google-site-verification: googleb943d61bcb9cdbf7.html

Make a Decision!


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages firms to either make a decision and explains why this is important.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching,  all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Stop Looking for Team Players


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells employers, HR professionals and business owners to stop looking for “team players.”

Summary

Let me talk with you about some of your job descriptions and how ridiculous they can be sometimes. I did recruiting for more than 40 years and it is so rare to see a job description that doesn't talk about team players.

What is it about being a team player that has become so popular in our lexicon?

Do you think a guy like Steve Jobs is a team player? No disrespect to our past president, but you think Barack Obama was a team player?

No! These guys are leaders. These guys are visionaries. Are you trying to hire drones or are you trying to hire exceptional talent who are trying to move your business forward?
You don't want people to have an imagination. You don't want people who can inspire. You just want people to shut up and do a job and, I must tell you, as I talk to people, more and more people pick up on that words responding to those kind of positions.

Many of you have business cards that say you are in the talent acquisition field. The way you act, I think you are trying to hire a little more than bookkeepers. They may have fancy job titles but you really want little more than that.

The result is that most of you are hiring little more than mediocrity. You really want cooperation; you don't want exceptional individuals. I'm not saying you have to hire a renegade maverick unless yours is a startup where you really need to hire people who think creatively and differently.

But for most of you who work for large organizations, I must in all honesty say cut out that phrase. What you're doing is telegraphing the fact that you don't want people to think.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Pick Up the Pace

Pick Up The Pace (VIDEO)


Take it or leave it. Too many firms are still operating with this recession era mentality and losing candidates to other firms.

On this show, I walk through some of the BLS numbers and point out some changes you need to make.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

5 questions to ask at any interview

5 Questions (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter suggests that you develop five questions that are asked on every interview with your firm.

Summary

This is a simple philosophical approach to interviewing vice think should permeate most organizations.

The simple suggestion I want to make is, there should be 5 questions that are asked on every interview. I'm not talking about for example, objective questions about accounting, if you are interviewing an accountant. I'm not talking about programming questions. I'm talking about core philosophical questions that should be as fun every interview.

I understand that this is easier to implement in a smaller firm where there might be face-to-face conversations between participants of the firm. It can certainly be developed in midsized organizations because 1 of the things that can come from this is that you can track the top characteristics of high performance the organization of the course of time based upon how they answer these questions.

Think in terms of what are the core values of your firm and how you would want to assess someone for those core values. I don't care what type of organization it is, all of you represent firms that have core values. All of you have organizations within those firms that have core values. Find what those common elements are and then ask questions that will help you to deduce whether someone might be a cultural fit for your organization. Then, what someone is on board, track have someone actually measured up with some of your bigger successes.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

Two Questions to Ask if You Want to Hire Someone With Ambition? (VIDEO)


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

Here are 2 questions that you can ask in order to identify potential hires who are ambitious.

Summary

Money, power, recognition, status, variety, career.

Today I have a question for employers that is designed to identify people who are ambitious. Here are 2 questions you can ask in the course of the interview.

The 1st question comes from Reid Hoffman. It is apparently a question he uses and encouraged to be used at LinkedIn when they were interviewing staff. The question is, "What job do you want to have after this 1?" Interesting question, isn't it?

The assumption the question is that you're not going to stay here forever and the truth is, no one does, right? So let's not kid ourselves. What is this job going to be the steppingstone for? Is the elephant in the room for employers. They know you're not going to stay. They know you're not going to jointly work for the company for 40 years, right? Let's find out how ambitious someone is.

If you are beginner and start talking about becoming the Grand Poobah a C level professional, you can work with the assumption that there going to be there for a long time , but I don't think that I believe it and think your unrealistic. Again, I think it's a great question for identifying ambition.

Here's another one and I think you have to recognize the subtlety in it. I want you to rate these factors: happiness, Money, power, recognition, status, variety, career.
Happiness is a throwaway answer because everyone should want happiness.  The answer isn't necessarily in the answers themselves but in the follow-up.

When I would use this question, I would only be curious about happiness if it wasn't their 1st choice.  To me, not putting happiness. 1st was the quirky answer.  From there, money, power, recognition, status, variety and career… You want to ask questions . . . Why is this important to you?  It is in the follow-up that you learn.  There is no right answer to this.

So, for example,  if you are in the business for you want people more money motivated, you might want money is the 2nd choice But you have to ask the follow-up question.  What is a lot of money to you means different things to different people.  I  remember following up with one person with that question and learned that he would buy a used car and fix it up.  His definition of a lot of money and other people's definition of a lot of money were very different. Had I not asked that question I never would have known and would have wound up with what someone with low drive on the financial side. 

So, again, it's not important what the specific answer is until you start collecting data about who works in your organization and who works out well. That is going to take time. With time, you can find that help people with certain qualities work out for you. Again, It is a very simple question where all you have to do is hand them a sheet of paper, s pen and asked them to rate the 7 factors for you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B011GK0ADE

 

 

 

 

 

 

desperate job seekers

The Case for “The Desperate Job Hunter”


Employers and agency recruiters often treat certain job hunters as annoying. They aren’t. They are doing something that employers and agency recruiters say they want.

NOTE: I no longer do recruiting.

Summary

This video is a very simple one. It is about the insanity that you, representing a corporation for job hunters through, or you as an agency recruiter per job hunters through that I think is just goofy. Let me just lay it out for you. Let me use a story for myself.

When I was dating my wife, I had been trained and conditioned in a variety of ways to be an "attentive date." To care for what might be thought, to set up a nice evening for us… You know, be a good date Her response to that was, "Whoa! This is too much for me!"

For you representing the hiring organization or you representing an agency, let's look at the comparable thing . Job hunters have been trained to demonstrate that they are interested in the job. How does a job hunter really do that? Well, they respond to your calls, they send emails, on the interview, they talk about their interest. There are lots of different cues the job hunter were supposed to respond to and demonstrate their interest.

Sometimes, you folks respond to the frequent phone calls of follow-ups (you haven't given any real data. You just tell them that yoga back to them when you're ready to make a decision) and they are supposed to demonstrate continued interest. You basically treat this as an annoyance. Does it really make a lot of sense? Let's think about it. You want job hunters to be interested in your role, but not too interested. You want them to be kind of like my wife.

You want them to say, "(Said robotically) I am interested in the job," and then go away. And you think that's interest. Of course it isn't. And you wouldn't think it was interested they behave that way. They do what they do because the system tells them that they are supposed to show continued interest by following up with phone calls and sending periodic emails in the face of lack of consideration the most of you offer the job hunter. After all, you've led them to believe that you are ready to hire by interviewing them once, twice, 3 times… And then you leave them waiting to become anxious.

Maybe the anxiety is a tactic to make them want to job, but I don't think most of you thinking that way. I think that is the impact of your behavior, leaving them sitting there hoping that it is them that you choose. You leave them waiting for so long, building up their anxiety, so that they always check in to show that they are still interested.

Let's look at the game and how YOU'VE constructed it. For agency recruiters, I know you are the one who is the messenger or non-messenger for your client. I know your client is giving you nothing to really say. After a while it's hard to pick up the phone and say, "Nothing new. Nothing is changed since we spoke last." It's a week later and nothing is changed and the candidates started to lose interest in becoming fearful. They call the next week. "Nothing new." I understand the client is being ridiculous. If you challenge the client, you risk losing them by pissing them off. I get but also understand where the job applicant is coming from.

By the way, you guys create the results that you get. The result is the frequent phone calls. The fact that there is no new information, even if you as a corporate recruiter say to the job hunter, "I know we have gone a little bit longer than we expected. We expect to get this tied up by . . . " Even if that they slips a day or 2, you are okay. You've communicated something.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Cx5=PL: What Every Company Looks for When They Hire | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the key elements firms assess for when they interview.

Summary

I want to talk with you about what firms look for when they hire someone. I've distilled it down to a math formula – –Cx5=PL. it is really what every firm is assessing for when they hire someone.

The 1st "C" that they are looking for comes from the fact that they have developed a job description. They are looking for skills COMPETENCE. We all know from our own experiences that not everyone who gets hired is competent. There obviously some other attributes that come into play, too-- soft skills that firms look out for.

The 2nd "C" that firms look out for is self-CONFIDENCE. This is the ability to exude passion and enthusiasm for what you do, that causes them to believe that you can do what they need you to do.

The 3rd "C" is CHEMISTRY. This is how you fit into an organization. Generally, firms say that they want to hire individuals for staff roles who are "team players" as opposed to "lone wolves" or "Mavericks." I really have no idea how they assess for that. That is however what they say they are looking for.

The 4th "C" is CHARACTER. Do you have character? Are you a character? Do you demonstrate both to them at the time of your interview? Some jobs really want "a character." Some jobs require that they hire someone with character; other positions require someone with both. Firms will want to get a feel for that when they interview.

The 5th "C" in this formula is my personal favorite – – CHARISMA. Charismatic people always do better than non-charismatics. I can demonstrate that to you by pointing out that we look at a few of our recent presidents – – Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama. Completely different people with completely different policies. Yet America, love them all. Why? Objectively, it doesn't fit. In point of fact, it was just something about them that when they walked into her room, people love them.

All 5 of these "C's" all add up to PL. PERSONAL LEADERSHIP. This is the quality that says that you inspire confidence that you are the solution to a need.

When firms interview, it's not like they're going to turn around and say, "So, are you a leader?" "Yes. Great! That's the answer were looking for!" It doesn't work that way.

They look for behaviors that demonstrate congruence with the image of a leader. As such, is not just what you say that matters. It's how you carry yourself in the course of the interview and it's congruence with their image of how someone should conduct themselves the counts.

Every question they ask as a macro and micro component to it. The macro is the big picture of your background and how it is congruent with their image of someone who would be in this role. The micro is the minutia-- the answer to the question. Your behavior has to demonstrate you carrying yourself in a way that is congruent with someone in this job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

.

What Companies Look for When they Hire | Job Search Radio


When thinking about finding a job, it’s common for job hunters to focus on themselves and forget about the employer and their needs. That mistake can be instrumental in failing with their networking, their resume, their phone interviews . . . every step in the recruiting process can be adversely affected by that critical oversite.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks with Emily Quinn about what companies look for when they recruit people, evaluate resumes and interview someone.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Interviewing for Core Values, Not Fit. (VIDEO)


I’m not a believer in interviewing for fit. I am a believer in interviewing for core values. Here I explain why and suggest a model for core values developed by Lance Secretan.

Summary

I have been a complainer about how firms interview for fit. Let me summarize it for you. When most firms interview for fit, they are using completely subjective criteria that can introduce bias into their decision-making.

For example, "I don't like them."
"Why?"
"I don't know."

Well, what does that really do?

I'm a big believer that you interview for qualifications. From there, given that you're not using any objective measures to evaluate your own people or using any objective measures to evaluate this person, instead of going for, "got," you evaluate for qualifications. In addition, if you're having someone interview for you, give them information about what you want them to cover in the interview, how you want them to do it, and debrief them by asking, "Did you find that they were qualified?" That's it.

If the answer by saying, "I don't know," probe.

"They gave me an answer that… I don't know?" Then, you have to go into greater detail interview them again. It's not enough to deal with soft factors , because that is where a person's biases can show up.

"I don't like them," can mean, "I don't like working with strong women," or, "I don't like working with foreigners," . . . Any number of biases can show up in the equation that you have to get out of the process. However, I am a big believer in interviewing for core values.

I had a wonderful conversation with an old client recently who was doing a presentation for his firm. We were talking about my opinion of fit in the assessment process and he told me that his firm has very strong core values that they really believe in. That's fine. Core values to me, where a person signals in the course of answering the question that they don't match up with core values . . That's a valid criteria.

For example, this firm has a core value around teamwork. When you interview someone who is all "me" oriented, rather than simply reject them, you have to go investigate what it was because it could have been them who really was the impetus for change!

I would offer you a different model using an acronym that Lance Secretan has developed. Lance is a coach who developed this model called The Castle Principles (TM). It is a wonderful model for evaluating people. Let me walk you through it.

The "C" in Castle is courage. Tell me about a time in your past . When you had to face the headwinds and still stood your ground. This isn't about being oppositional to teamwork but about having strong belief. To me, change often comes from small incremental steps to move forward. Another question you can ask is, "Tell me about a time in your life where you had to make a difficult change. Maybe he was at work. Maybe it was in your personal life."

The "A" is for Authenticity. You getting a sensor person that they are authentic and what they say and believe. Inj an interview, that's a difficult thing to do. After all, you are on good behavior and so are they. You look for ways to break down the barriers between you.

"S" it is for Service. How has this person been in service to others in their life. It could be either inside or outside of their work life. How have they served others?

"T" is for Truthfulness. Tell me about something hard that you had to take on. Tell me about something difficult to take on and you did. Answering this question may involve courage as well.

"L" it is for Love. Tell me about a situation where you "loved up" 1 of the people. By that I mean tell me about something where you should care for 1 of your people, when they were struggling. Maybe you pitched in during a difficult situation with your team.

"E" it is for Effectiveness. You can't be effective without all these things being in place.

No one wants to work for someone who is inauthentic, right? No one wants to work for someone who is only looking out for themselves, or acts like a "drone."

Thing to interview for. I use this model as I have interviewed people; I'm going to encourage you to do the same thing.

Look at this model and come up with your own questions around courage, authenticity, service, truthfulness, love and effectiveness

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

3 Steps to Better Interviews

10 Questions You Should Ask Executive Candidates (VIDEO)


When you are interviewing executive candidates, here are 10 questions you should ask executive candidates.

Summary

I put together 10 questions that I thought should be asked of each executive that you or your firm interviews. I want to be clear that these questions don't deal with an objective evaluation of their knowledge. These fall into the category of "everything else." If you like to ask knowledge-based questions obviously can't be on the list because I cannot cover every topic. I can have questions that allow people to assess them for their leadership.

1. Describe a time you faced an unforeseen issue and how you diffused and resolve the situation.

2. How have you helped your firm make or save money? How much?

3. In your last position. What was your strategy for building relationships with your team? With your peers? With the people that you served?

4. Tell me about a time where you and or your team faced challenging odds and had you keep them motivated, engaged and inspired to overcome the situation and succeed. I personally like inspired rather than motivated. Inspiration is an internal force; motivation is external… But that's a conversation for another occasion.

5. Explain a time when you had to promote an idea or a project to a group and how did you go about persuading the others?

6. Describe a time when you had to deal with conflict in your department and how did you handle it?

7. (I love this 1 and the next one in particular) Why does your management style work? I think it's an interesting question because you're acknowledging that it does work , but why does it work? Is this just something that they pulled out of the seat-of-the-pants or has there been conscious decision-making about it? I trust that you as the leader of an organization can smell BS. That's the most important factor here.

8. Who are your enemies and how did you make them? This is a new favorite question of mine for leadership interviews. I learned it from someone I'm coaching who is a COO candidate and someone asked of him. I love this question because leaders usually make enemies along the way; you want them to be self-aware enough to notice them. You don't want them to say, " I have no enemies. Everybody loves me. I'm like a good puppy.. Everybody loves me."Everybody makes enemies.Someone has to be prepared to divulge that so you know that there are honest.

9. What professional accomplishments are you most proud of and why? This is a softball question. If they can't answer that one with a big smile on their face, there's something wrong here.

10. (Notice I built up through some challenging questions and then throw in a softball. Now this 1) What is the hardest criticism you've heard over the course of your management career ( or your leadership/Executive career)? This is an opportunity for the person to be self-aware in front of you; they have a chance to talk about their successes and mistakes..You want to hear about the mistakes and flush them outBut you also want to get a sense of the character of the individual here in order to find out whether they can be trusted with the keys to your organizational "car."

Most people this level have a great propensity for preparation and the ability to present things in cogent ways. Questions 7, 8 and 10 are designed to be personally revealing. You'll learn a lot from their answers but they are set up by the others.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL TODAY

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.