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No BS Hiring Advice

Stop Screwing People | No BS Hiring Advice


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter delivers tough love about a situation that happens much too often.

Summary

I've always been a big believer that everyone in an organization has to get on the same page immediately about what they're looking for when they're hiring. That's all the people in the department when they're trying to interview, what's communicated to HR, the job requirement. Everyone has to be on board. Let me just tell you about something that happened to me this week (NOTE: I no longer do recruiting)
I was contacted by a firm to fill four positions. Great! I love this! Two obscure technologies. Okay, I do this all the time. I love working on obscure technologies. So, I find four people for the jobs to start off. I knew one wasn't right and it was a test that scenario and then, I told them that, and they respond back say, " this person isn't right for that reason, " They'll find I had assessed the properly. I should replace that person with another. So, I now have four people for four jobs. All, I'm looking for at this point is constructive feedback.
They talk to one person. "This person is terrific. I want to get him back to meet and to talk to so-and-so person who was overseas on a trip.” Couldn't do it. They tried to sell substitute someone else in the interview process. That person wound up not making themselves available. It's now a week later for this person for this person they were excited about. I emailed the HR person. I reached her yesterday. This is what I hear. They are rethinking the jobs and what they really need.
Okay. This is from beginning to end, this is 10 days, by the way. 10 days and they are re-thinking it. Why wasn’t it thought through the beginning? Why wasn't everyone on board with what was being looked for at the beginning? Now, this is one of the things that makes me, as a recruiter nuts is, on your side, when you do things that are helter-skelter and you lurch this way and then you go, "stop," and I'm expected to be happy about this because I've invested time and effort and resources (which is money, by the way), into working on something and then you're going, "Stop!"
All I want is a clear picture of what you're looking for. Now. I've got to imagine this from the job hunter's perspective. "We love him. We love him. We got to talk to him! We've got to talk to him. Oh, he's terrific! This guy's going to wrap up so quickly," and then it's a week later from when the substitute interviewer couldn't make themselves available.
So, just recognize the impact that your behavior on everyone in this process. Now, you can rationalize this away till you're blue in the face. There's no excuse for It. If I went to you and said and handed you a resume of someone that you thought was perfect and then I can't produce them, you'd be angry at me, right? And rightly, so. I wouldn't have done my job properly. Well, the fact is you haven't done your job properly.

So, I just want to encourage you, before you give out requirements, before you start interviewing, get on the same page. This isn't about changing your mind midstream. In this example, it's 10 days in. This could have been all solved before hand instead of wasting people's time. Don't waste time. Don't waste others time. You're screwing them

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

How to Get on a Recruiter’s Radar | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/07/24/how-to-get-on-a-recruiters-radar-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1175 On this show on this show, I discuss how to get on a recruiter’s radar.

Summary

So you've seen an ad and it's a roadmap for what they're looking for. Take a look at your resume and ask yourself, "How does that really match up? Does it match up? Do I have the experience, but my resume doesn't really express it well? I need to fix the resume." That's going to be the benchmark by which they go. You can also get on their radar by . . . There are going to be times where they are going to contact you and say, "Hey, I'm doing this with our client. Do you know someone?" and being supportive of them. If they get abusive, and one particular recruiter calls you every day four times a day for referrals, you just tell them, "This is getting to be a little too much. I'm willing to help but I'm not stupid. I've got a job to do. It is not putting money in your pocket. I'm willing to help but why don't you send an email with this information?

Now the true recruiter model,they are out there hunting for you. They're trying to find you. If you're working with at a level where they're going to be dealing with a contingency firm or an executive firm, that really doesn't matter. Part of it is you want them to find you. And there's a number of easy ways to do it.

Number one is you start being in situations where there it is publicity about you. So, for example, you've written a book, you have an article, there are a number of articles that you've written, a number of books. The firm that you are going to wind up looking for someone like that because they represent being an expert. In another instance. Let's say, you are not at that higher level where you're an author and publishing deal with a major publisher. Another thing you can do you speak at conferences. You know, you can be part of a program for a trade group where you are presenting on a subject. It doesn't have to be the most sophisticated presentation but understand they'll find you through Google.

Another way is your LinkedIn profile. There are recruiters who operate at that level who are looking through LinkedIn and you need to demonstrate a keyword rich LinkedIn profile where they are finding you based on your experiences. They are seeing things in the profile such as articles that you've written for LinkedIn, connections to podcasts where you have been interviewed or perhaps PowerPoints on SlideShare that help firms recognize and help recruiters recognize I should say that you're not the average individual. By doing these powerpoints and putting them up on SlideShare and connecting them to your LinkedIn profile, it's a great way to stand out from the pack and and demonstrate that you are an expert.

Have a Web site where you have your resume. Have a blog on that Web site where you talk about, not your family but professional matters. These were all great ways for discovery to occur because, understand a real headhunter is help, they are trying to find you and they are looking looking for people in ways, did not trying to find you on LinkedIn most of the time.
They may use LinkedIn to correlate, but they are using Google to try to find people who will impress their clients, just by the fact that there is PR about them they presented . . . a whole host of things along these lines.

So I want you to think of your career as a business and, in doing so, when you look at what businesses do to be discovered, you know, it's not just the advertising that they do because there are a lot of places that don't advertise that you go to, right?

Just because you've seen them in the neighborhood that you're buying. After all, the first time shopped on Amazon you never heard of them before. You had no idea what to expect. You went to Amazon, had a great experience. Again, you went to Amazon to be discovered and put yourself in the position to be discovered. That will go a long way toward being discovered by third party recruiters.

And again, if you're working with the agency level with someone who only response so resumes that are sent to them, remember your resume just has to demonstrate the fit and then they will be happy to help.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Make The Changes the Recruiter Asks for | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to make quality changes to your resume when you were asked to make them.

Summary

Hi! I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter and let's talk about working with recruiters again.

You sent the resume to a recruiter and had a phone interview. They made a suggestion for you to tweak your resume in a particular way. You send back a resume where you've changed 2 words. Why did you do that? The recruiter is tell you exactly what he or she needs there telling you that, not to waste your time, but because the client is communicated exactly what they need to say. Let me give you an example.

I was doing a search for client for a C level position with the firm. They have changed directions on what they are looking for and now want someone who is come up through the technology ranks, can still do some technology work, but has managed resources for a firm of the particular size. They are clear now about what they want. I can handle that they change directions. I'm not happy that waste a bunch of time up until this point but I can deal with it. I got back to 1 of the candidates I represented and told them that I thought they change directions in a way that suits you better. "I am looking at your resume and needs a few tweaks. Can you get back to me later today or tomorrow?" He said back a resume with one sentence changed and addressed none of the concerns about size and scope of the firms that he had worked for, did make clear is technology expertise currently… He wasted everyone's time.

Don't be a fool. Do what you are being coached to do as long is it is not a lie. . I want to be clear about this. Do what you are being coached to do as long as it is not a lie. I don't believe in lying. I know you don't as well. When lies occur, BUT the recruiter is telling you something when they are asking you through revision to your resume. If you tell them, "You can make the change," know they can't. They can change a few words. You know the depth of your skill far better than they. Put in the resume when they ask for it. It takes 5 to 10 minutes for you and an hour for them because they don't know you. Then, they're going to send it back to you for approval and you're going to say it is not exactly right. Save everyone some time and changed a few words to make it different and correct.

This is Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter and if you are watching on YouTube, share it, leave a comment, click the like button… Just do something that lets people know that it was worthwhile. Then, go over to www.thebiggamehunter.us. There's a lot more content there that you can watch, listen to or read that will help you find work more quickly. Then, you can also search positions. I am still recruiting for (since recording this, I am no longer recruiter; I am a career coach, coaching people into their new roles).

Finally, if we are not connected on LinkedIn, send the connection request to me at www.linkedin.com/in/thebiggamehunter. I accept connection requests worldwide, except if you look like a spammer or a scammer.

This is Jeff Altman. I hope you have a great day. Take care!

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

JobSearchTV.com

What Does It Mean If A Recruiter Asks, “Are You Available?” | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

There are many layers to answering this question that I cover my answer.

Summary

I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. I'm the head coach forJobSearchCoachingHQ.com. He is a great question I received from someone. "What does it mean if a recruiter asks 'Are you available?'"

There are 2 dimensions to this. One is if you are a full-time person and they are trying to fill a full-time position.The 2nd this if you are a contractor. So,I think the 1st thing you have to clarify is, "Are you asking me if I'm open to another full time position? A contract? What kind of thing is this?" From there, you can act accordingly.

Basically what the trying to do is find out if you are open to something else now. You are working. They have seen your LinkedIn profile. Whatever. They have gone back into their database and they have reached out to you.They are trying to find out if you're open to something else right now.

If you are contractor, there is a nuance to this because, as you know,They are trying to find out if you are available for this assignment NOW! Not 2 months from now. Not 2 years from now. NOW! they may have assignment open that they need to fill the next 2 weeks They want to know . if you can interview for the assignment. Fundamentally, what the trying to find out is if you are someone that they could talk to about the assignment and could fill it now.

Full time is different. Companies have a multi-interview process and all the recruiter is trying to find out Is whether you are open to something else. That's why you have to ask the clarifying question.

With contractors, it's yes or no. It's really that simple. In full-time jobs, they don't really mean right now. They really mean are you open to something else.

I hope you found this helpful. Again, I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. If you are interested my coaching you one-on-one, critiquing your resume and/or LinkedIn profile, preparing you for an interview or a salary negotiation, Go to my website www.TheBigGameHunter.us..On the top, you will find relevant camps for the service you are looking for. Purchase it. Schedule time.I would love to help you.

And

I'll be back soon with more. Have a great day.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

How Can I Tell a Recruiter “No” When They Ask for References? | JobSearchTV.com


Here answer the question from someone who is asked for references by recruiter during the 1st interview and doesn’t want to provide them.

Summary

I was asked the question I thought was great, "A recruiter has asked me for references at the time of the 1st interview. I don't really want to give it to them. How can I say no to a recruiter if they asked me for references during an interview?"

I want to start off by differentiating and start by answering the question about a contingency recruiters. That's definitely a place to say no. They may tell you that they want to check references on behalf of their clients. That's a great line. But what they are really doing is trying to use your contacts to recruit other people. I know this because I listen to sales trainers for years talk about this is a great gambit to get talent and you don't want to be complicit.

The easiest way to respond is to smile and say, "In due time but not right now."

If you respond by saying, "We need to have it because the client wants us to check references at the time that we submit a cabinet," (I want to be clear, not talking about retained search firm's or C suite professionals) I am answering in this way for the Average Jane or Joe who is approached by a recruiter and is being told that the client wants it.

"Great! I'll be happy to provide my references to the client."

"They want us to check the references."

"Not at this time."

"Then we can submit you."

"OK."

Leave it at that. You know why? It's because if they can get you in the door they'll get you in the door.

And they can't. What they're trying to do is parlay one contact into 2 or 3 were they call them up and trying to recruit them, extensively under the guise of checking a reference.

So, they might say, "We need a former manager, it was start by contacting your manager in doing a reference check and then flip it in an effort to get recruiting business from them.

Or they may try to talk to a peer reviewers and then say, "Say! This is a position I am trying to recruit for. Is this something that might interest you? There are a lot of little gambits that go on with third-party recruiters.

I know there are a lot of people who might respond by saying, "Would you do that with a company?"

"NO!" Unfortunately, too many third-party recruiters or sleazy. We know this already. The idea is to push them off because you don't know if you can trust them yet (wink wink. Probably you can trust many of them anyway. There are exceptions, but most of them you probably can't.) And it's kind of like being on a 1st date with someone.

"Can I get a reference from your former husband or wife, please. I would like to get a reference from them. Maybe someone else you went out with previously because I want to know what you are liked by talking to them."

No, not on a 1st date, especially with an absolute stranger. Obviously, you would never do that in a dating situation! Here, I want you to do this very casually and with a big smile on your face, say, "In due time , we'll get that."

"But the client wants it!"

"If you can't present me with out that, obviously you don't think I am a fit. So let's leave it at that and just move on."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes  

How to Work Contingency Recruiters | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2011) NOTE: if I mentioned any jobs later in the show were filled the years ago. PLUS I no longer do recruiting. I’m an executive job search and business life coach.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

What to Do When The Recruiter Calls | Job Search Radio


With all the effort recruiters make to find someone using LinkedIn, Facebook, social media, the web and other tools, you can expect to receive calls at your office from recruiters reaching out to you and trying to engage with you.

Frank Risalvato and I talk about what to do when the recruiter calls.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Why Do Recruiters Ask How The Interview Went? (VIDEO)


Here I answer a question from someone who wants to know why recruiters ask how the interview went after someone meets 1 of their clients.

Summary

This question is, "Why do recruiters ask how the interview went?"

We like to debrief the candidate about how their experience was. , There are a number of reasons why this happens, ranging from the innocuous (recruiters really want to know how it went.) to more manipulative reasons. There are other terms for it, but they're not coming to mind right now.

1. We want to know if you've learned something about the job that might be useful to us we have interviewing. After all, sometimes employers don't communicate changes to a job description. They just contact number of recruiters and although they may be talking to the recruiters with some regularity, they may forget to tell the recruiter that they change their thinking about some aspect of the job.

That's one thing, "So how do they explain the position to you," might be 1 of the follow-up questions.

The sequence of questions might go, "How did the interview go?"

"Uh-huh."

"And what sort of things that they ask you about?" There, a recruiters trying to find out the questions you might've been asked.

"How do they explain the position to you?" If the role, sometimes the job description is missing some significant pieces to it that indicate is tantalizing or maybe defective about the job. "Why would anyone want to do this?"

There are a lot of reasons why recruiters would ask that question, including the basic but now one that says, "I want to know if I have a chance of earning a fee with you."

I also want to know whether I should call the client because if you say, "Oh! It was terrible. They just beat me to a pulp." Why would I want to put my head in the noose and putting myself in the position of calling my client and going, "Hi! How to go?" Then I would discover it was bad and get link to your bad performance. The recruiter would remember that I was the person who referred you and then be harder to get more interviews.

The reasons why are primarily to gain information but is also to find out whether or not you might do a placement, whether you are the one who might be hired and whether the recruiter might earn a commission.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com and then forward your question to the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Do I Reach Out to a Recruiter Who Reached Out to Me A Year Ago? | JobSearchTV.com


A recruiter reached out to me a year ago about a position but I wasn’t interested. Now, I decided to look for a job. How do I reach out to them? Is there any etiquette about doing that?

Summary

I received a question from someone that I thought was interesting.The question is, "How can I reach out to a recruiter who contacted me a year ago? Is there an etiquette to keep in mind?"

Hopefully you kept etiquette in mind when you rebuffed the outreach from them. Hopefully you weren't rude, obnoxious, or cause them to question their sanity and ever reaching out to you. Believe it or not, some people act like jerks. That's true of recruiters, obviously, but job hunters do it in spades to say the least.

if you are courteous when they reached out to you and said something along the lines of, "Thank you for reaching out. That wasn't my time to consider other things. It now is." The more drawn out way to do it that I think would work best is, "A year ago you reached out to me about a search that you were doing. I wasn't ready to make a change. Now I am. I would like to schedule time with you. Would you like to see my resume 1st?"

With an executive search firm, with the retained search recruiters, unless they have a position open for what your background would be a fit, you probably won't hear from them.. With a contingency recruiting firm, that's usually the case, as well, but you may get a phone call from them just to clarify your background now. Regardless, there is no harm to reaching out as long as you're well mannered and present yourself decently.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. Will

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchTV.com

Will a Recruiter Give Up on Someone If They Are Turned Down Too Often | JobSearchTV.com


The answer to this question shouldn’t surprise you. But if it does, this is a message that you need to learn.

Summary

Will a recruiter give up on a job applicant or a candidate If they are turned down for jobs too often?

HELL YEAH!

If you're asking the question, my assumption is you are working with contingency recruiters who aren't going to be paid unless you are hired for a position they refer you to With the result being they have already invested/wasted a lot of time trying to help you get interviews at clients of theirs and you are turning up empty. How many companies do you think they have in their hip pocket that will want to talk with you given the skills that you have?

There are a finite number of firms that want to hire someone with a particular background. I don't care if you are a kid freshly out of school, you are someone with 2 years of experience or have 22 or 42 years of experience. There are only a finite number of firms in your market area that are going to care. Your lack of performance is on you, not on them. After all, they have gotten you interviews and you are not delivering the goods.

Either you have lied to them about your capabilities OR you just don't know how to interview. . Ultimately, these are skills issues that you can improve upon. But you asked whether recruiter would give up on someone . . . Of course they would. You are a waste of time. You are costing them money. Every time they send you out and you fail to deliver, you are costing them a fee.

If you are staff person at this agency (And the statistical probability suggests that the person you are dealing with is a staff person), They are receiving a percentage of that fee that the agency gets. They are hustling. They are working for you and you are failing.

Get better. Stop wasting time and worrying if a recruiter will give up and start worrying about delivering a better performance under interviews.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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