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Getting on the Radar | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/12/10/getting-on-the-radar-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP1311 Jeff and David Perry discuss the mistakes people make with their LinkedIn profiles and much more.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Why Do Some LinkedIn Profiles Use General Job Functions Where the Title Usually Goes? | JobSearchTV.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2018/10/10/why-do-some-linkedin-profiles-use-general-job-functions-where-the-title-usually-goes-jobsearchradio-com/

Answer to yourself before watching my answer.

Summary

So I've got a fun question today. The question is, "why do some people on LinkedIn use general job functions where the title usually goes?"
It's a good question and I see that from time to time. There are a couple of possible reasons why people do it .Before I go into those, there are two areas where this can occur.
Number one is In the headline are The headline is where your name is. And then there's the line underneath it. So, underneath your name is one area where people often put their title. The other one is underneath their current and previous employers.
Both of areas where titles are pretty common. Now, in the in the case of the first one where we're dealing with, the. title, sometimes, isn't the best way to describe oneself. It's often best to think in terms of keywords and what the attraction would be in someone doing a search for you. So, if you think of LinkedIn and your individual profile as being something that needs to be search engine optimized like a website ,you want to have keywords there that will be attractive to firms looking for you.
So , inmy case, I might use the term recruiter .Headhunter. Terms along those lines because those describe what I do professionally and will be recognized by LinkedIn. (NOTE I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING)
Now, In either case, title sometimes are not quite descriptions. So, I sometimes see titles like "associate level 13. "What the hell does that mean? How is it different from an associate level 12 or 11 or 15? Instead of that, a pe?Rson might use a descriptor in that field in order to describe what it is that they do. So, that's one possible reason why someone might use terms that are search engine optimized or searchable or searched by people in order to be found in that spot It's not my ideal choice, but it's really a reason why.
Another reason why people do it is they made a mistake. They don't think their title is particularly relevant and it might be. So, sometimes people have mistaken notions of what should go in there, even though it's very clear. It says position so they duck the subject.
Maybe they're trying to indicate that they are not as high level or not as low level and they're trying to be described by function. But, when all is said and done, you know, when someone is being interviewed or spoken with my phone, they're going to be, "so what's your title," because it's a missing piece of information. Anything that's an omission or a conscious ommission becomes an area of Investigation by interviewers because they're curious.
Why did you choose to do that? Most people are relatively compliantand they do put in the position title. And why didn't you? That's the way I think. Anything that's out of the norm, I want to know more about . It doesn't make it bad, but it leaves me curious.
So far., I'm giving you the answers of. "they wanted use a search term and make that immediately visible." Sometimes it's a mistake that, most of the time, frankly,it is a mistake that job hunters make by putting it there because, frankly, you know at the end of the day, there's so much text particularly in the summary area where you can keyword stuff your profile to make it very attractive for search terms though.
Three main reasons I see .What do you think? Leave us a comment below. Let me know what your thoughts are.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Make It Easy for People to Reach You on LinkedIn | JobSearchTV.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter shares a personal networking success and a mistake many people make with their LinkedIn profiles.

Summary

I want tell you story and then tie it all in at the end. The story involves how I picked up a new client by using LinkedIn and its going to lead to one of the mistakes I see people making with LinkedIn.

So, I’ve got more than 10,000 1st level connections on LinkedIn (I actually have more than 23000) and, every once in a while, I like to send an email to people who are in HR, talent acquisition, obvious areas of hiring where I try to reconnect with them and see if there is any business there for me (NOTE: This was recorded wen I still did recruiting).

There was one person who I chose not to reach out to because I wasn't sure if he was working for a recruiting firm or not. I really don't connect with recruiters who are working third-party firms. But what he did is that he noticed I looked at his profile decided to give me a call and reintroduce himself because it had been probably 10 years since we last spoke and say, “Hi! How are you?” We chatted for a little bit and, then, he told me he was trying to hire a number of people. Now, what's the point of the story?

The point of the story is my profile made it easy for him to reach made. How did I do that? I want to point out how many people don't do this. Looking over at my profile, just to make sure you understand what I am doing. There is a way on LinkedIn to set up your contact information. You can provide your email address, phone number, your address, your IM, Twitter, websites that you are involved with plus and easy to work with LinkedIn URL to reach you.

I have in my office number and my email address. He went to my profile since we’re first level connections and found my phone number and called me. How many of you have your phone number there? I am going to tell you point-blank, of the 10,000 and change connections I have, very few people do. Why? You don't want to get interrupted at work. I understand that.

You you can put your home phone number in.

“I don’t want to get a phone call at home.”

What are you networking for? You call this networking? By having a connection on LinkedIn that you try mooch off of all the time? That you make it next to impossible for people to reach you with you call this a network? This is not how people network.

Networking involves developing a relationship with another person with variable to think of you when they have an opportunity and (watch this one) be able to reach you. Obviously, sometimes, you get calls or emails from people that the position description is off but, I want to point out to you, the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest, they don't always work the hardest … Although those are great qualities to have… people get ahead by being alert to opportunities. Sometimes, those are internal to their firm; more often than not, they are external.

One of the reasons you have a LinkedIn profile is so that opportunities (The sound of knocking) can knock at your door. If you make it hard for people to reach you, you are not networking.

So, put your email address and phone number in your profile. If you change jobs, update your email address and office phone number. Make it easy for people to reach you so that opportunity can knock at your door

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

LinkedIn Profile Mistakes | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2012)

NOTE: IF I REFER TO ANY OPEN POSITIONS, THEY WERE FILLED YEARS AGO. I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING. I DO JOB SEARCH COACHING.

You know your LinkedIn profile is important, yet people make lots of mistakes that I speak about today.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Stop With the Superlatives!

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to stop using superlatives to describe yourself in your resume and/or LinkedIn profile.

Summary

I want to talk with you today about a certain peeve I have about resumes. This extends to LinkedIn profiles as well, but, I was reminded of it when I was interviewing someone for Job Search Radio last week who laid it out so beautifully.

When you read a resume or LinkedIn profile and the person describes themselves with superlatives of any kind (it doesn't matter if there is one or 15; they are people who describe themselves with 15), when you describe yourself as a "visionary leader" with "extraordinary capabilities to enhance leadership ideas,"… No one believes you!

You just show yourself to be a fool. If anything, minimize your terms; being a minimalist when describing yourself is far more effective than these terms that are thought of as being BS. Why use the fluff when they do nothing to enhance the impression you give in people's minds about you and instead caused them to think worse of you?

One of you done that was so visionary anyway? Let's get practical about this. You're going to be interviewed and they're going to ask you, "What have you done this so visionary?"

What's your answer? Nothing. You have nothing that is visionary in your portfolio. It was all BS, they knew it and called you on it.

So, cut the crap and get down to the brass tacks. Tell people what you know and what you've done. What you've succeeded in and how much money you help your firm make or save. Get the metrics in there (remember, if you work for a public company, you need to be careful with sharing some of that information to avoid revealing something proprietary or confidential).

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Words NOT to Use in Your LinkedIn Profile

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you to avoid these cliches in your LinkedIn profile.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

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