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Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Learning The Single Best Question to Ask on An Interview | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff discusses another interviewing mistake people make–not learning the single best question to ask on an interview and when to ask it.

Summary

I'm back with another 1 of those stupid interview that job hunters make almost every time.I have spent a lot of years talking about the single best question to ask on any interview and when to ask it. And many of you haven't learned it. You haven't spent the time practicing. . You never deliver it even if you know it.

This is a technique that works very well on phone interviews and on in person interviews. Yet again, I want to walk you through it so that you have an idea.

Let's say it is an in person interview. You have been escorted into the person's office. As the 2 of you lower your butts into the chair, rather than wait for them to start the conversation, I want you to start it. The way you start it is by saying, "I want to thank you so much for making the time to speak with me today. I spoke with (then he mentioned the name of the recruiter who referred you or you spoke with HR during a telephone screen or you saw their ad) and it gave me a thumbnail on what you are looking for But I want to get your take on the role. Would you tell me about the job as you see it and what I can do to help?"

You asked this question at the beginning of the interview, before anything has happened so that you get their current thinking about the job. I want to understand that when employers approve the job description and posted on the web were give it out to recruiters, by the time you see it, mentally, they may have tweaked the job description but done nothing to change It online, with recruiters or anywhere else. So you want to make sure that you are operating with the correct knowledge of what they are looking for. Thus, you want to ask that question as soon as you lower your seat in the chair.

Now, if it is a phone call,, again , you asked the same question. "I saw your profile on LinkedIn and want to have a chance to speak with you. Is this a good time to speak?"

"Yes, it's a great time. But before we start, I want to ask you a question. Could you tell me about the role that you have in mind and what you want me to do to help you?"

Again, the idea is to find out at the beginning of the interview what they're thinking is so that You can talk about what you've done that relates to what matters to them, instead of talking about what you've done... which may just overwhelm them.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Stupid Interview Mistakes as Reported by Forbes |No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/01/21/stupid-interview-mistakes-as-reported-by-forbes-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

Ep 630 These are pretty dumb mistakes!

Summary

I stumbled into this article from Forbes that I thought was hysterical that talked about a number of mistakes job hunters make. I'm using these examples from them. Give full credit tp Forbes. They are very funny.

1. A job applicant hugged the president of the company. It's like you're having a good moment in the interview and you give him a hug.

2. Another one said they didn't like to get up early and didn't like to read. Huh? Help me understand how that one was supposed to get you a job.

3. Someone said he had to quit a banking position because he was always tempted to steal. Unbelievable!

4. A candidate emptied the employer's candy dish into her pocket.

5. Someone called in sick to her current employer while on the interview, faking her illness. What people do sometimes!

6. Someone said that they would do whatever it takes to do the job, legal or not.

7. Someone called their wife during the interview to see what they will be having for dinner. You're in an interview, you pick up the phone and find out what's for dinner.

8. Someone said he wouldn't want the job if he had to work a lot.

9. Someone asked if they could postpone the start date so she can still get holiday gifts from vendors in her current job. Couldn't you have said this 1 more discreetly?

10. Someone would not answer a question, they were asked because he thought they would steal his idea and not hire him.

11. Some of the night having a cell phone with them even though it could be heard ringing in their briefcase.

12. A person asked to be paid under the table.

13. The candidate reached over and put their hand on the interviewer's knees. The obvious offensive behavior is a man doing it to a woman that I know of too many instances where a woman does it to a man. The more egregious one is a man reaching out to a woman.

Folks, be smart. There is a lot to learn about interviewing. As a job hunter, most of you act as amateurs.

When push comes to shove, learn more about job hunting. Don't go to interviews and conduct yourself like a rank beginner. The way to do it is to learn more about interviewing. You can do that at a site like JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and practice. Practice your answers to questions, get feedback from someone else… I want to be clear, when I say practice, the words have to come out of your mouth. You can't just think the answer, like so many people do.

Without the words coming out of your mouth as you present them to a potential employer, you are not really learning anything. It's like going to a Toastmasters meeting and watching other speakers and thinking that's enough to become a great speaker. Or watching candidates give a speech at a convention and thinking that you can run for president. There is more than being a voyageur. You have to actually do it in order to in order to be effective.

I say that because the skills needed to find a job are different than those needed to do a job. If you are just watching and not practicing, you're going to make dumb mistakes like the ones I've mentioned from Forbes.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

You Never Know Who Makes a Difference in Your Interviews | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/10/27/you-never-know-who-makes-a-difference-in-your-interviews

EP 908 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter shares a few stories to explain why you should treat everyone like young royalty who you meet on an interview. 

Summary

Every once in a while, I speak with someone from a networking group or social services agency that provides advice and coaching for job hunters. I had a conversation with someone from an agency that provides four-week job coaching in job training services. There really the story to me that you thought was real important for me to share with you.

They sent someone out for an interview who did very well, they were about to get hired. The owner of the firm comes out, is enthusiastic about the candidate and walks over to the receptionist and asks, "So, what did you think? I'm planning on hiring her!"

The receptionist told him, "Hmmmm, you really shouldn't."

"Why is that?"

The receptionist told him about how rude the candidate was. I have heard this many times before. I'm from the New York area in the classic story from days of old on Wall Street was bad the bigwigs at the investment banks would ask the man who shining their shoes it would ask him for advice about someone they had met. They want to know how he had been treated recently by this person because they want to hire people who are not only capable but considerate and a little bit humble. I know that may be a little hard to imagine a lost these days, but this is to happen and is the point of the story.

You never know who is involved with the hiring decision. You never know whether the person in the reception area is going to be offended by remark you made, by the disregard for them as a human being, are you treating them as though you are more important and mightier than them.

Keep your "attitude" to yourself. Yes, you are focused on delivering a great interview, but everyone, EVERYONE is a part of the process

I remember one client am I would find people in for interviews. Invariably, they would asked the driver who would pick people up at the airport for his input (yes, he was generally a "him" who was the driver). They would ask him for his input about how he was treated by them. Or they rude or discourteous to him. Whether they spoke to him in the car or completely disregarded them as being a nonentity.

You never know. You just never know who is going to be involved in that decision. Treat every last 1 of them as though they were Prince George of England, small royalty who seem so important to everyone.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Stupid Interview Mistakes as Reported by Forbes | JobSearchTV.com


These are pretty dumb.

Summary

I stumbled into this article from Forbes that I thought was hysterical that talked about a number of mistakes job hunters make. I'm using these examples from them. Give full credit tp Forbes. They are very funny.

1. A job applicant hugged the president of the company. It's like you're having a good moment in the interview and you give him a hug.

2. Another one said they didn't like to get up early and didn't like to read. Huh? Help me understand how that one was supposed to get you a job.

3. Someone said he had to quit a banking position because he was always tempted to steal. Unbelievable!

4. A candidate emptied the employer's candy dish into her pocket.

5. Someone called in sick to her current employer while on the interview, faking her illness. What people do sometimes!

6. Someone said that they would do whatever it takes to do the job, legal or not.

7. Someone called their wife during the interview to see what they will be having for dinner. You're in an interview, you pick up the phone and find out what's for dinner.

8. Someone said he wouldn't want the job if he had to work a lot.

9. Someone asked if they could postpone the start date so she can still get holiday gifts from vendors in her current job. Couldn't you have said this 1 more discreetly?

10. Someone would not answer a question, they were asked because he thought they would steal his idea and not hire him.

11. Some of the night having a cell phone with them even though it could be heard ringing in their briefcase.

12. A person asked to be paid under the table.

13. The candidate reached over and put their hand on the interviewer's knees. The obvious offensive behavior is a man doing it to a woman that I know of too many instances where a woman does it to a man. The more egregious one is a man reaching out to a woman.

Folks, be smart. There is a lot to learn about interviewing. As a job hunter, most of you act as amateurs.

When push comes to shove, learn more about job hunting. Don't go to interviews and conduct yourself like a rank beginner. The way to do it is to learn more about interviewing. You can do that at a site like JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and practice. Practice your answers to questions, get feedback from someone else… I want to be clear, when I say practice, the words have to come out of your mouth. You can't just think the answer, like so many people do.

Without the words coming out of your mouth as you present them to a potential employer, you are not really learning anything. It's like going to a Toastmasters meeting and watching other speakers and thinking that's enough to become a great speaker. Or watching candidates give a speech at a convention and thinking that you can run for president. There is more than being a voyageur. You have to actually do it in order to in order to be effective.

I say that because the skills needed to find a job are different than those needed to do a job. If you are just watching and not practicing, you're going to make dumb mistakes like the ones I've mentioned from Forbes.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Stupid Interview Mistakes as Reported by Forbes | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 1020 These are pretty dumb mistakes!

Summary

I stumbled into this article from Forbes that I thought was hysterical that talked about a number of mistakes job hunters make. I'm using these examples from them. Give full credit tp Forbes. They are very funny.

1. A job applicant hugged the president of the company. It's like you're having a good moment in the interview and you give him a hug.

2. Another one said they didn't like to get up early and didn't like to read. Huh? Help me understand how that one was supposed to get you a job.

3. Someone said he had to quit a banking position because he was always tempted to steal. Unbelievable!

4. A candidate emptied the employer's candy dish into her pocket.

5. Someone called in sick to her current employer while on the interview, faking her illness. What people do sometimes!

6. Someone said that they would do whatever it takes to do the job, legal or not.

7. Someone called their wife during the interview to see what they will be having for dinner. You're in an interview, you pick up the phone and find out what's for dinner.

8. Someone said he wouldn't want the job if he had to work a lot.

9. Someone asked if they could postpone the start date so she can still get holiday gifts from vendors in her current job. Couldn't you have said this 1 more discreetly?

10. Someone would not answer a question, they were asked because he thought they would steal his idea and not hire him.

11. Some of the night having a cell phone with them even though it could be heard ringing in their briefcase.

12. A person asked to be paid under the table.

13. The candidate reached over and put their hand on the interviewer's knees. The obvious offensive behavior is a man doing it to a woman that I know of too many instances where a woman does it to a man. The more egregious one is a man reaching out to a woman.

Folks, be smart. There is a lot to learn about interviewing. As a job hunter, most of you act as amateurs.

When push comes to shove, learn more about job hunting. Don't go to interviews and conduct yourself like a rank beginner. The way to do it is to learn more about interviewing. You can do that at a site like JobSearchCoachingHQ.com and practice. Practice your answers to questions, get feedback from someone else… I want to be clear, when I say practice, the words have to come out of your mouth. You can't just think the answer, like so many people do.

Without the words coming out of your mouth as you present them to a potential employer, you are not really learning anything. It's like going to a Toastmasters meeting and watching other speakers and thinking that's enough to become a great speaker. Or watching candidates give a speech at a convention and thinking that you can run for president. There is more than being a voyageur. You have to actually do it in order to in order to be effective.

I say that because the skills needed to find a job are different than those needed to do a job. If you are just watching and not practicing, you're going to make dumb mistakes like the ones I've mentioned from Forbes.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Closing | TheBigGameHunterTV


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Another 1 of those dumb mistakes that proves costly to you because you miss an opportunity.

Summary

Hi! I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. I'm the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com, a site with curated information that you watch, listen to or read that is going to help you find work more quickly.

Today, I am doing 1 of my "stupid interview mistakes" shows and is designed to talk with you about 1 of the dumb things that job hunters do time and again on interviews. This mistake is not closing. You know, you are at the end of the interview.

I talked about interviewing until I am blue in the face. If you haven't seen my material on it, go to YouTube. TheBigGameHunterTV it is my channel. Look for the playlist with interview tips and there is another one with answers to tough interview. There is 1/3 1 about brainteasers where, if you are in the financial services industry or applying to things with hedge funds, Those questions might be helpful to you.

Here, we get to the end of the interview and they asked, "So, do you have any questions for us?"I've covered a lot of the questions before and then you get to the point where you have exhausted the questions and you don't close.

What do I mean by closing?

"What's going to happen next?"It's really that simple question. "What's going to happen next?"

"Do you have any reservations about my candidacy that I can address here?"

"What will next steps look like and what sort of timeline do you have for next steps?"

Why is that important? It conveys interest.It also communicates pure level relationship instead of superior-subordinate. It is leveling the playing field. You are not giving away all of your power to the employer and deem it the right time to call. You are trying to get a sense of what will happen.

"Well, we have 37 more people to talk with.." They are telling you something with that answer that is very different than if they say, "I have 1 or 2 more people to speak with I would like to get you back next week."

What you're doing is learning from them how they see you..

"Do you see any deficiencies in my background, they give you 'cause for pause?'" They will answer that question and, from there you can go, "Oh! I'm sorry didn't address that in 1 of my earlier answers. Can I speak to that, please?"

Again, you're not giving up control the process. You are closing it In a way that allows you to appear strong and in control, just like they want to appear strong and in control.

Again, "What are the next steps?"

"Would you give me a timeline for what those next steps will be?"

"Is there anything here that is giving you reason to hesitate as to whether I can do this position So that, in this way, I'm able to address it."

Hope you found this helpful. I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. If you like me to coaching with interview preparation, critiquing your resume and/or LinkedIn profile, salary negotiation, Visit www.thebiggamehunter.us. There is a tabs on the top that speak to the services that I offer.Click the appropriate one; make payment.We'll schedule a time to speak.

I would love to help you Improve your interviewing because job hunting doesn't have to be hard, difficult, painful or take a long time. Job that they has a different skill set Then doing the job.

Hope you have a great day! Take care!

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Sounding Like a Mexican Song


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

There is a very dumb mistake that people make on interviews that I find reminds me of someone singing a Mexican song,

Summary

Here, I'm going to talk with you about 1 of those stupid interview mistakes; I use a goofy title for it but you will recognize a pretty quickly. I call it, "Sounding like a Mexican song." When they ask you a question about what you did for your firm or what you do for your firm, this is what you sound like--" I, I, I, I." All you do is talk about yourself. You don't put yourself into the context of how you work with your coworkers. You don't give people a bigger picture of where you fit in.

For example, let's say you are a staff level individual. You are answering the question like, "So, what you do for your firm?"

"I work as a team that is responsible for… The overall group does such and such. My piece of that is .. This. As such, I work with a small subset of individuals that has a budget of X number of dollars that is responsible for... blah blah blah blah." Do you get weren't coming from?

You don't say, "I do this. I do that." You don't just simply say, " I, I, I, I"

The idea is to always contextualize yourself. The people of the picture of where you fit

If you're in executive, you can say that you took over responsibility for a group that is responsible for. You can also say "I manage a slice of business that does such and such. As such, I have responsibility for a budget of $500 million. I have a staff of X number of people that is broken up by.." They you start defining your department. "I have some really talented people working for me who have really helped me look good. Obviously, I provide leadership for this group. But the fact of the matter is that I've hired some very good people and they are individuals who understand what I want and go out and deliver. My job is to really understand what is needed so I interact with people in the business unit so they feel attended to..." Again, do you get weren't coming from here

It is not just about "I I I I." It is about giving people a picture of where you fit in, which are role responsibilities are, size of the budget, size the department... It's all about giving people a sense of size and scope.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Not Treating It As Though There Is a Two Way Street (VIDEO)


This is one of the dumbest mistakes people make when they interview– not treating the interview like a two-way street.

Summary

The mistake I want to call attention to is stupid. It is not treating the interview like it is a two-way street. I understand that for a lot of you when you are young, there is the tendency to think of your potential hiring manager, your potential boss, as though they are some demi-deity looking down their nose at you, making it seem like they are superior to you. That could be furthest from the truth.

What the trying to do is evaluate and assess you. Most of them are not feeling as though they are high and powerful and all that sort of nonsense. Think of it from the standpoint that you have rights of the interview, too. You want to know what their expectations of you are, what the job is good be like, what it's like working there and need to arrive with some questions. After you answer something that they ask you about, you might just simply ask, "How does that fit into the role?" In this way, you can learn more about the job as you answer their questions.

For example, they ask you something, you answer and continue by saying, "How is that involved with the job that you are hiring me for?" They will tell you about it and it makes perfect sense. If it doesn't, you have learned something about them and that is useful to you.

Everything needs to be about you learning information about them as much as they learning about you. You need to understand what you will be stepping into in the way of a role, its responsibilities and have successful be measured. I want to come back to that one – – how success will be measured.

It's funny how often I talk to people who think success in the job is about one thing when it is about something completely different. Don't sell yourself short. Don't put yourself in the position where they are the powerful ones and you feel like a loser. Where they are up high and powerful and you feel weak and passive.

No one likes week people during dating; we want to talk to people who relate to at that doesn't involve superior-subordinate situations. The same thing is true on an interview.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Lying | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 755 It’s one thing not to remember, it’s another thing not to remember. In this video, Jeff Altman, the Big Game Hunter tries to discourage you from lying during your job search.

Summary

Some years ago on, "Saturday Night Live," Jon Lovitz played a character named Tommy Flanagan. Tommy was a guy who is a pathological liar; If you have a chance on YouTube, there are quite a few videos there. The tagline that Jon Lovitz used as the character was, "Yeah, that's the ticket. Yeah. Yeah. That's the ticket!" Every time he said that phrase, you knew he was telling a lie.

There are going to be times in your job search that you will be tempted to lie. I want to discourage you from doing it. Just try to remember this reminder. You can get away with some lines for a while but, as is the case in your personal life, lies will be exposed and found out.. The problem with that, as happened to someone I will tell you about in a minute, one day you may be met by security at your desk. They will escort you out with your possessions. That will be it. You will have to explain to people why you were fired. You will have to find another job on the heels of having been fired from lying.

Some years ago, there was a person I was representing for position at a bank who was hired, he lied as to whether or not he had a college degree. The degree was not a requirement for the position, there was no reason to lie. I had told him that this was the firm that would do a copious background check and yet he still felt compelled to lie. His first Friday of employment with this firm, he was met by security at his desk as he came back from lunch and allowed to pack up a small box of his things and was escorted out of the building.

Another instance, again, with another firm where I had warned someone about life. "This is a firm that will meticulously go through your resume to try to find inconsistencies. That 1st Friday, he was met by the head of HR who we had a frank conversation with, he confessed to the lie, again, he was escorted out the door with his possessions in a box. He was out of work like the other gentlemen for quite some time before he could land another position.

Maybe that part wouldn't be a part of your experience, but do you really want to test it?

It's one thing to be unsure of the date on your resume or the exact salary that you earned 15 years ago. It's another thing to exaggerate by $15,000 or $20,000 what your salary was a year ago. It's another thing to hide the date on the resume by extending forward or backward a date by a dramatic amount.

I'll simply say that if you are not sure about a date from a long time ago, or a salary from 10 years ago for example,Next to that date or salary, just put the expression, "approx." When asked about it, say, "I wasn't exactly sure and I didn't want you to think that I was lying to you. I would rather just reveal to you that I was not sure and put in that phrase 'approx' so that you don't have a concern about me." That solves that issue..

To go out of your way and lie, you risk putting yourself and your family into a huge bind and a firm cannot help from firing you. Why? I use an example from someone I knew some years ago who made this mistake, he was working for the securities firm. He was found out for some lie that he told. He pleaded his case with them for staying on board.

I paraphrase the language that was used. Suppose this individual had embezzled grandma's life savings And a lawyer had found out that he had lied on the application. (1) do you think the firm would've lost a court case? Of course! they kept the liar on board and it is no wonder that he embezzled grandma's life savings. If it was your grandma that was involved,, would you have wanted this person fired and the firm fined? of course! (2) I'm sure their liability insurance won't pay off if that employee is found to have life. They knew about it and then he or she committed a crime.

Just make it easy on yourself. It's one thing not to be sure; it's another thing to go out of your way and lie. Do you really want to risk losing your job after you are on board, settled in and spent all this time working to find a job only to get fired because you were stupid enough to lie.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stupid Interview Mistakes: Lying | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 755 It’s one thing not to remember, it’s another thing not to remember. In this video, Jeff Altman, the Big Game Hunter tries to discourage you from lying during your job search. 

Summary

Some years ago on, "Saturday Night Live," Jon Lovitz played a character named Tommy Flanagan. Tommy was a guy who is a pathological liar; If you have a chance on YouTube, there are quite a few videos there. The tagline that Jon Lovitz used as the character was, "Yeah, that's the ticket. Yeah. Yeah. That's the ticket!" Every time he said that phrase, you knew he was telling a lie.

There are going to be times in your job search that you will be tempted to lie. I want to discourage you from doing it. Just try to remember this reminder. You can get away with some lines for a while but, as is the case in your personal life, lies will be exposed and found out.. The problem with that, as happened to someone I will tell you about in a minute, one day you may be met by security at your desk. They will escort you out with your possessions. That will be it. You will have to explain to people why you were fired. You will have to find another job on the heels of having been fired from lying.

Some years ago, there was a person I was representing for position at a bank who was hired, he lied as to whether or not he had a college degree. The degree was not a requirement for the position, there was no reason to lie. I had told him that this was the firm that would do a copious background check and yet he still felt compelled to lie. His first Friday of employment with this firm, he was met by security at his desk as he came back from lunch and allowed to pack up a small box of his things and was escorted out of the building.

Another instance, again, with another firm where I had warned someone about life. "This is a firm that will meticulously go through your resume to try to find inconsistencies. That 1st Friday, he was met by the head of HR who we had a frank conversation with, he confessed to the lie, again, he was escorted out the door with his possessions in a box. He was out of work like the other gentlemen for quite some time before he could land another position.

Maybe that part wouldn't be a part of your experience, but do you really want to test it?

It's one thing to be unsure of the date on your resume or the exact salary that you earned 15 years ago. It's another thing to exaggerate by $15,000 or $20,000 what your salary was a year ago. It's another thing to hide the date on the resume by extending forward or backward a date by a dramatic amount.

I'll simply say that if you are not sure about a date from a long time ago, or a salary from 10 years ago for example,Next to that date or salary, just put the expression, "approx." When asked about it, say, "I wasn't exactly sure and I didn't want you to think that I was lying to you. I would rather just reveal to you that I was not sure and put in that phrase 'approx' so that you don't have a concern about me." That solves that issue..

To go out of your way and lie, you risk putting yourself and your family into a huge bind and a firm cannot help from firing you. Why? I use an example from someone I knew some years ago who made this mistake, he was working for the securities firm. He was found out for some lie that he told. He pleaded his case with them for staying on board.

I paraphrase the language that was used. Suppose this individual had embezzled grandma's life savings And a lawyer had found out that he had lied on the application. (1) do you think the firm would've lost a court case? Of course! they kept the liar on board and it is no wonder that he embezzled grandma's life savings. If it was your grandma that was involved,, would you have wanted this person fired and the firm fined? of course! (2) I'm sure their liability insurance won't pay off if that employee is found to have life. They knew about it and then he or she committed a crime.

Just make it easy on yourself. It's one thing not to be sure; it's another thing to go out of your way and lie. Do you really want to risk losing your job after you are on board, settled in and spent all this time working to find a job only to get fired because you were stupid enough to lie.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.