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No BS Hiring Advice

Avoid Discussing Salary | No BS Hiring Advice


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it is not in your firm’s interest to show your hand before extending a job offer to someone.

Summary

Today, I want to offer you some no BS hiring advice in the realm of salary negotiation with candidates. Now, as an HR professional business owner, manager, at an organization that's involved with hiring, negotiations are always one of those tricky issues. You want to get someone for the least amount of money, but you also want to make them happy. So, you don't want to necessarily squeeze them. But you also don't want to overpay because, after all, you've got a budget to contend with.
Often, hiring managers, HR professionals, you know you are you going into a negotiation with a candidate or with someone like me, a recruiter who's representing a candidate (NOTE: I no longer do recruiting) and you get to a point in the negotiation where you reveal your hand about what you're willing to pay for someone. Probably, not a good idea.
Now, let me break it into two parts. First part is with a candidate. By telling them, "the most I'm willing to pay is such and such . . . " I'm not talking about we're screening someone ithe very beginning. I'm talking about at the pre-offer phase when you're really in the negotiation phase about salary . . . what you've done is basically tell them this is the max I'm willing to pay and, if you offer them five cents less, they are going to go, "What happened? You said you'd pay to such and such but you came in less." It impacts your ability to make them happy, make it attractive for them to join . . .What have you.
You're better off in those kind of situations offering a little bit less than what you're prepared to offer. So, in this way, if you come in higher than that, they get a little bit more enthusiastic. One of my clients has that built into their offer scenario where they talk about less. If they get the person for less, great! But, at the same time, was prepared to go a few dollars higher. They are able to show, time and again, that this is a tactic that, for them, saves some money and, if necessary, they are already slotted for more so there's no sweat.
The second part of this is in talking with recruiters like I was, I worked very closely with my clients. I don't play games. Some recruiters play games and, you know, the issue comes down to you're about to make an offer to someone. They will know how much are you going to offer? How much are you going to offer?
What they're trying to do is close the candidate for you and that sounds great . . . but if you tell them, "well, I can go up to (I will pick a number of random) $10 and you offer them $7.50, or, let me be clear about that, you're prepared to go to 10, but initially you want them to to offer them $8, so, if they say yes to $8, great!
If you need to, you'll go to $10, you tell that to a recruiter, they're not going to try to hard because they know they've got the 10 locked up and their fee is contingent upon how much you want to pay. And, I'll simply say that, especially for contingency recruiting firms, you know, it's better not to let them in on the numbers. The executive search which I try to do with many of my clients even though, often, I operate on a contingency basis, I'm working for my institutional customer.
Yes, I have to deliver a candidate to you but, you know, at the same time, I'm trying to be fair. I want to have that strong relationship with you and I don't play games. So, if you tell me you're prepared to go to $10 but you'd like me to offer $8, I'm going to do that. I'm going to work toward closing it. I've done that many many times. But ,you know, for most recruiters, you can hold back that extra information because, otherwise, there's no financial incentive for them, particularly in the contingency world.
So, better to hold back. Don't always be so revealing about the numbers you're prepared to pay. Make the recruiter work that much harder in order to close the sale. It saves your organization money.
Hey, it's not your effort that's going into this.It is the recruiter's and, if you burn out one, there's gonna be another one who's gonna replace them. And, frankly, if they're doing deals with you, they're going to keep working. So like I said, hold back on what the numbers are going to be so this way, you know, you're not just giving away extra money unnecessarily.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Talking to a Previous Employee About the Hiring Manager | JobSearchTV.com


A coaching client asked me to show him how to find someone to speak with who previously worked for the firm they are interviewing with. Here’s how.

Summary

Someone asked me for more information about how to search for someone who works at a particular company. And my idea was, because this person is interviewing four particularly organization, he should talk with former employees to get some insight into the person he's meeting with had the culture of the organization. So I want to show you how to get to the area where you do that search.

So, I'm going to use a company here as an example. We’re going to use Accenture. It could be any company, and we're gonna ‘do an Accenture search. We’re going to do it in “People.” And once we’re there, we want to go to “All Filters.” And from “All Filters,” you have lots of different choices.

Now, I have a subscription where I am a paid customer, but I'm not a Sales Navigator or Recruiter function. But if you notice here, you can search by name, title. This is going to be “Current Company,” school they went to, connections. Where this is, (which is going to be in the United States), I'm not looking for current companies. I'm going over to the lower left to “Past Companies.”

Now, they happened to have a populated with Accenture, but you could put in any firm whatsoever into that area. As you can see, you could look at whether this is going to be an English-speaking profile, what industry this person might be in, the schools that they've attended, any number of criteria. But overall, the idea here is really very simple.

If you're looking for someone to speak with who previously worked at an organization, you go to the “All People” filters, Accenture, People (And I didn't put it in Accenture at that point). So again, People as bringing up everyone, I know which is currently 21000 some odd people I know, the “All Filters. “

If you're looking for someone to speak with who previously worked at an organization, you go to the “All People” filters, Accenture, People (And I didn't put it in Accenture at that point). So again, People as bringing up everyone, I know which is currently 21000 some odd people I know, the “All Filters. “ And then scroll down in the lower left, like I said, in this case, Accenture is there, but you could put any company into the area.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Make a Decision!


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages firms to either make a decision and explains why this is important.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching,  all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Finding the Firm That is Hiring | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Ep 591 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to find out the name of the company that is hiring for that job when the Recruiter drops the ball.

 

Summary

I want to help solve the puzzle that some of you have about finding a hiring firm.  There is a situation that happened to someone I knew.  It was in my coaching program and this happened to him several years ago.  He saw a listing from a recruiter, contacted the person the person did not get back to him for 3 or 4 days, even though they said they were getting them the next morning.  He called. No response.  He did it twice more, without response.  He really felt he fit the job and asked me for advice.

I said, “Here is what you do.  Sometimes, recruiters are a bit lazy so they will copy and paste job descriptions and turn them into ads.  Why don’t you do a Google search, taking some lines out of the job description and see if you can find the position.”  Sometimes, the recruiter will change a few of the words so try to start off with a broad sentence, like the 2nd or 3rd sentence, not necessarily the 1st.  You try to look at the requirements of the job and take 2 or 3 bullet points, especially if there is lengthy text. There. That entered into Google and see if it turns up something for you.

You can try the same thing with indeed but start with Google as your 1st choice.

What happened for this person is that they were able to find the position and apply for the job and the firm did not hire him!  The recruiters judgment was correct.  He wasn’t really a fit.  However, if you really believe you are and you want to do this, this is the simplest way to get in touch with the firm. See if you can find the third-party recruiter who is sufficiently lazy that all they did was copy and paste the job description and then you can find.

There’s always the advantage of working through the third-party recruiter.  And I want to be clear about this.  If you can work through the recruiter, you are advantaged. The firm is advantaged… There are lots of advantages for you, including the fact that they are handling all the scheduling for you, they are going to be the ones hocking or pushing the client to see you, they’re going to be negotiating and know the rough edges because I have a relationship with the client and speak to those rough edges and overcome the issues. There are lots of advantages of working with a recruiter.

However, if for some reason they dropped the ball or they make a judgment that you disagree with, this is the way to find that about the job so the you can apply directly

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Job Search Radio

How Do You Get Past The Young Recruiter to The Hiring Manager | JobSearchRadio.com

recruiter1This is a question the someone asked me recently. I, personally, would not have referred to the person as, “the young recruiter.” I would just call them, “the recruiter.” Using the question was term suggests that the person is inexperienced and young. 

On today’s podcast, I offer a simple way to circumvent the recruiter. Try it!

Summary

The question I received was an interesting one and I will answer in multiple layers. The full question reads, "how do you get past the young recruiter who disqualifies you from age before decision-maker has a chance to consider you?" Great question! Let me answer it in several ways.

Number one is ageism shows up in a lot of different forms and, here, the ageism starts off by being presumptive. The presumption is I'm going to be discriminated against on the basis of age and ruled out because I'm old. I have no idea how will this individual is; for all I know they are 40 and they are being interviewed by someone who was 22.

They could be my age (by the way, I'm 65) an interview by someone 30.

The assumption is that your age is going to knock you out of contention when in fact, all knock you out of contention more often than not is your attitude. In this case, you're starting off with a chip on your shoulder and you are doing nothing to change attitudes.

You see, one of the things I know about older people is that they cop to this assumption of ageism very very quickly. And, unfortunately, they do nothing to defeat the bias. For example, when I'm talking to organizations and speaking with the 25-year-old recruiter, the 32-year-old manager, and they see this face of mine, it will be easy for me to say, "They weren't interested in me because I'm old."

But, in point of fact, if I haven't done a good enough job selling, if I have been personally persuasive that I was a better choice is a search for then there are other alternatives, that isn't about ageism; it's about how I sold myself. This happens it interviews much too often.

As soon as the older workers sees the 24-year-old in the room, they say themselves, "Oh, shoot. I have no chance here." Instead, they should be selling their energy, their drive and knowledge.

Often, an older worker is rejected because the resume says manager, director, VP all over it and it is a staff position they are applying for. It isn't the age that is a factor; it is the fact that they haven't been in the trenches doing the job day-to-day is being called for. Instead, they have been managing people, operating in a higher level than the job entails and then they come to the idea of ageism as being a factor. With that rant the side, let me go to the actual way of doing. If you have reason to believe proactively that this is going to occur.

First, demonstrating the background fits the role. Second, sit there with a smile on your face, instead of looking like a grump or grouch and answer all the questions.

When they ask, "So do you have any questions for us," at the end of the interview, ask great questions. Then, when you conclude the interview, put them in a bind.

The bind is, "Look, I know it's easy to reject me because you perceive me as an older worker and I won't get along with the hiring manager. That would be an easy thing to say. But my history would countermand that. My history shows that at and lastly firms I have worked for younger people. I help them be successful and I did that when asked because I understand that they had their lessons to learn and I'm not here to force myself on anyone. I want to be an ally for the hiring manager and support them with what they are trying to do. So, if you are concerned that I am a 'big gun' going into a little job or that I am an older guy who is going to work for younger woman, I've done it before and I'm happy to do it again."

That becomes part of the closing speech so that you are taking it straight on and putting them in a bind. Nothing works all the time, but what you've done is put them in a bind by calling them on it and addressing the "honest question" that is in the room. You answered it and put it on them to push you forward.

That's really the best way to do it--you address it head on at the very end of the interview as your last thing, when they are about to stand up and finish up. You looked him square in the eye, speak with sincerity from your heart and talk a little about how at your last few firms you've worked for younger managers, help them be affected, and enforced your ideas on them, have been there is a resource for them, but you're not there to push your ideas on them.

If they then turn around and say, "No. We want you for that," then you have something golden. However, your concern his voice to the question is that young HR guy, not getting through to the decision-maker – – the statistical probability is that the first half of this podcast is that the fact that you believe it's an issue is accurate and, if you want to get past the HR person I've given you a way to do it.

No matter, most people know that the goal is to connect with the hiring manager and avoid the applicant tracking system and the recruiter/screener. No one, however, explains how to do it.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for only $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”