 and over have not to take as many interviews. I want to encourage, especially when you 1st getting back in the job search, get out there and take more interviews, even if it's a job that you would never take, even if the commute is too far, because you are going to need some practice. Even if you been a role where you have hired, now you are the other side of the desk period you need to put yourself in the position to practice interviewing so that you don't screw up jobs that really matter.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Should I Apply for a Job At Half My Previous Salary? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/30/should-i-apply-for-a-job-at-half-my-previous-salary-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1271 Should I apply for a job at half the salary I once earned given I’m almost 60 and the options are slim?

Summary

Here's a question I received through quora.   I want to read the full question..

"Should apply for job at half the salary I once earned, given that I'm almost 60 and the options are slim?"

We don't know what this person does professionally;  we just know that they don't have choices.

So I get a look at a few scenarios.  You make $150,000 per year And want to look at a job paying $75,000 per year.  You are a $200,000 a year person  looking at a job paying $100,000 per year.  You are a $100,000 a year person looking at a job paying  50.

Here's the reality to it.  In most of these scenarios, you're not qualified to do the job  at a lower level, nor firm is going to hire you because they are not going to trust whether or not  you are going to jump ship when the market for what you do gets better.

I want to help you and, I have said this in videos that I've done, if you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume.  If you are getting interviews and not invited back, the problem is you don't interview as well as you think you do.  If you are being invited back for 2nd interviews but not getting job offers, you don't have good relationship skills with senior professionals.  Lastly,  if the situation  is that you are getting offers are coming in  lower than what you wanted, you may not be the 1st choice and they are basically saying, "Screw it.  Let's give him a shot and see if he will come in at a lesser price."

It's easy to blame the market Again, we don't know what you do..  Perhaps, you don't have skills that are particularly viable. After all, you may be a $50,000 a year person looking at jobs paying $25,000 per year. That's possible, for example, in social work where you may be a manager at an agency, and are now looking at positions as a caseworker.  You can do that.  You will probably need some refresher because you have been doing oversight for people and haven't been sitting opposite someone Doing case management for a long time.

Recognize that, as a more experienced person, you may no longer have the qualifications  to do the staff level position and you are going to need to be proactive to get the skills up to speed in order to be effective.

So, again, you can do it, but it is not likely to work.

You also say that the opportunities are relatively slim..  I am going to work with another assumption here.

You are passively bringing age discrimination into the conversation and you are using that as the excuse for why you are not getting hired.   It is certainly possible, but, more than likely,, you are not selling yourself real well when you are meeting with the younger manager, either male or female. You are looking across the desk and thinking, "Shit!  They are 30 years old.  They are not going to be interested in me." That's going on in your subconscious and, unfortunately, that's a mistake. There are ways to deal with that issue  but you are not going  into the interview "all in."

That's what you need to be.  All in in these situations.

Hear me out.  Try it.   Go all in.  Push yourself. Don't cop to the belief that it's 60 you're not employable.  I speak from the perspective of  being older than you are and  have worked in search for more than 40 years.  People  would hire me in a heartbeat because they know how talented and successful I am. On an interview, you have to make sure they learn how talented you are.

So get out there  and raise some cane on your interviews and don't use excuses.

Now there was one other phrase that you used – – "options are slim."

You may only be looking on job boards.   When you only look at job boards, there are a finite number of jobs.  You are not out there doing network.  You are staring at the same things coming up over and over again  and saying to yourself, "the options are slim."

In fact, job boards fill, depending upon the statistics you look at, 3 to 6% of all positions..  Recruiters fill another 20 to 25%..  Between the 2, they fill between 30 and 32% of all positions.  The rest are filled by networking.   Of those, approximately 70%, The statistics also say 70% of the 70%  are filled as a result of introductions to people That you didn't know at the beginning of the job search.

You have to go network. You need to talk to people and be referred  to absolute strangers and practice doing informational interviews and practice networking. Get out there.  No excuses.  Don't surrendering to this,, "oh woe is me,," attitude that is implicit in your question. Get hungry again.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Over 60 Job Search | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/07/20/over-60-job-search-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1170 Job hunting when you are over 60

[/spp-transcript]

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Tough Interview Questions: Are You Sure You Want an Entry Level Position? | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

This is a question it’s often asked of older workers who are considering a career change in order to do work that they like.

Summary

I’ve got a good tough interview question! I summarized it with the headline for this 1 and it says, “are you sure you want an entry-level position?”

Here's the real scenario. Someone is “an older worker.”

“Are you sure you willing to start a position just to get your foot in the door?”

I am going to take a further. You’re 40, 45, 50! Older than that! Would you be willing to go entry-level here?

So, this is 1 of those dilemmas for firms because they get the idea that career progression means being you start at 20; you work your Way up the ranks and they don't understand that people actually want to do things that they want to and not just be a dumb drone sitting in the corner somewhere.

So, how do you respond to an imbecile like this who wants to know whether you're sure that you be open to an entry-level position?

The answer is really very simple but you have to act. You have to treat this as theater and you have to be personally persuasive. You have to look ask them square in the eye and change your tone of voice and speak a little bit more slowly. Then, say something to the effect of, “You know, sometimes you have to take a professional step back in order to move your career forward. So, joining you in an entry-level role basically is going to help me learn. What I'm looking for is a chance-- a chance to interact with customers, retailers, suppliers (whoever the user population would be) and basically learn the product over the course of time. What I'm looking for is a chance. Yes, I am willing to take an entry-level position just to get my foot in the door so that, in this way, I can start building my credentials, have people trust me and be able to do the kind of work I enjoy.”.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

I’m Over 60. Should I Hide My Age? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/07/06/im-over-60-should-i-hide-my-age-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1156 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a job hunter about whether they should remove references to age in their resume.

Summary

I received a message this morning from someone with I phone interviewed last week who had a question for me. I thought this would apply to other people beyond him, so, I thought I would as a video, rather than just to write back to him. So, there is the question. For people over 60 and looking for a job, should we consider removing reference to age on the websites, my life etc. to better our chances of getting interviews?

I want to start this by saying that bigotry obviously exists but the particularly, ageism. So, let's recognize that, accept that and make firm squirm. That to me doesn't mean removing items from your resume based upon age, but I think in terms of relevance.

I'm 64 so when I think in terms of things that I did in 1971 when I graduated college or in 1972, this could probably be best put on a resume as a summary. So, as you look at your resume, look at relevance, rather than age as being the variable.

I would take of the year on the degree if I were you? Probably. But the truth of the matter is, what difference does it make? You are going to walk in the door, and are they are going to talk to you and they are going to say, “Gee! It’s an old guy,” if they are going to be bigoted.

If they aren’t going to be bigoted, they are going to look at you for your skills and experience and that's the firm that you want to work for. Why put yourself in the awkward situation? To me, it's always better to reveal and not do stupid interviews with people who are bigoted, rather than put myself in the position where I'm dragging myself to a location to talk to someone who is only can give me a courtesy interview because their biases are so profound that they're not going to listen.

Then, I’m going to have to work hard to last that long period of time and have no chance of getting hired.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Over 60 Job Search | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1170 Job hunting when you are over 60

Summary

Mostly advice I read online for people who are over 60, frankly, it is infuriating. It basically suggested all you want to do is retire, have the easiest job imaginable... You might as well be a Walmart greeter or work for messenger service as a dispatcher. Awful stuff!

Most people I talked to who are over 60 aren't ready to slow down. They are looking for careers in income comparable to what they been earning throughout their lives. What good is it to be advising someone to take a job as a dispatcher? Ridiculous.

Here's what I want to suggest. There are lots of people who know your work who are in different organizations. In this is the prime time for networking. You get yourself out there talking to people who know your work, who you been involved with before who are different organizations. You get yourself a networking groups, You start talking to people. You apply for jobs.

Focus on recent work that you done, not the stuff that you did, let's say, not the stuff. When Richard Nixon or Gerald Ford were president. Focus on work that you done over the last 10 or 15 years of your career in your resume.

Again, network relentlessly. If you're not in shape, make sure you get into shape. Spend a little time at the gym. That's if you're out of work. If you are working at want to change jobs, they look at is like any other job search. You're looking for quality opportunity. You're not looking for someone's third-rate choice..

Don't buy into the bull. You have options out there galore. Yes, it is true that there is ageism and there going to be some firms where their bigoted managers who are good be out to get you. Welcome to the world.

And, that was certainly true when you were 20 and their bigoted managers there who wouldn't give you a shot either. This is just the other end of the curve.

Get yourself out there talking to people. Get yourself out there with responses to ads. Focus on the networking because you have far more options and far more opportunities now with networking than you did when you are beginner.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

I’m Over 60. Should I Hide My Age? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1156 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a job hunter about whether they should remove references to age in their resume.

Summary

I received a message this morning from someone with I phone interviewed last week who had a question for me. I thought this would apply to other people beyond him, so, I thought I would as a video, rather than just to write back to him. So, there is the question. For people over 60 and looking for a job, should we consider removing reference to age on the websites, my life etc. to better our chances of getting interviews?

I want to start this by saying that bigotry obviously exists but the particularly, ageism. So, let's recognize that, accept that and make firm squirm. That to me doesn't mean removing items from your resume based upon age, but I think in terms of relevance.

I'm 64 so when I think in terms of things that I did in 1971 when I graduated college or in 1972, this could probably be best put on a resume as a summary. So, as you look at your resume, look at relevance, rather than age as being the variable.

I would take of the year on the degree if I were you? Probably. But the truth of the matter is, what difference does it make? You are going to walk in the door, and are they are going to talk to you and they are going to say, “Gee! It’s an old guy,” if they are going to be bigoted.

If they aren’t going to be bigoted, they are going to look at you for your skills and experience and that's the firm that you want to work for. Why put yourself in the awkward situation? To me, it's always better to reveal and not do stupid interviews with people who are bigoted, rather than put myself in the position where I'm dragging myself to a location to talk to someone who is only can give me a courtesy interview because their biases are so profound that they're not going to listen.

Then, I’m going to have to work hard to last that long period of time and have no chance of getting hired.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Job Search Radio

Over 50 and Job Hunting | JobSearchRadio.com

I spoke an AARP meeting yesterday to over 100 people over the age of 50.  I left feeling depressed because of how ill-prepared these people were to look for work.  I hope that will not be your circumstances but, if it is, follow my advice and get some help.

Summary

Recently,I did 2 presentations at an AARP conference 2 groups of over 50 job hunters.I had over 100 people between the 2 meetings. One presentation was for about 40 minutes; the other was for about an hour.

For those of you who are over 50 (I don't care if you are hitting this as a current crop of Boomers or as Gen X professionals), I had people from many different professions in the room.

I felt badly for the people there because they given a lot to their organizations for years And now clearly needed help with job hunting.. I want to say, the people who are over 50 that it is not enough to go out there and just apply for jobs. You can get one that way, but the old ways A finding work by answering ads online have gone by the wayside. There are many more ways to do it.

There are skills needed to find a job and they are different than those needed to do a job. As a result, if you just think that you can apply for jobs, you have missed all the networking opportunities that fill positions. You have limited yourself to the few jobs (and I have to say few because once you start looking at a job as you notice how few there are out there) That are advertised. Advertising jobs has gotten expensive.

You have to do things differently than what you may have done previously to find a job. That is especially true as you become a more senior professional.For you senior professionals and those of you in skilled areas, I will say as I said to an executive last night, if you think about the typical organizational structure There is a pyramid structure.. As you move up The pyramid,, there are fewer jobs higher up in the pyramid than the room lower down.

The result is that you have to network and you have to do things to prepare for your interviews that may be different than what you did previously.

I have a 7 day free trial at JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. Join and experiment with the site. See if it makes sense for you and I will also answer job search questions you have. I hope you'll stay with me because there's a lot more That you will need to learn and you have to practice.

Take advantage of the trial and start learning some of the things or reminding yourself of some of the things of some of the things you normally don't need to have in your consciousness on a day-to-day basis because it isn't part of your repertoire professionally.

Get some help. Get some coaching. It will make a difference to you.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Where Can a 70 Year Old Man Find a Job | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2018/05/24/where-can-a-70-year-old-man-find-a-job-jobsearchradio-com/

An answer to this question I read got me angry.  I answer the question for myself here.

Summary

I was on Quora this morning and saw someone posted a question. The question was, "Where can a 70-year-old man find a job?" The most uploaded answer was the 70-year-old man can find the jobs at a lot of places. Grocery stores. Landscaping offices. Clerks at gas stations. Consultant in the tech field. Tutor. Temp worker. Uber driver. Model for art school. Pizza delivery. Salesman.

There are 20 answers that this person gives and I read this and thought to myself, "Man! They don't have any idea that they are being ageist and have a bias that shows up." We look at these choices, they have no idea what this person's experience is. All that they know is that this is a 70-year-old man is looking for a job.

Why can't they find the job in whatever their field is? That wasn't addressed and wasn't even a consideration in coming up with these answers! It goes back to this notion that older workers are less able and less competent than workers who are not as old or younger workers. It is nonsense.

I just want to say that if you are 70 or above, if you have expertise in a particular field, go for that area of expertise. You know you will have to deal with the issue of bias and you might as well just take it head-on. I have videos and have spoken the individuals who are 60 and above about finding work in questions that they will be asked on interviews. Take a look at those videos. I think the playlist on YouTube talks about "over 50." That's really when the bias starts to come in.

Again, for you as a 70-year-old worker, for any person who is a 70-year-old worker. Yes, you can find jobs doing the kind of work mentioned answer. That assumes that you may only want to do part-time work or work that is less "strenuous." Looking at their answer , I think they are talking about less mentally strenuous, not necessarily physically strenuous.

Working at a Home Depot or a Lowe's or being a security guard. Those are some of the answers that were given! Why can't you do the kind of work you've always done if that is what you want to do? Why can't you consult organizations that want to bring you on and just don't have the hours needed so you work some hours for them and hours for other people?

There are lots of things that you are able to do you just have to learn to sell your ability to a market that may not understand it. It's not that tough. All you have to do is take it straight on , and if they don't believe you, you haven't established the. Credibility with them yet. You have to brand yourself within your field and not simply knocking on doors applying for jobs. Have job seeking you out.

Again, the notion that you are "less man," is ridiculous. Go out there and do whatever you did before and that will be perfectly fine.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Would you like to connect with a motivated audience of job hunters. Email [email protected]
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