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Should I Take A Lower Offer? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/02/21/should-i-take-a-lower-offer-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1385 A question from someone about accepting a job offer for less money than you want.

Summary

The question I was asked, "Should I accept less money?" I want to start off by saying that my bias is against doing it. I also want to lay out cases where it makes sense. There aren't many, but there are a few instances where it does make sense. But going back to the conclusion I believe the general you don't do it.

The few circumstances where it makes sense are:

1. The great opportunity. To me, there are relatively few great opportunities but I am not in your seat and don't live your life. You have to decide what a great opportunity is for you that would cause you to accept less. For the person making $100,000 a year, for the person making $200,000 a year, the notion of accepting a few dollars less for the "great opportunity" may not be a big deal. For the person making $50,000 a year, it is a different story. But that person you have to weigh the alternatives and come to your decision about whether it's worth your while.

2. If you been out of work for a long time. For you, you have a job right now and you don't have a career. You been out of work for 6, 8, 9, 12 months… Longer? Someone is making a job offer to you for less money than you earned "back when" you have a job or career right now. It's over. The fact it's that someone is willing to give you a shot after so many people have turned you down… That's a circumstance to consider it.

Understand though that often firms are negotiating.

They will talk about the individual who they've met with who is looking really strong and we are weighing the 2 of you and this person is willing to accept less. That's 1 of the classics and areas the firms dredge up. That's 1 of the classic scenarios that firms used to finesse you into accepting less money.

Frankly, I would turn around and say, "Thanks for bringing that to my attention. The fact is that if you believe this is a better person for this role, you should really choose them. If we are really equal and they are willing to accept less, you should choose them. For me, I look at it as, "I cost more but I bring greater productivity. If I haven't convinced you of that yet, talk with me about the perceived differences between us and let's address that." The fact that they are raising. This is the subject indicates that it is close. They do see a difference between the 2 of you; otherwise they would try to bring you down to that price point. After all, why bother to have this conversation. They could have just chosen the other person.

That's a factor. They are using a negotiating ploy.

Another factor that you need to take into consideration it is not about accepting $5000 or $10,000 less now, it is that accepting less money affects every dollar you ever earn for that firm and every other firm from now on, All because you accepted less money now. They build their raises based on what you are currently earning, right?

Using simple numbers, if you accept $5000 less now or are making $110,000 and accept $100,000, if you get a 5% increase, you are now at $105,000. Had you been at $110,000, the race would have been higher, right? Understand that there is an impact now and when you change jobs from a few years in the future, 2 or 3 years from now. After all, they are formulating their increases based upon what you are currently earning.

For now, in Massachusetts, that will become different next year, when a law goes into effect prohibiting employers from asking about your salary. For most organizations in most parts of the country, they are basing wage increases on current salary. They don't care that you took $10,000 less to join your current firm. They work off the current numbers because that's a fact. Understand there's an impact upon you that you will never recover from.

As you can tell, generally, I am against accepting less money. If it means so much to an organization that you accept $5000 or $10,000 less, there is a bigger problem there in terms of how your marketing yourself that you need to address.

Generally, thumbs down to the notion of accepting less except in the circumstances that I've already outlined..

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

On the Outside Looking In? | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter he answers a viewer’s question about what she should do while working in a bad environment.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews,

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Does HR Share Applications? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/02/14/does-hr-share-applications-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1375 Do HR professionals cross reference the applications they receive with other job openings they have?

Summary

I received a wonderful question. "Do HR professionals cross reference applications they receive with other openings that they have?"

The person that is writing is a technology professional and they continue on by saying, "since some positions have skills in common, do HR professionals cross reference applications with other jobs they have available and of applied for a role that might also be a fit for some other role?"

I'm going to give you the most blunt direct answer because I'm in no BS kinda guy. The answer is… It depends!

I know what they should do but here's the practicality to it. Each HR person is being graded on their performance against certain metrics that the firm has defined for them. Their job is to fill positions, not refer to someone else who feels positions.

It depends on how the system was set up. It depends on which person and which job you applied to. Let me go back to my 1st point about contacting the firm. Never EVER apply for a job through an applicant tracking system because that just puts you into the dreaded black hole. That means your resume is dependent upon whether the data dictionary (the definition of terms set up in the applicant tracking system) and your resume matchup.

Assuming that they do you actually get to a human being, the next thing is whether that person will actually think of a colleague or focus on their own job 1st? The answer is they are going to focus own their job first, then, MAYBE refer you to that other person in their HR organization for consideration. After all, they get no points for this; the other person does. Thus, they go sequentially rather than concurrently. After all, they don't want to have 2 or 3 managers competing over one person. That makes it harder for the firm so they go sequentially evaluating for one job before releasing you for a 2nd, or possibly, 1/3. From there, it is always going to be hit or miss, depending upon your performance on the 1st interview.

Let's assume you do well on the 1st interview and get to the hiring manager (or get through the technical interview and being brought back to meet the hiring manager, to use the example from the original question) after getting through the technical interview and they assess you for where your strengths really are, you get to the hiring manager and then are turned down. From there, they go back to your strengths as perceived on the technical interview and MAYBE you get referred to the other job. MAYBE you don't get referred because your technical skills were really best in that 1st area and not as good a fit for the 2nd or 3rd group.

Maybe you washed out on the 1st interview because you steak up the joint on what you claim to be very good at and they'll see a reason to bring you back for something else.

As a result, there are way too many variables to count on HR to refer you for another position. Those variables start off with:
1. Whether your resume actually makes it through
2. They're going to qualify you for one job at a time rather than multiples.
3. How your performance was on the 1st interview.
4. The mood of the HR person as to whether or not they make the referral

I know some people would disagree with me. "I would definitely refer." That is not my experience. I have heard stories from HR people who are not going to make the referral because it is not in their interest to do so.

There are way too many variables. I wouldn't count on it.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search,

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Ask Me Anything About Job Hunting | JobSearchTV.com

Why don’t recruiters get back to applicants? x

Should I use my middle initial on my resume when applying for a job?

How would you handle a question in a job interview where you are asked if you will verbally pledge, that if hired, you will not leave the job for a competitor for at least 2 years, regardless of how attractive an offer you might receive?

What should I do after sending an email to a recruiter asking about the hiring decision but he didn’t reply?

When a recruiter or interviewer asks you why you want to leave your job, what is the best answer?

Do you need a cover letter to apply for a job?

What are good follow-up questions to ask an employer at the end of an interview (sales position)?

How important is it for job titles in a background check to be totally accurate?

Why is it hard to find jobs without personal connections to the employer?

Why are so many employers so afraid to hire students or recent graduates?

 

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Should I Take A Lower Offer? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/02/21/should-i-take-a-lower-offer-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1385 A question from someone about accepting a job offer for less money than you want.

Summary

The question I was asked, "Should I accept less money?" I want to start off by saying that my bias is against doing it. I also want to lay out cases where it makes sense. There aren't many, but there are a few instances where it does make sense. But going back to the conclusion I believe the general you don't do it.

The few circumstances where it makes sense are:

1. The great opportunity. To me, there are relatively few great opportunities but I am not in your seat and don't live your life. You have to decide what a great opportunity is for you that would cause you to accept less. For the person making $100,000 a year, for the person making $200,000 a year, the notion of accepting a few dollars less for the "great opportunity" may not be a big deal. For the person making $50,000 a year, it is a different story. But that person you have to weigh the alternatives and come to your decision about whether it's worth your while.

2. If you been out of work for a long time. For you, you have a job right now and you don't have a career. You been out of work for 6, 8, 9, 12 months… Longer? Someone is making a job offer to you for less money than you earned "back when" you have a job or career right now. It's over. The fact it's that someone is willing to give you a shot after so many people have turned you down… That's a circumstance to consider it.

Understand though that often firms are negotiating.

They will talk about the individual who they've met with who is looking really strong and we are weighing the 2 of you and this person is willing to accept less. That's 1 of the classics and areas the firms dredge up. That's 1 of the classic scenarios that firms used to finesse you into accepting less money.

Frankly, I would turn around and say, "Thanks for bringing that to my attention. The fact is that if you believe this is a better person for this role, you should really choose them. If we are really equal and they are willing to accept less, you should choose them. For me, I look at it as, "I cost more but I bring greater productivity. If I haven't convinced you of that yet, talk with me about the perceived differences between us and let's address that." The fact that they are raising. This is the subject indicates that it is close. They do see a difference between the 2 of you; otherwise they would try to bring you down to that price point. After all, why bother to have this conversation. They could have just chosen the other person.

That's a factor. They are using a negotiating ploy.

Another factor that you need to take into consideration it is not about accepting $5000 or $10,000 less now, it is that accepting less money affects every dollar you ever earn for that firm and every other firm from now on, All because you accepted less money now. They build their raises based on what you are currently earning, right?

Using simple numbers, if you accept $5000 less now or are making $110,000 and accept $100,000, if you get a 5% increase, you are now at $105,000. Had you been at $110,000, the race would have been higher, right? Understand that there is an impact now and when you change jobs from a few years in the future, 2 or 3 years from now. After all, they are formulating their increases based upon what you are currently earning.

For now, in Massachusetts, that will become different next year, when a law goes into effect prohibiting employers from asking about your salary. For most organizations in most parts of the country, they are basing wage increases on current salary. They don't care that you took $10,000 less to join your current firm. They work off the current numbers because that's a fact. Understand there's an impact upon you that you will never recover from.

As you can tell, generally, I am against accepting less money. If it means so much to an organization that you accept $5000 or $10,000 less, there is a bigger problem there in terms of how your marketing yourself that you need to address.

Generally, thumbs down to the notion of accepting less except in the circumstances that I've already outlined..

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Are There Places in Every State To Help You Find a Job? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/01/24/are-there-places-in-every-state-to-help-you-find-a-job

EP 1354 What kind of places are you thinking of?  Government agencies?  Recruiters?  Nonprofit groups?’ 

Summary

The question for today is, "Are there places in every state to help you find the job?" 

It depends on what you mean by the word, "places."  After all, I'm sure there are recruiters in every state that will help you find the job.  There are people that will help you find a job.  If you mean government agencies, which is what I suspect you are asking about, yes, I'm sure there are agencies that do occupational training and, perhaps, an Office of Employment and Training that will help you find work.  It used to be called Unemployment.  These agencies will "help you find a job."  

What did they really do?  They will point you to a computer, tell you to do a search on their website and other websites to identify positions.

Do you think that's the way that's the way to help you find the job?
They may have pamphlets and other material for you to read (and probably not follow through on) that are designed to help you find the job, but are basic.

If you are the beginner level in your job search, you may need that kind of material to help you find work.

If you are a more experienced person, respectfully, , what I have seen of the information that is provided won't be good enough to help you. Certainly, they are not going to go out and "find jobs for you." Their job is to process people, not help you find the job.

Thus, the answer the question is, "it depends." For most individuals, it is very basic stuff that won't help you very much.

What you need to do take charge of your career, learn what you need to in order to find work now and in the future, and think of your career as a business that you own, not a him bdicated 2 other people.

It's kind of like investing in mutual funds – – you handle your money to other people who you think no better, but do they really? Or a financial adviser? Do you think some of them really know better?

At the end of the day, you may not get a lot out of these Office of Training facilities and other places that the government has set up. You will get some amount of advice from recruiting firms. You can find people who can help you. There are nonprofit groups that can help. But you need to be in charge of your career,

I created JobSearchCoachingHQ.com to help both beginning and experienced professionals access to great information to help you find work. Also, you can ask me questions while you're a member of the site and answer them to help you find work.

Again visit the site. – – JobSearchCoachingHQ.com

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Should I Quit LinkedIn? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/02/04/should-i-quit-linkedin-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1365 I have a large network on LinkedIn but no one will help me. Should I quit LinkedIn?

Summary

The scenario that someone posed for me is, "I have a large network on LinkedIn, but my connections will do nothing to help me. Should I quit LinkedIn?"

Should this person quit LinkedIn? Hmmm.

No.

If you are like most people, you have collected connections as though you're making a pasta necklace . . You have been fighting macaroni to put on the necklace. You have no relationship with him whatsoever; you built up your numbers and they don't know you at all. You have done nothing to develop the relationship. Why should they help you? After all, have you help them? You don't know anything about them and they don't know anything about you.

The issue is that you have done nothing to connect with them as a human being beyond simply their being a number on your LinkedIn tally. Let me use myself as an example.

Jeff Altman. The Big Game Hunter. A headhunter, now coach, with a very noticeable brand. The Big Game Hunter. People reaching out to me all the time and 4 years, I would receive 20 or 30 connection request daily from people. I wasn't trying. People were reaching out to me because they like the brand. I wasn't accepting requests from everyone because I wasn't accepting them from people who are overseas (and I still don't accept them from overseas or from third-party recruiters).

The result when the being that I picked up numbers very quickly. Once they connected with me, I never heard from them again even though I sent them a request for a resume if they were looking for a job, even though I gave them a free subscription to an e-zine I published so that they can learn about job search. Nothing. Not a word. I suspect the same is true of you, too. It's kind of like on Facebook where you suddenly have friends because you collaborated with them on one of the games, suddenly you have a connection with them? What do you know about them that suddenly you are a "friend" with them on Facebook?

The same thing happens on LinkedIn. Unless you have developed a relationship with someone, they are not going to help you at all. Why should they?

I want to encourage you to (1) not just simply build your network numbers or connection numbers, but your relationship numbers. Reach out to them and see how you can help them in some way. Do things that will make you more prominent. For example, right before the publishing/blog platform. Do things like that in order to get noticed. Engaging groups for heaven sake! There are places on LinkedIn. We can make yourself more prominent for the work that you do.

You don't have to be THE subject matter expert. You can develop a reputation. For example, someone I am coaching now is a security professional is writing for the platform and releasing provocative material and, as he said to me yesterday, he is getting a lot of notice, not just simply by the numbers of people who are reading his articles, but based upon the number of contacts that are coming to him now in one way or another.

I'm going to put it back on you. You have to develop a relationship with people where they know, like and trust you. That is not going to happen overnight. You're going to have to work at this but judging by where you are in your career, you are relatively inexperienced and, thus, at this sense of entitlement that people should be helping you just because you are connected with them.

It doesn't work that way.

Start building relationships and start making it a network. Right now, it is not a network.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Should I Call Recruiters Directly to Find Me a Job or Wait for Them to Call Me? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/12/18/should-i-call-recruiters-directly-to-find-me-a-job-or-wait-for-them-to-call-me

EP 1319 Should I call up recruiters directly to ask them to find me a job, or wait for them to call me?

Summary

The question for today is, "Should I call up recruiters directly to ask them to find me a job or wait for them to call me?"

I'm not sure what you think recruiters do...When you are calling them up, are you paying them anything for this? And you expect them to "find you a job?" Seriously, when you say, "find you a job," you have the equation all wrong.

The equation for a recruiter, headhunter, any professional that is in the employment business is they are there to fill jobs and get paid for their efforts. They are not there to "find you a job" except coincidentally in that process. So, in terms of waiting for them to call you, (1) See if you can identify people who work in your field. Seriously. Don't just call recruiters up at random; see if you can find people who work in your field.

(1a) See if they have any jobs open that fit your background. They are not there to find the job for you. They are there to fill a job with you or someone like you. I say it that way because if you act like a jerk, There is someone there who is not going to act like a jerk who they are going to work with To fill this position with because they don't want to get embarrassed in front of their client. That's because the client is going to stop calling them If there are too many people that they refer who act stupid.

So, you always want to be in the position where recruiters are contacting you. That's because it is clear that they have a role open that might fit you. You can always look at job ads on job boards for local newspapers, websites and a whole host of other places to find individual recruiters who have positions open that fit your background. Again, I want to be clear – – "that fit your background." Don't spam your resume and send it like so much garbage. They don't have time for this. If you do that you are Being like the people who spam them with Viagra ads that landed in their inbox all the time. It is just a colossal waste of time! To call them up and simply say, "Hey! I'm looking for a job,," It is no different than spam.

However, I don't want you to be passive. If you are in a professional field, what I want you to do Is have a quality LinkedIn profile that is keyword optimized So that you attract recruiters who have positions open for someone like you. You want to have your resume on a job born because that can ask you pretty wide net to people who are looking for people like you. You want to have your resume on Indeed, SimplyHired and Other sites in order to draw people to you who have positions open AND you want to be setting up search agents on different job boards so that they notify you When positions get listed. You want to be out there networking.

If you're not in a professional field, networking can take a different form. For example, if you are a recent grad you can go on LinkedIn, go across the ribbon on the top and see alumni from your school who may be a year or 2 ahead of you and you network with them. In blue-collar work, you can network with people you have worked with previouslyAnd see if they know about a position.

However, to call up a recruiter out of the blue To find a job for you? You are just kidding yourself.

Also say that you need my help. If you think this is the way it works, I want to encourage you to join JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. I have curated information that will help you find work, PLUS You can ask me questions that will help streamline your process and make your search go faster.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

JobSearchTV.com

What to Do If No One Is Getting Back To You | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

I was coaching someone yesterday who was invited for an interview but the company wasn’t getting back to him to schedule the appointment. What do I do to get them to talk to me?

Summary

I was coaching someone yesterday who pose this situation to me and was looking for advice about how to handle it. You see, he'd been contacted by a corporate recruiter to schedule an interview for him with her. The scenario was one, "please give me a couple of dates and times for your availability." He responded quickly and then . . . nothing. First, he offered Wednesday which was (I think it was Monday they got the email). He offered Wednesday and Friday.

Wednesday came and went. Nothing. Friday comes and goes. Nothing. He reaches out on LinkedIn. The connection request is accepted almost immediately. He knows the recruiter's around but she's not responding. He messages her again. Nothing.

We all know that this does not have a happy ending. However, in my mind, what I'm thinking is that from the time of the invitation, there's a final interview going on. And I'm thinking to myself, you know, she made a mistake in inviting him. But there's a final going on and they're waiting for the results. He is a backup person.

However, the question is, no one's getting back to me. How do I find out what's going on? How do I flush up the situation? Now, I've used I use this a million times when I worked in recruiting. And again, just to remind you, I now coach people. So, I look at scenarios and offer suggestions for how to resolve them. In this particular case, here is the resolution. Here is the idea that I have.

Send an email to them and the subject line would say, "Are you okay?"

The body of the email would have the original invitation for the interview, but then it would start off by saying, "you know, I received this invitation from you." Then, there's the invite for the interview.

Then, it continues below to say, "and I responded to schedule an appointment and, so far, I haven't heard anything back from you. It's almost two weeks (and here's the here's the final piece, ready). Are you okay?"

You're not asking about the interview. You're just asking if the person's okay. This works because it's kind of embarrassing to have someone concerned about you and you're not responding. So, now, that you sense that they're worried, you feel compelled to say, "No, no, I'm okay." Then, they offer the explanation for what's going on.

That's what happened. 15 minutes after he sends the email to the recruiter. he gets a message from him saying, " You are a genius. It worked like a charm." It was exactly what you thought. There was a final interview going on. And I don't understand why she invited him onto the calendar. she had to have scheduled this interview.

So, I'll simply say that, when push comes to shove, if you're not getting calls back from corporate recruiters and a while has going by and you're not getting a call from an agency recruiter, the message that says, "are you okay," and just summarizing what's happened. I'll give a typical example.

You called me about this role. I haven't heard anything back from You. I've called a couple of times. I've emailed a few times. "Are you okay," usually will get someone to surface because they don't want someone to think that there's something wrong with them.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice

Jeff Altman - , The Big Game Hunter - Job Hunting Coach - Job Search Coach
Jeff Altman – , The Big Game Hunter – Job Hunting Coach – Job Search Coach

Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

A Question About Discrimination | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/08/a-question-about-discrimination-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1280 When hiring, are you allowed to deny people on a bad personality?

Summary

"When hiring, are you allowed to deny people on the bad personality where, if they don't embody the company image, even if they meet the paper requirements."
I want to break this question down into a couple of different components.  The basis of the rejection is your personality, not whether you have the skill… The company image… I'm confused about that but I will try to sort through as I talk.

Discrimination exists, under US law, based upon a number of criteria.  Some states have added additional criteria onto the initial federal wants.  As long as the form of discrimination. Any of those laws, it is not, by definition, discrimination.  It may be discriminatory. It may reflect ignorance, but it is not legally discrimination.

In this example, a person meets the paper requirements and we don't know whether this person displayed their knowledge poorly on the interview.  We are just going to look at what we know here.  This person believes that they were turned down based upon personality and a 2nd criteria.

Personality is not a discriminatory category under any criteria I've ever heard of.  Firms are allowed to evaluate people for "fit" as long as that doesn't fall into a discriminatory category.  For example, we don't think you fit in because we only hire men.  Another example would be your gay and we only hire heterosexuals.  And, of course you are black and we are white or your white or black.  What do you know about our culture without actually giving them a chance to demonstrate that in the course of the interview?  That would be clear discrimination based upon it. Personality… No.

Company Image?
I had a question based upon the phrase, "the company image."  They don't embody "the company image."  I'm wondering whether this is a question about weight and whether this person might be profoundly obese, for example.  In certain states, that behavior might qualify as discrimination.

Ultimately, you have to prove that was the criteria for being rejected by this organization.  That is a hard road to take.  In terms of weight, to my knowledge, an attorney would know this better, you can't use the excuse of, "No one at this firm is morbidly obese."  That's a term that I've heard used, to describe someone who was extremely overweight.  They are at the point of risking death by being that overweight.

Again, if you really believe that this is the case, consult an attorney and see what they have to say.  Find out what it would take to prove your case if the issue is about you being extremely overweight.  See if that would allow you to become a part of a "protected class" under state or federal law.  If you live in a bigger city, you might be protected under local law, as well, because those laws are added on top of the original federal law.

I'm sorry to be more specific, but I think this becomes a way to evaluate whether this is a case of discrimination and whether firms can do it.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.