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desperate job seekers

The Case for “The Desperate Job Hunter”


Employers and agency recruiters often treat certain job hunters as annoying. They aren’t. They are doing something that employers and agency recruiters say they want.

NOTE: I no longer do recruiting.

Summary

This video is a very simple one. It is about the insanity that you, representing a corporation for job hunters through, or you as an agency recruiter per job hunters through that I think is just goofy. Let me just lay it out for you. Let me use a story for myself.

When I was dating my wife, I had been trained and conditioned in a variety of ways to be an "attentive date." To care for what might be thought, to set up a nice evening for us… You know, be a good date Her response to that was, "Whoa! This is too much for me!"

For you representing the hiring organization or you representing an agency, let's look at the comparable thing . Job hunters have been trained to demonstrate that they are interested in the job. How does a job hunter really do that? Well, they respond to your calls, they send emails, on the interview, they talk about their interest. There are lots of different cues the job hunter were supposed to respond to and demonstrate their interest.

Sometimes, you folks respond to the frequent phone calls of follow-ups (you haven't given any real data. You just tell them that yoga back to them when you're ready to make a decision) and they are supposed to demonstrate continued interest. You basically treat this as an annoyance. Does it really make a lot of sense? Let's think about it. You want job hunters to be interested in your role, but not too interested. You want them to be kind of like my wife.

You want them to say, "(Said robotically) I am interested in the job," and then go away. And you think that's interest. Of course it isn't. And you wouldn't think it was interested they behave that way. They do what they do because the system tells them that they are supposed to show continued interest by following up with phone calls and sending periodic emails in the face of lack of consideration the most of you offer the job hunter. After all, you've led them to believe that you are ready to hire by interviewing them once, twice, 3 times… And then you leave them waiting to become anxious.

Maybe the anxiety is a tactic to make them want to job, but I don't think most of you thinking that way. I think that is the impact of your behavior, leaving them sitting there hoping that it is them that you choose. You leave them waiting for so long, building up their anxiety, so that they always check in to show that they are still interested.

Let's look at the game and how YOU'VE constructed it. For agency recruiters, I know you are the one who is the messenger or non-messenger for your client. I know your client is giving you nothing to really say. After a while it's hard to pick up the phone and say, "Nothing new. Nothing is changed since we spoke last." It's a week later and nothing is changed and the candidates started to lose interest in becoming fearful. They call the next week. "Nothing new." I understand the client is being ridiculous. If you challenge the client, you risk losing them by pissing them off. I get but also understand where the job applicant is coming from.

By the way, you guys create the results that you get. The result is the frequent phone calls. The fact that there is no new information, even if you as a corporate recruiter say to the job hunter, "I know we have gone a little bit longer than we expected. We expect to get this tied up by . . . " Even if that they slips a day or 2, you are okay. You've communicated something.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Cx5=PL: What Every Company Looks for When They Hire | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the key elements firms assess for when they interview.

Summary

I want to talk with you about what firms look for when they hire someone. I've distilled it down to a math formula – –Cx5=PL. it is really what every firm is assessing for when they hire someone.

The 1st "C" that they are looking for comes from the fact that they have developed a job description. They are looking for skills COMPETENCE. We all know from our own experiences that not everyone who gets hired is competent. There obviously some other attributes that come into play, too-- soft skills that firms look out for.

The 2nd "C" that firms look out for is self-CONFIDENCE. This is the ability to exude passion and enthusiasm for what you do, that causes them to believe that you can do what they need you to do.

The 3rd "C" is CHEMISTRY. This is how you fit into an organization. Generally, firms say that they want to hire individuals for staff roles who are "team players" as opposed to "lone wolves" or "Mavericks." I really have no idea how they assess for that. That is however what they say they are looking for.

The 4th "C" is CHARACTER. Do you have character? Are you a character? Do you demonstrate both to them at the time of your interview? Some jobs really want "a character." Some jobs require that they hire someone with character; other positions require someone with both. Firms will want to get a feel for that when they interview.

The 5th "C" in this formula is my personal favorite – – CHARISMA. Charismatic people always do better than non-charismatics. I can demonstrate that to you by pointing out that we look at a few of our recent presidents – – Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama. Completely different people with completely different policies. Yet America, love them all. Why? Objectively, it doesn't fit. In point of fact, it was just something about them that when they walked into her room, people love them.

All 5 of these "C's" all add up to PL. PERSONAL LEADERSHIP. This is the quality that says that you inspire confidence that you are the solution to a need.

When firms interview, it's not like they're going to turn around and say, "So, are you a leader?" "Yes. Great! That's the answer were looking for!" It doesn't work that way.

They look for behaviors that demonstrate congruence with the image of a leader. As such, is not just what you say that matters. It's how you carry yourself in the course of the interview and it's congruence with their image of how someone should conduct themselves the counts.

Every question they ask as a macro and micro component to it. The macro is the big picture of your background and how it is congruent with their image of someone who would be in this role. The micro is the minutia-- the answer to the question. Your behavior has to demonstrate you carrying yourself in a way that is congruent with someone in this job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

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What Companies Look for When they Hire | Job Search Radio


When thinking about finding a job, it’s common for job hunters to focus on themselves and forget about the employer and their needs. That mistake can be instrumental in failing with their networking, their resume, their phone interviews . . . every step in the recruiting process can be adversely affected by that critical oversite.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks with Emily Quinn about what companies look for when they recruit people, evaluate resumes and interview someone.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Interviewing for Core Values, Not Fit. (VIDEO)


I’m not a believer in interviewing for fit. I am a believer in interviewing for core values. Here I explain why and suggest a model for core values developed by Lance Secretan.

Summary

I have been a complainer about how firms interview for fit. Let me summarize it for you. When most firms interview for fit, they are using completely subjective criteria that can introduce bias into their decision-making.

For example, "I don't like them."
"Why?"
"I don't know."

Well, what does that really do?

I'm a big believer that you interview for qualifications. From there, given that you're not using any objective measures to evaluate your own people or using any objective measures to evaluate this person, instead of going for, "got," you evaluate for qualifications. In addition, if you're having someone interview for you, give them information about what you want them to cover in the interview, how you want them to do it, and debrief them by asking, "Did you find that they were qualified?" That's it.

If the answer by saying, "I don't know," probe.

"They gave me an answer that… I don't know?" Then, you have to go into greater detail interview them again. It's not enough to deal with soft factors , because that is where a person's biases can show up.

"I don't like them," can mean, "I don't like working with strong women," or, "I don't like working with foreigners," . . . Any number of biases can show up in the equation that you have to get out of the process. However, I am a big believer in interviewing for core values.

I had a wonderful conversation with an old client recently who was doing a presentation for his firm. We were talking about my opinion of fit in the assessment process and he told me that his firm has very strong core values that they really believe in. That's fine. Core values to me, where a person signals in the course of answering the question that they don't match up with core values . . That's a valid criteria.

For example, this firm has a core value around teamwork. When you interview someone who is all "me" oriented, rather than simply reject them, you have to go investigate what it was because it could have been them who really was the impetus for change!

I would offer you a different model using an acronym that Lance Secretan has developed. Lance is a coach who developed this model called The Castle Principles (TM). It is a wonderful model for evaluating people. Let me walk you through it.

The "C" in Castle is courage. Tell me about a time in your past . When you had to face the headwinds and still stood your ground. This isn't about being oppositional to teamwork but about having strong belief. To me, change often comes from small incremental steps to move forward. Another question you can ask is, "Tell me about a time in your life where you had to make a difficult change. Maybe he was at work. Maybe it was in your personal life."

The "A" is for Authenticity. You getting a sensor person that they are authentic and what they say and believe. Inj an interview, that's a difficult thing to do. After all, you are on good behavior and so are they. You look for ways to break down the barriers between you.

"S" it is for Service. How has this person been in service to others in their life. It could be either inside or outside of their work life. How have they served others?

"T" is for Truthfulness. Tell me about something hard that you had to take on. Tell me about something difficult to take on and you did. Answering this question may involve courage as well.

"L" it is for Love. Tell me about a situation where you "loved up" 1 of the people. By that I mean tell me about something where you should care for 1 of your people, when they were struggling. Maybe you pitched in during a difficult situation with your team.

"E" it is for Effectiveness. You can't be effective without all these things being in place.

No one wants to work for someone who is inauthentic, right? No one wants to work for someone who is only looking out for themselves, or acts like a "drone."

Thing to interview for. I use this model as I have interviewed people; I'm going to encourage you to do the same thing.

Look at this model and come up with your own questions around courage, authenticity, service, truthfulness, love and effectiveness

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

3 Steps to Better Interviews

10 Questions You Should Ask Executive Candidates (VIDEO)


When you are interviewing executive candidates, here are 10 questions you should ask executive candidates.

Summary

I put together 10 questions that I thought should be asked of each executive that you or your firm interviews. I want to be clear that these questions don't deal with an objective evaluation of their knowledge. These fall into the category of "everything else." If you like to ask knowledge-based questions obviously can't be on the list because I cannot cover every topic. I can have questions that allow people to assess them for their leadership.

1. Describe a time you faced an unforeseen issue and how you diffused and resolve the situation.

2. How have you helped your firm make or save money? How much?

3. In your last position. What was your strategy for building relationships with your team? With your peers? With the people that you served?

4. Tell me about a time where you and or your team faced challenging odds and had you keep them motivated, engaged and inspired to overcome the situation and succeed. I personally like inspired rather than motivated. Inspiration is an internal force; motivation is external… But that's a conversation for another occasion.

5. Explain a time when you had to promote an idea or a project to a group and how did you go about persuading the others?

6. Describe a time when you had to deal with conflict in your department and how did you handle it?

7. (I love this 1 and the next one in particular) Why does your management style work? I think it's an interesting question because you're acknowledging that it does work , but why does it work? Is this just something that they pulled out of the seat-of-the-pants or has there been conscious decision-making about it? I trust that you as the leader of an organization can smell BS. That's the most important factor here.

8. Who are your enemies and how did you make them? This is a new favorite question of mine for leadership interviews. I learned it from someone I'm coaching who is a COO candidate and someone asked of him. I love this question because leaders usually make enemies along the way; you want them to be self-aware enough to notice them. You don't want them to say, " I have no enemies. Everybody loves me. I'm like a good puppy.. Everybody loves me."Everybody makes enemies.Someone has to be prepared to divulge that so you know that there are honest.

9. What professional accomplishments are you most proud of and why? This is a softball question. If they can't answer that one with a big smile on their face, there's something wrong here.

10. (Notice I built up through some challenging questions and then throw in a softball. Now this 1) What is the hardest criticism you've heard over the course of your management career ( or your leadership/Executive career)? This is an opportunity for the person to be self-aware in front of you; they have a chance to talk about their successes and mistakes..You want to hear about the mistakes and flush them outBut you also want to get a sense of the character of the individual here in order to find out whether they can be trusted with the keys to your organizational "car."

Most people this level have a great propensity for preparation and the ability to present things in cogent ways. Questions 7, 8 and 10 are designed to be personally revealing. You'll learn a lot from their answers but they are set up by the others.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

What’s Wrong With Your Hiring and Staff Management (VIDEO)


There is a very basic disconnect that has occurred in hiring and management. Here I discuss a few the ways  that it breaks down.

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Summary

The employer's idea of engagement

I thought of doing a video today that really talks about the hiring process, what isn't working, and what is breaking down. There is a statistic I saw not long ago that whether you're a job hunter or a hiring manager, more than 70% of you really hate the process of hiring. You start off at that premise and within 18 months, more than half of the respondents regretted taking the job or hiring the person. In other words, things break down. There is a disconnect between what is sought in the way of experience and what you are getting.

One statistic said that 46% of new hires leave a job within their 1st year. Catch that one. Almost 50% employee turnover. When you start looking at engagement numbers... Let me digress for a moment. Employee engagement is the lowest common denominator. In the US, the engagement rate is a little over 30%. That translates into more than two thirds of the workforce really doesn't care. They are not engaged in their work. They are going through the motions. That compares to less than one third who actually care.

They are involved with their work. Are they excellent that it? No. They are trying. The rest of your workforce doesn't care and they are acting out by being oblivious.

You have to pause for a 2nd and ask yourself, "What's wrong? Why is this not working?" I have to start off with the hiring process and then look at the management process.

Often from the hiring perspective, there is a disconnect between what you are looking for and who you actually hire. 1 of my pet peeves about the hiring process is the notion that hiring managers are involved with hiring for fit, yet have no objective measure for figuring out how a person will fit in. As a result, they go by gut instinct.

"This person reminds me of so-and-so." The result is, they forget a basic fact. The basic fact is that everyone involved with interviewing is on good behavior. You are on good behavior. If you are an angry individual you are putting on a great show and hiding it. If you are a grumpy person, you're putting on a good show and hiding it. You don't reveal that.

The job hunter was also putting on a good show because from their perspective, they want to put on a good face and give the impression that they are competent and have the right skills. They want to create the impression that there are nice person you can know like and trust and all that happy stuff. What do you expect?

You are not being yourself. And they are not being themselves. And that's the position that you're judging from. Each of you is on good behavior and thus it shouldn't be a surprise that the notion of fit doesn't work. In addition, you haven't evaluated your own team using test measures; you're not evaluating the potential higher using test measures and making comparisons with your existing team either. As a result, it should be no surprise that things break down.

I've done videos that discuss the mistakes in hiring. For example, a hiring manager has someone evaluate someone for their knowledge that is required for the position but doesn't really offer much guidance in what they want the person to be evaluated for. Asinine questions get pulled in. In a game of, "Can you top this?" Even though the skill being evaluated for the asinine question may only be used once every 5 years. There is nonsense and often shows up in the evaluation process.

Here's another fun thing. Once they are on board and once everyone is getting back to being themselves, people are often treated as though they are robots. Workers tossed over the transom to them. No real relationship has been developed between the hiring manager and this new staff person. Employees start to recognize that they are being treated like commodity workers like they were before rather than human beings or give the notion to them that in any way they are special or important.

A great story I read about Southwest Airlines which is consistently 1 of those firms that people want to go to work for. They really have employee culture that respects them. 1 of the stories I read basically involved how the firm response to every customer service letter and tries to make things right.

One customer wrote to the airline complaining that they didn't like boarding the airplane en masse, that there is no 1st class seating, that she didn't like peanuts and then went on to 5 or 6 things that you really found annoying including that the airline staff and crew were excessively friendly. She complained about 5 or 6 things. The people in customer service really didn't know how to respond to her. So they passed it up the chain of command until it arrived at the desk of the president of Southwest Airlines, Herb Kelleher.

Kelleher wrote back to the individual, and I want you to pay attention to what he said because it's really important. He wrote back to her and said, "We'll miss you as a customer." It was more important to him to maintain the integrity of the culture which is high employee engagement, care for the employee because he doesn't believe that the customer is always right. He believes that the employee, if backed up, will always want to do things right.

He will help employees do well, hire people who want to do well and go out and do the best that they can and yes, they will make mistakes. We all have bad days. We all make mistakes. By backing up his employees in telling this individual, "We'll miss you," he preserves the culture.

How does that apply to you as a hiring manager? What are you doing to show the people that you really care about them? Seriously?

"I give them a review!" My favorite story about reviews comes from a coach named Lance Secretan who tells a wonderful story. "Imagine a process where every 6 months you sit down with your wife or husband or partner and say, "It's 6 months now. It's time for me to give you a review on how you're doing." Do you think you be living there very long if that was part of the process? Yet in employment this is considered a good thing to do!

The employer's idea of engagement is, "We're going to give you feedback on how you doing. The good stuff, but mostly the not good stuff."This is done instead of supporting them all the way through the process, Backing them up, making them feel like they are important to your organization and stuff along those lines.

My encouragement to you is to think like a human being there for second.Talk to people like people, particularly the ones who work for you and you work for.In the hiring process, stop putting on an act. Get clear with you people about what you want them to evaluate For and how you want them to evaluate for it. When you get feedback from your people about qualifications don't ask if you like them. Ask if they are qualified.If not, how so?If so, what were their strengths?Where did they show up. Not quite as good? Get that information..

Once the new hire is on board do things, not to engage them (Remember, engagement is a nonsense term)But to help people feel as thoughYou really care about them.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

A Great Interview Question for Employers to Ask (VIDEO)


Here I offer up a great question for employers to ask that is very revealing about the job applicant, particularly executive candidates.

Summary

This is a video geared toward employers, rather than job hunters. The short version of the question is, you are an employer, and are interviewing someone. You want to get a sense of their preparedness. After you been talking with them for a little while and discuss some of the pleasantries, ask them this question, "How did you prepare for this interview?"

It's a very simple question that reveals a lot. There's a difference in the answer of, "I went to a Wikipedia page. Then I went to the company's website and read that." That is one level of answer.

The more senior someone is, the more depth I want you to expect of them. For example, from a factual perspective, you might hear them start by saying, "Well, I did a review of the company website and did a Google search to get a sense of how the business was doing and the challenges that it was facing. I found several articles were really quite interesting. Then I went to your LinkedIn profile discovered that we were 3rd level connections so I can see all that much. But then I used the chrome extension called Prophet that I use for. circumstances like this so I can look at your background in greater detail. What that allowed me to do beyond simply look at your LinkedIn public profile, was that your email address, phone numbers, see where you are on social media and then visit some of the other places. I don't want to say I was stalking you

I don’t want to say I was stalking you, but I started following you to get more holistic picture of you in your work.”

This answer’s a little bit different than the, “I looked at your Wikipedia page,” answer. That’s one level of an answer.

You may have noticed that as I offered the more in-depth answer, you want to listen for not just the depth but the excitement as they speak. If you listen to someone who speaks in a flat way as they say, “Well, I went to the company website,” that is one level of response.

However, if they talk with enthusiasm and passion, with a twinkle in her eyes that you can detect whether it is in person or over the phone, their answer may not be as in-depth as I offered up but the more you hear the excitement in their voice, isn’t that more likely to be the better individual for you to consider hiring?

They are more mature individual, more self-confident, show more self-assurance, more willing to expose themselves and demonstrate the effort that went into it versus that voice that almost seems disinterested when they say, “Well, I went to the company website. Look to your LinkedIn page…” That is a lot different in answer.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchTV.com

How Long Does It Take to Screen Resumes? | JobSearchTV.com


Someone from a smaller firm asks how long it takes to screen resumes because they think they are spending too much money for an external recruiter.

Summary

The question for today is, "How long does it take to screen resumes?" This question is asked from the vantage point of an employer who is using a recruiter, who is finding good, but not great candidates for them. As they write, "For each position, we get 3 to 5 candidates who are referred to the hiring manager." They are thinking of bringing the process in-house and using tools like ziprecruiter and Workable. They are recruiting for IT positions. . "How long is it going take 2 narrow things down to get those same 3 to 5 options?"

The real question I want to start off pointing out is most people undervalue a recruiter and what they do. After all, you are seeing the results of their efforts (those 3 to 5 resumes); you don't know what they did to get those 3 to 5 resumes. For example, you are looking at those 3 to 5 resumes and thinking to yourself, "I can get 3 to 5 resumes if I use those tools. What's the problem?"

So the problem starts off with who is going to screen those resumes when people apply for your position? Who is going to do the pre-interview with them? Who is going to evaluate the respondents? I know what I was doing recruiting, I would receive hundreds of pieces of garbage that were little more than spam. Some systems may have a data dictionary that will screen resumes for particular keywords; sometimes the system is messed things. If you're okay with that, let's move on.

Using myself as an example, on Monday morning. It was typical for me to walk into 200 to 250 resumes and then have to start going through them. In the usual 3 to 5 seconds that normally is used, you do the math – – if I operated like a machine. It was actually able to do each resume in 5 seconds, with 5 seconds to open up the next one and delete the previous one, it is 6 resumes per minute. If I received 250 resumes, it may take a little bit more than 40 minutes to go through them.

But I get interrupted, I get distracted and I am not a machine. It is boring to read little more than spam , and you have to take a few seconds to figure out, "What are they saying that they do" before you delete it.

As I said in early podcast of Job Search Radio, out of those 250 resumes. I may actually interview to people. Let's use your own math here. You're stuck in this position of going through resumes to find, perhaps, to the might vaguely appear qualified ... It may take about 2 hours of labor time.

Remember, there are days that go by where I'm not even seem to resumes that are worth my calling. It is awful, but it is true. So in the context of finding those 3 to 5 people that you want to locate on your own, you will probably take several days and that is before you start pre-interviewing people before deciding to forward them to the hiring manager.

Now, remember, all the math I'm referring to here is with "dedicated effort." However, with a firm that is small, you are not going to have a dedicated resource doing this. Doing this is going to be ancillary to their job. After all, if you had someone dedicated to this resource already, you wouldn't be asking this question! This person would already be doing the prescreening for you and you wouldn't be using a recruiter.

This is a small firm and this will be an "add-on function" to someone's workday and it will take more time than you think. If you're okay with that, that's fine. But that's really what you're paying the external recruiter to do. You are paying them to do that screening to reduce it to those 3 to 5 potential hires.

I would say that easily it can take a week to a week and 1/2 to identify those 3 to 5 people while this person is doing something else.

If that is worth it to you, if that expenditure of time which may prove out to be pointless (that's because the people that they identify may not fit either.), go ahead and bring it in-house. If you are not sure and you want to cut your costs, instead of doing all of this, reduce your recruiter fee. Reduce it by 2%. If you are currently paying a 25% fee, make it 23%. If you are paying a 20% fee, make it 18%.

Simply say, "I want to continue to give you an exclusive on these jobs. We are evaluating internal resources , and I want to continue to consider you because you been very helpful to us and this might be a way that we can get around it."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Human Error In Hiring

Human Error in Hiring (VIDEO)


The statistics show that most hiring managers have buyers remorse within 6 months after hiring someone. Where does it break down? Well, the answer is human error.

 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with those of you who hire people as part of your work. There's a real simple point I want to make today and I won't take up a lot of your time. I think it's a very useful want to learn to be reminded of.

The lesson is that if you are having trouble hiring, if the people that you're bringing on board aren't effective, the issue isn't in HR. The issue is with you and with your team who are involved with the evaluation process. Let's see where it can break down.

So you take a job description and start interviewing people. Often, what happens, particularly in large organizations, is that you have a job description, but it was something that was approved years ago, someone in HR which is in their system, pulls it out and gets approved and you are off to the races. You share with different third-party recruiters who start screening people against that spec, but you've actually tweaked it in a number of different ways but don't tell them about the tweaks. As a result, you don't get next to the full range of potential hires that could be useful to you. As a result, they may be sending the right one by accident.

That may not be you. Let's look at where most likely is you.

You have people in only routine that you use to start evaluating and assessing people but you're not very clear about what you want them to evaluate for. As a result, what they do is start pulling arbitrary questions out. If you don't believe me, you are ignoring my 40+ years of experience doing this. It happens all the time. You haven't been clear enough with your team about all you want them to assess for.

By this I mean, "Sam, I want you to talk with them about this. These are the points I want you to hit with them and I want to see how they measure up. Tell me what their answers are and give me some feedback." From they are, you don't ask your subordinate, "Did you like them?" The one question you ask is, "Were they qualified? How did they answer this question? " That is all you care about… Qualifications, not whether they were liked.

You want diversity of thought, but no one arbitrary questions asked. You want to meet a baseline of expectations.

From there (this is the big one, folks), you get off script. You, as a hiring manager make a mistake... The mistake of liking this person as a person. As they say in the psychotherapy world, you project attributes onto this individual that they don't have.

I say this because, you have to remember, from the job hunter perspective, they are on good behavior. They're not this way in real life. YOU may not be acting this way in real life; you may also be on good behavior. As a result, each of you may be wearing a "costume"and thus how do you figure out whether this human being is the right person who will fit into your group?

That's why I always say, forget about fit. There are the obvious examples like the person who walks in wearing shorts to interview with the all suit environment. Isn't going to work out in the all suit environment.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you are interested in executive job search or leadership coaching, email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us.In the subject line, include the word “Coaching.”

Measuring The Right Thing When You Hire (VIDEO)


If Peter Drucker is right, you can’t manage what you don’t measure. But what if you are managing the wrong thing? What if your measurements are incomplete?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice and encouragement, visit my website, <a href="http://
www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com” >www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

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