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JobSearchTV.com

Get an Offer Letter | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to get an offer letter before resigning your job.

Summary

I want to talk to you today about the most important piece of information I can teach you about negotiating salary. And I'm going to start with a story of someone I knew some years ago; I was representing him with a client.
They orally extended an offer. He accepted, he gives his notice. Suddenly, they call him up and they go, "Well, we've been thinking about it and we decided we can't afford to hire you." And although I told him to the contrary, he'd given his notice without getting an offer letter.
What is an offer letter? An offer letter is, of course, a written document issued by an employer that confirms the details of the offer. It doesn't usually go through the benefits; that's normally in a brochure that comes separately from the offer letter. The benefits brochure's normally referenced in the letter. So if you're looking for information about benefits, you're not going to find that there.
Normally, it will say something about along the lines of congratulations on your decision to join such and such firm. We know it's a great choice and we think you'll be a wonderful addition to our firm. You're starting salary will be (It will quote it either on an annualized basis or on the basis of a pay period, something along those lines). It'll talk with you about other certain basic obvious terms and conditions.
Ultimately, it comes down to your salary. It's specifically mentioned there. Why is that important? Real simple. It's your legal protection. Imagine for a second you started a job and you expected one salary and suddenly your check says something very different. You go, "Hey, I was told this number. This is less. No one told me."Hello. How do you prove this at that point? You're already on board. Yeah, you can quit your job but who's getting hurt there?
You.
You never want to put yourself in that position where you're vulnerable. Almost every firm issues an offer letter or, if they don't, it's red flag to, because that is your legal protection against shenanigans. You never want to have to go through what this fellow did with me calling up this firm and going, "He gave his notice. Now I know he can't prove it. But he told me that you issued this offer. He'll sue you. So you can go through this and I'm sure you'll win, but do you really want to go through this?
And they said, "no," and they backed down and they made him an employee. But for those few hours, this guy was scared to death. You never want to put yourself in that position. An offer letter is a regular part of business. You never resign your job until you or your agent has that letter in hand and confirms the basic data that you were told orally. Without that you could have real problems.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Should I Take A Lower Offer? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/02/21/should-i-take-a-lower-offer-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1385 A question from someone about accepting a job offer for less money than you want.

Summary

The question I was asked, "Should I accept less money?" I want to start off by saying that my bias is against doing it. I also want to lay out cases where it makes sense. There aren't many, but there are a few instances where it does make sense. But going back to the conclusion I believe the general you don't do it.

The few circumstances where it makes sense are:

1. The great opportunity. To me, there are relatively few great opportunities but I am not in your seat and don't live your life. You have to decide what a great opportunity is for you that would cause you to accept less. For the person making $100,000 a year, for the person making $200,000 a year, the notion of accepting a few dollars less for the "great opportunity" may not be a big deal. For the person making $50,000 a year, it is a different story. But that person you have to weigh the alternatives and come to your decision about whether it's worth your while.

2. If you been out of work for a long time. For you, you have a job right now and you don't have a career. You been out of work for 6, 8, 9, 12 months… Longer? Someone is making a job offer to you for less money than you earned "back when" you have a job or career right now. It's over. The fact it's that someone is willing to give you a shot after so many people have turned you down… That's a circumstance to consider it.

Understand though that often firms are negotiating.

They will talk about the individual who they've met with who is looking really strong and we are weighing the 2 of you and this person is willing to accept less. That's 1 of the classics and areas the firms dredge up. That's 1 of the classic scenarios that firms used to finesse you into accepting less money.

Frankly, I would turn around and say, "Thanks for bringing that to my attention. The fact is that if you believe this is a better person for this role, you should really choose them. If we are really equal and they are willing to accept less, you should choose them. For me, I look at it as, "I cost more but I bring greater productivity. If I haven't convinced you of that yet, talk with me about the perceived differences between us and let's address that." The fact that they are raising. This is the subject indicates that it is close. They do see a difference between the 2 of you; otherwise they would try to bring you down to that price point. After all, why bother to have this conversation. They could have just chosen the other person.

That's a factor. They are using a negotiating ploy.

Another factor that you need to take into consideration it is not about accepting $5000 or $10,000 less now, it is that accepting less money affects every dollar you ever earn for that firm and every other firm from now on, All because you accepted less money now. They build their raises based on what you are currently earning, right?

Using simple numbers, if you accept $5000 less now or are making $110,000 and accept $100,000, if you get a 5% increase, you are now at $105,000. Had you been at $110,000, the race would have been higher, right? Understand that there is an impact now and when you change jobs from a few years in the future, 2 or 3 years from now. After all, they are formulating their increases based upon what you are currently earning.

For now, in Massachusetts, that will become different next year, when a law goes into effect prohibiting employers from asking about your salary. For most organizations in most parts of the country, they are basing wage increases on current salary. They don't care that you took $10,000 less to join your current firm. They work off the current numbers because that's a fact. Understand there's an impact upon you that you will never recover from.

As you can tell, generally, I am against accepting less money. If it means so much to an organization that you accept $5000 or $10,000 less, there is a bigger problem there in terms of how your marketing yourself that you need to address.

Generally, thumbs down to the notion of accepting less except in the circumstances that I've already outlined..

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Should I Take A Lower Offer? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/02/21/should-i-take-a-lower-offer-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1385 A question from someone about accepting a job offer for less money than you want.

Summary

The question I was asked, "Should I accept less money?" I want to start off by saying that my bias is against doing it. I also want to lay out cases where it makes sense. There aren't many, but there are a few instances where it does make sense. But going back to the conclusion I believe the general you don't do it.

The few circumstances where it makes sense are:

1. The great opportunity. To me, there are relatively few great opportunities but I am not in your seat and don't live your life. You have to decide what a great opportunity is for you that would cause you to accept less. For the person making $100,000 a year, for the person making $200,000 a year, the notion of accepting a few dollars less for the "great opportunity" may not be a big deal. For the person making $50,000 a year, it is a different story. But that person you have to weigh the alternatives and come to your decision about whether it's worth your while.

2. If you been out of work for a long time. For you, you have a job right now and you don't have a career. You been out of work for 6, 8, 9, 12 months… Longer? Someone is making a job offer to you for less money than you earned "back when" you have a job or career right now. It's over. The fact it's that someone is willing to give you a shot after so many people have turned you down… That's a circumstance to consider it.

Understand though that often firms are negotiating.

They will talk about the individual who they've met with who is looking really strong and we are weighing the 2 of you and this person is willing to accept less. That's 1 of the classics and areas the firms dredge up. That's 1 of the classic scenarios that firms used to finesse you into accepting less money.

Frankly, I would turn around and say, "Thanks for bringing that to my attention. The fact is that if you believe this is a better person for this role, you should really choose them. If we are really equal and they are willing to accept less, you should choose them. For me, I look at it as, "I cost more but I bring greater productivity. If I haven't convinced you of that yet, talk with me about the perceived differences between us and let's address that." The fact that they are raising. This is the subject indicates that it is close. They do see a difference between the 2 of you; otherwise they would try to bring you down to that price point. After all, why bother to have this conversation. They could have just chosen the other person.

That's a factor. They are using a negotiating ploy.

Another factor that you need to take into consideration it is not about accepting $5000 or $10,000 less now, it is that accepting less money affects every dollar you ever earn for that firm and every other firm from now on, All because you accepted less money now. They build their raises based on what you are currently earning, right?

Using simple numbers, if you accept $5000 less now or are making $110,000 and accept $100,000, if you get a 5% increase, you are now at $105,000. Had you been at $110,000, the race would have been higher, right? Understand that there is an impact now and when you change jobs from a few years in the future, 2 or 3 years from now. After all, they are formulating their increases based upon what you are currently earning.

For now, in Massachusetts, that will become different next year, when a law goes into effect prohibiting employers from asking about your salary. For most organizations in most parts of the country, they are basing wage increases on current salary. They don't care that you took $10,000 less to join your current firm. They work off the current numbers because that's a fact. Understand there's an impact upon you that you will never recover from.

As you can tell, generally, I am against accepting less money. If it means so much to an organization that you accept $5000 or $10,000 less, there is a bigger problem there in terms of how your marketing yourself that you need to address.

Generally, thumbs down to the notion of accepting less except in the circumstances that I've already outlined..

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice

Avoid Discussing Salary | No BS Hiring Advice


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it is not in your firm’s interest to show your hand before extending a job offer to someone.

Summary

Today, I want to offer you some no BS hiring advice in the realm of salary negotiation with candidates. Now, as an HR professional business owner, manager, at an organization that's involved with hiring, negotiations are always one of those tricky issues. You want to get someone for the least amount of money, but you also want to make them happy. So, you don't want to necessarily squeeze them. But you also don't want to overpay because, after all, you've got a budget to contend with.
Often, hiring managers, HR professionals, you know you are you going into a negotiation with a candidate or with someone like me, a recruiter who's representing a candidate (NOTE: I no longer do recruiting) and you get to a point in the negotiation where you reveal your hand about what you're willing to pay for someone. Probably, not a good idea.
Now, let me break it into two parts. First part is with a candidate. By telling them, "the most I'm willing to pay is such and such . . . " I'm not talking about we're screening someone ithe very beginning. I'm talking about at the pre-offer phase when you're really in the negotiation phase about salary . . . what you've done is basically tell them this is the max I'm willing to pay and, if you offer them five cents less, they are going to go, "What happened? You said you'd pay to such and such but you came in less." It impacts your ability to make them happy, make it attractive for them to join . . .What have you.
You're better off in those kind of situations offering a little bit less than what you're prepared to offer. So, in this way, if you come in higher than that, they get a little bit more enthusiastic. One of my clients has that built into their offer scenario where they talk about less. If they get the person for less, great! But, at the same time, was prepared to go a few dollars higher. They are able to show, time and again, that this is a tactic that, for them, saves some money and, if necessary, they are already slotted for more so there's no sweat.
The second part of this is in talking with recruiters like I was, I worked very closely with my clients. I don't play games. Some recruiters play games and, you know, the issue comes down to you're about to make an offer to someone. They will know how much are you going to offer? How much are you going to offer?
What they're trying to do is close the candidate for you and that sounds great . . . but if you tell them, "well, I can go up to (I will pick a number of random) $10 and you offer them $7.50, or, let me be clear about that, you're prepared to go to 10, but initially you want them to to offer them $8, so, if they say yes to $8, great!
If you need to, you'll go to $10, you tell that to a recruiter, they're not going to try to hard because they know they've got the 10 locked up and their fee is contingent upon how much you want to pay. And, I'll simply say that, especially for contingency recruiting firms, you know, it's better not to let them in on the numbers. The executive search which I try to do with many of my clients even though, often, I operate on a contingency basis, I'm working for my institutional customer.
Yes, I have to deliver a candidate to you but, you know, at the same time, I'm trying to be fair. I want to have that strong relationship with you and I don't play games. So, if you tell me you're prepared to go to $10 but you'd like me to offer $8, I'm going to do that. I'm going to work toward closing it. I've done that many many times. But ,you know, for most recruiters, you can hold back that extra information because, otherwise, there's no financial incentive for them, particularly in the contingency world.
So, better to hold back. Don't always be so revealing about the numbers you're prepared to pay. Make the recruiter work that much harder in order to close the sale. It saves your organization money.
Hey, it's not your effort that's going into this.It is the recruiter's and, if you burn out one, there's gonna be another one who's gonna replace them. And, frankly, if they're doing deals with you, they're going to keep working. So like I said, hold back on what the numbers are going to be so this way, you know, you're not just giving away extra money unnecessarily.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

JobSearchaGram: Job Offer


This is a short video about what to consider when you get a job offer.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Evaluating the Job Offer | JobSearchTV.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter reminds you of some financial criteria to evaluate before accepting a job offer.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about evaluating the job offer when you get it.
Now, this isn't about negotiating the job offer. This is about the evaluation process and everyone tends to focus on salary and rightly so. But they tend to focus on the top line number or gross salary without taking into consideration some of the secondary criteria for evaluating the offer.
So, for example, I used to live in the New York area and for people who lived out of state they had to also take into consideration the difference in taxes. So, for example, if you live in Connecticut and work them to Connecticut, you had one tax that you would pay for to the state. However, if you start to work in New York State or New York City, you had a different tax structure to consider that might affect the net number. So, let's work with a simple example.
You get an offer for a $10,000 increase but you're going to have to work in New York City. Now, there's a commutation cost that's different than what you had when you drove to work. There's also a difference in your taxes because the New York taxes are higher than the Connecticut taxes. The money that you paid in New York is credited against your Connecticut taxes, but it's higher. You don't have the wear and tear on your car because all you have to do is drive the train station, but a $300 train ticket is basically costing you almost your entire raise. So, remember to consider the net number when you evaluate the offer.
Also, remember to consider the value of the benefits and the cost to you. Now, for some people, they're joining an organization and the real reason is because they have superior benefits to what they currently have. That's not just simply about cash bonuses for profit sharing which you need to take into consideration. After all. if a company has match on a 401K that's superior to what you have, that's real money in your pocket because you're going to be able to invest that towards your retirement and, even if you don't think that's important, don't be dumb. Take advantage of that because, frankly, eventually you get to be old and you like having that money set aside. Trust me!
So, you have to look at benefits and the simplest thing is cost of the insurance. You know, you're a married person with two kids at home and suddenly have a non-contributory benefits package. I know it's a big saving. You may have only been paying $200 a month at your last job, but that's still two and a half thousand dollars a year in savings that you have that you're not going to be paying for anymore.
Another thing to consider. I have a client that has an extraordinary benefits package and, additionally, they do free lunch for the employees. It's brought to their desk every day. They are handed a menu in the morning. By 11 o'clock, you fill it out. It's delivered to your desk at 12:30. Nice little gift, especially when you're in Midtown Manhattan where these folks are. Do you think lunches are $2? Of course not. Free lunch delivered to the desk. Completely free benefits. Very nice!
So, my reminder to you is when you evaluate the offer, you have to remember the about all the ancillary benefits. Now, those benefits, again, could also include the taxes, the cost of insurance, the cost of commutation, the cost of wear and tear on your car, whether you driving more or less to get to the new position. I don't want to take time into consideration because that's not going to be a factor from the employer's standpoint. So, you're kidding yourself, but, for you, you have to consider whether or not those that extra 30 minutes in the car for example, is worth it. Or that extra hour commuting to another city on the commuter train or bus is worth it. What you can do with that time if you had it or if you give it up.
So, these are all factors you need to take into consideration when you evaluate a job offer

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Is It a Good Idea To Tell Them You Already Have an Offer? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/03/is-it-a-good-idea-to-tell-them-you-already-have-an-offer

EP 1245 Is It a Good Idea To Tell Them You Already Have an Offer from a Rival in Order to Convey Scarcity? It depends. 

Summary

I have a question from someone. "Is it a good idea to tell the interviewer that you have another offer from a rival in order to convey scarcity?"

If you are a hiring manager and you hear this, you just want to put a bullet in your head because the notion that there is scarcity is imbecilic. There is no scarcity as far as labor is concerned; there are plenty of people available who do what you do in most geographic areas and, if you want to pressure them, most times/ most hiring managers I know are conditioned to respond in this way: so, uh, what kind of position is involved? What sort of money are they talking with you about if you find this job so interesting, why are you here?"

It is probably a bluff that you can't pull off because to parse your scenario sufficiently so that you confess that the other job isn't so good you should be interviewing with them.

They argue the scarcity of the skill.

*What sort of money are they talking with you about?"

"Why do you find this job so interesting?"

"If you fight his job so interesting, why don't you just take it? Why are you here?"

At the end of the day, it is probably a bluff that you cannot pull off because they will pick apart your scenario sufficiently that you will confess that the other job is not that good and that you should be interviewing with them.

They don't view it is scarcity; they they are looking at this with bewilderment, particularly if it is a 1st interview. Like I'm looking at this as an early stage scenario.

I also want to say that it is different later on in the process where you have had a few interviews where you now state, "I have another offer." I want to be clear with you that if you don't have another offer and you try this tactic, they may call your bluff and say, "We are not ready to make a choice. If you are telling us that you are going to take this other job, we wish you well and if it doesn't work out, reach out to us and we have another position, we will continue the conversation then."

You see, there is no real leverage that you have if you think you can pull this off without actually having another offer. If you have another offer, then you can say, "Look, I have this other offer that I need to respond to by such and such date and time." If they ask questions, you can be forthright about it, hear from them about the position in greater detail more quickly I get a sense of the employer about what their timeline is.

In doing so, what you have done is balance the power differential. Without that other offer, it is a joke because, at the end of the day, your holding (I'm going to use a card game scenario), you don't have an ace in the hole to pull out. Basically, you have a deuce. As a result, you get left holding the bag.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Is It a Good Idea To Tell Them You Already Have an Offer?

EP 1245 Is It a Good Idea To Tell Them You Already Have an Offer from a Rival in Order to Convey Scarcity? It depends. 

Summary

I have a question from someone. "Is it a good idea to tell the interviewer that you have another offer from a rival in order to convey scarcity?"

If you are a hiring manager and you hear this, you just want to put a bullet in your head because the notion that there is scarcity is imbecilic. There is no scarcity as far as labor is concerned; there are plenty of people available who do what you do in most geographic areas and, if you want to pressure them, most times/ most hiring managers I know are conditioned to respond in this way: so, uh, what kind of position is involved? What sort of money are they talking with you about if you find this job so interesting, why are you here?"

It is probably a bluff that you can't pull off because to parse your scenario sufficiently so that you confess that the other job isn't so good you should be interviewing with them.

They argue the scarcity of the skill.

*What sort of money are they talking with you about?"

"Why do you find this job so interesting?"

"If you fight his job so interesting, why don't you just take it? Why are you here?"

At the end of the day, it is probably a bluff that you cannot pull off because they will pick apart your scenario sufficiently that you will confess that the other job is not that good and that you should be interviewing with them.

They don't view it is scarcity; they they are looking at this with bewilderment, particularly if it is a 1st interview. Like I'm looking at this as an early stage scenario.

I also want to say that it is different later on in the process where you have had a few interviews where you now state, "I have another offer." I want to be clear with you that if you don't have another offer and you try this tactic, they may call your bluff and say, "We are not ready to make a choice. If you are telling us that you are going to take this other job, we wish you well and if it doesn't work out, reach out to us and we have another position, we will continue the conversation then."

You see, there is no real leverage that you have if you think you can pull this off without actually having another offer. If you have another offer, then you can say, "Look, I have this other offer that I need to respond to by such and such date and time." If they ask questions, you can be forthright about it, hear from them about the position in greater detail more quickly I get a sense of the employer about what their timeline is.

In doing so, what you have done is balance the power differential. Without that other offer, it is a joke because, at the end of the day, your holding (I'm going to use a card game scenario), you don't have an ace in the hole to pull out. Basically, you have a deuce. As a result, you get left holding the bag.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice

They Accepted the Offer But Now You Sense Something Wrong | No BS Hiring Advice


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice about what to do when that candidate who accepted your job offer starts to misbehave.

 

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

 

JobSearchTV.com

Deciding Between Multiple Job Offers | JobSearchTV.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the process you should use to decide between two or more job offers.

Summary

One of my subscribers sent me a message through YouTube asking the question that basically translates into, “How do I decide between multiple job offers?”

Well, the answer to that is actually pretty easy and let me just explain. Before you start your job search, you have to sit down and ask yourself this question, “what's most important to you in the next job or organization? What will I need to see or hear to believe that it's the right place for me to join?”

Once you have asked and answered that question, it is easy because you can matchup the jobs are proposed and the way the firm is explaining the upside to these opportunities to you with your own particular goals and ambitions. You can matchup compensation that you were looking for with what's been offered to you.

This it doesn’t mean that you can't be flexible and frankly, you should be, because, often, the original requirements are not based on any reality. They’re completely ungrounded magical kind of thought .

“Oh, I wish I could become the such and such. No, I'm a programmer and love to be the CIO.” Completely unrealistic.

But, assuming that you were realistic with what your interests and motivations were, line up your offers against those goals. Having done that, once you have it narrowed down to a preference, then you have to do one extra step.

Assuming that I may need to look for job again, what will this opportunity do for me in terms of the marketplace, in terms of my marketability, in terms of what my long-term goals are, not just simply what you want to accomplish now but what you look at want to accomplish of your career.

Once you match those of up, sometimes your answer becomes a little bit different. But only you know how you should weight the scale; by that I mean only you know what you should put extra emphasis on. Is it the money now or the upside potential in the future?

I can’t answer that kind of a question; only you can. But, that's the mechanics of how you should really go about doing it.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.