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​Are You Acting Like an Adult Elephant?

Are You Acting Like an Adult Elephant? | NoBSCoachingAdvice.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter uses the story of how baby and adult elephants are trained to encourage you.

Summary

The question that I'm going to ask you is, "Are you an adult elephant?" Let me explain the context.
When they train baby elephants, the baby elephant is absolutely wild and berserk, just like a young child is. So, what they do is they drive a stake deep into the ground, put a chain on it, chain the baby elephant around its foot, and the baby elephant eventually learns to be compliant.
Let's fast forward and we ask you the question, "how do you train an adult elephant?" Answer. You drive a small stake into the ground, not too far because it isn't necessary. You take a rope, tie it around the adult elephant's foot and the adult elephant remembers and never tries to break
Alright, so I asked you, are you an adult elephant? Are you basically taking other people's commands because you become facile and compliant? Is that what you are doing?
It's time to be a little bit freer in life? What's at risk for you to break that chain and explode and be magnificent? It's not like you're really going to lose your job because it's not like I'm inviting you to take out an Uzi or anything. I'm asking it to be magnificent in your work. And,, if your firm can't tolerate it, to get to an organization that would love you just the way you really are, not the way that you've been trained to be by the elephant trainer.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked in recruiting for what seems like one hundred years. He is the head coach for NoBSCoachingAdvice.com. He is the host of “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast,” and “No BS Job Search Advice.”

Are you interested in my coaching you? Connect with me on LinkedIn and, once we are connected, message me. If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Subscribe to the “The No BS Coaching Advice Podcast.”

No BS Coaching Advice
No BS Coaching Advice

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) https://thebiggamehunter.us/magnifi or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Connect with Me on LinkedIn 

For more No BS Coaching Advice, visit my website. www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

JobSearchTV.com

Clues That It’s Time to Change Jobs | JobSearchTV.com


Here are a few signals that you can read that tell you it’s time to change jobs.

Summary

This is a video about knowing when it's time to go. I'll simply say that a lot of this . . . I wish I had a turban on and this was a crystal ball . . . Oooooo. I could be looking into the crystal ball . . . Because, I've said many times the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those are great qualities to have). People get ahead by being alert to opportunity. Sometimes, those are internal to an organization; more often than not, they're external.
Now, one of the ways people do well professionally is by avoiding a professional disaster and being alert to signals. They can read tea leaves. That's what this was all about; you know, looking into the crystal ball or got a cup and use a tea bag, but yeah, you get the idea. So here's a couple of things that can help you recognize when you might be in jeopardy.
The first one is you suddenly report to someone different. If you're a senior professional, the reporting structures change and you're now reporting a rung or two down from where you were reporting. If you're on staff, you're suddenly re-assigned without even the pep talk about this being a great opportunity. Yeah, they really don't care about you. It's time to go.
Maybe, you recognize that you've gone as high as you can within the organization. You see your manager as someone who's around your age and is content with their job. When you ask yourself the question, "Where can I really go from here?" You know, your answer suggests improving your skills, rather than your job function because you're stuck behind this person. Maybe your firm is up for sale or recently sold.
I was talking with someone. Not too long ago, his firm was sold to a European concern. He recognized that what he has been asked to do was transition their computer systems and migrate them into formats that were familiar to the new employer. He understood that, at best, he would be asked to maintain them, but, certainly, there was no need for him once the the conversion was complete.
Another thing that you can do is look around and basically say there's nothing new going on around here. I'm doing the same thing I was three years ago. I'm just maintaining an existing function. Nothing new.
Or maybe you find your boss is a jerk or the industry that you're working in is on its deathbed. These are all clues it's time to move on.
So often, because people are kind of stuck in either the comfort of doing what they're doing or their concerns concerned about, "Can I really find a new position?" They wait until it's too late, and, thus, you know, put themselves in the position of being behind the professional 8-ball in the job search. It takes way longer. Without income, much longer. Because if you take action before they hand you the pink slip, yeah, you've built up some momentum already. . . And then you're out the door. And maybe you're close to another offer already.
So, don't wait until you are invited into that conference room with HR is and your manager and his or her manager and they slide that piece of paper in front of you to sign indicating that you understand that these are the circumstances of you termination.
Read the tea leaves. The proactive. Don't act fearfully because, at the end of the day, your fear is the very thing that's going to cost you dearly

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews,

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Deciding to Change Jobs

Deciding to Change Jobs | TheBigGameHunterTV


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what you should do once you decide to change jobs.

Summary

Today, let's talk about the decision to change jobs and considering why you want to change jobs. You are listening to this show like others have because you're wondering whether it's the right thing to do. It probably is.  But their are some exceptions to consider.

If there are some financial reasons why you really should stay. For example, you have some kind of loan from your current employer that you would have to we pay immediately if you resign your job and you can't afford to do so.
If you have a mediocre job history. You don't want that job history to be emphasized yet again.  If you change jobs.
Generally, if you're listening to the show, there is something unsettling about your current job situation that you need to address. Maybe, your boss is an imbecile. Maybe you stop learning a while ago.  Whatever it is, it's time to go.

Now, I want you to get clear about what the problems are, write them down, because what will happen is, in the course of your job search, You will forget some of these things and, later on, have to make a decision.  Sometimes, you will have to contend with a counteroffer where an employer is going to go, "But why?  We love you!  You are so important to us!  Please stay! Don't go!  We need you! How much is it going to take? "

Obviously, I am caricaturing what will be said to you, but sometimes people forget what is in their interest and get "bought" back to their current job and nothing is really changed.

So, write down your reasons for wanting to leave.  That's a great starting place for beginning your search.  If you flip your answers around and start looking at what you will need to have from you next employer, you'll find some things you will need to evaluate and consider when you interview.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Should I Stay Underemployed for At Least a Year So I Don’t Damage My Resume? | JobSearchTV.com


The details are sad. The answer isn’t.

Summary

Someone wrote to me with the question. "Should I stay in a job where I am underemployed for at least a year if I don't want to damage my resume?"

Here's the extra detail – – "I am 40 and I am earning $14 an hour in a job as a social media manager for a small company on Long Island. I'm being told I need to stay in his job for at least a year before I start looking for a better job. The position is an unchallenging dead-end with no advancement opportunities. Why should I stay?"

The simple answer is that there is no reason that you should stay. The "however" is I'm wondering whether you have the actual skills and experience yet to command more money. After all, why didn't you get a job paying more than $14 an hour if you have those skills and experiences?

Through question becomes how can you get them? If it is not at your current job, where can you get them? What training can you get? What can you do on the side to beef up your capabilities? To me, it's not about staying there for a year. That's the kind of crap that agencies tell job hunters that no longer applies.

What really matters is why was it necessary to take a $14 an hour job doing this at a firm with a dead-end? Why were you unable to get something better?

Usually, there are 2 reasons. One reason is lack of skills. The 2nd reason is lack of job search skills. That is what JobSearchCoachingHQ.com it is about. You can visit the site and get a sense of how I help people. There, you can get one-on-one coaching so that you're not just simply learning through trial and error and getting stuck. At least, the job-search side of this can be handled.

I can't help you become excellent at what you will careers. I can help you with your job search.

Again, there's no reason to stay. However, there may be reasons why you got stuck in this role then makes sense to look at. There are things that you can do to correct them. To me, it is not about the company; is really about you at this point. There are things you can do to get stronger, both in terms of your career and in terms of your job search skills.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

what are you tolerating?

What Are You Tolerating? | NoBSCoachingAdvice.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to take notes of the things you tolerate at work so that when your current firm makes a counteroffer you can decide whether it is worthwhile to accept.

Summary

I was doing a coaching call yesterday with someone and we got to a point in our conversation where he said something wonderful. What he said (and I think it is very relevant for you as a job hunter), he asked himself the question, "What am I tolerating?" I asked the question of you-- What are you tolerating? What are you putting up with, what was he putting up with, what was he putting up with in his current job that he knew he didn't like, but you just grown so numb to it where he grew to tolerate the condition?

For you as a job hunter, particularly when you get to the counteroffer phase or the resignation phase, which may lead to the counteroffer, it is important for you to be conscious of the things that you are putting up with work that just really don't serve you. That's because when you get to the point when you resign and your employer says, "What is it going to take? What is it going to take to keep you," and they start selling you about the money, is not just the money that is been driving you out the door. It is the things that you been putting up with for the longest time there really forcing you to look at other choices.

So, again, write down the things that you are tolerating, the things that you're putting up with that you really don't care for were there making you emotionally numb rather than conscious and passionate and loving everything about your work.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Asking Your Manager if Your Job Is Safe


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice for people who are worried about their jobs.

Summary

I'm going to talk with you today about those times in your career when you are hearing about the potential for layoffs.

Often, when John Hunter started thinking about job hunting, it's because there are some rumors going on in their offices. They are hearing "stuff." There is the grapevine going on. There are going to be job cuts occurring. Suddenly, people start talking to one another. It becomes a situation of the blind leading the blind.

Sometimes, there is the brave soul who has the courage to talk to their boss or manager. They asked them, "Hey! It is my job safe? Do I have anything to worry about? What do you think?"

95 times out of 100, what the manager tells them, "There is nothing to worry about. You are very important to us. Really. Don't worry about it."

When you stop and think about it, that manager doesn't know anything more than the subordinate does is coming to talk to them. That manager is so far down the ladder on a low wrong that all they are trying to do is hold that employee in place. They don't have any more information that the employee does.

Let's stop kidding ourselves. Let's start by analyzing.

Frankly, if you have reason to worry, there is a bigger problem that is going on. Your firm is struggling. You are reading about it in the press. Everyone is cutting back on jobs. Why would you put up with that?

Instead of waiting passively to see if the shoe will drop, put yourself in the position to be found. Put yourself in the position where your profile is up to date on LinkedIn where you might have your resume on a job order two. Where you are starting to network with some people, maybe a former manager of yours who is at another organization that may be in better shape than yours.

Connect with them. Talk with them. Get a feel from them about what's going on at their office. Maybe, there is a place for you at their firm.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Deciding to Change Jobs – No BS Job Search Advice

 

decidingJeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what you should do once you decide to change jobs.

 

Summary

Today, let's talk about the decision to change jobs and considering why you want to change jobs. You are listening to this show like others have because you're wondering whether it's the right thing to do. It probably is.  But their are some exceptions to consider.

If there are some financial reasons why you really should stay. For example, you have some kind of loan from your current employer that you would have to we pay immediately if you resign your job and you can't afford to do so.
If you have a mediocre job history. You don't want that job history to be emphasized yet again.  If you change jobs.
Generally, if you're listening to the show, there is something unsettling about your current job situation that you need to address. Maybe, your boss is an imbecile. Maybe you stop learning a while ago.  Whatever it is, it's time to go.

Now, I want you to get clear about what the problems are, write them down, because what will happen is, in the course of your job search, You will forget some of these things and, later on, have to make a decision.  Sometimes, you will have to contend with a counteroffer where an employer is going to go, "But why?  We love you!  You are so important to us!  Please stay! Don't go!  We need you! How much is it going to take? "

Obviously, I am caricaturing what will be said to you, but sometimes people forget what is in their interest and get "bought" back to their current job and nothing is really changed.

So, write down your reasons for wanting to leave.  That's a great starting place for beginning your search.  If you flip your answers around and start looking at what you will need to have from you next employer, you'll find some things you will need to evaluate and consider when you interview.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Why Are You Putting Up With It?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter draws from his own experience to talk about the decision to change jobs.

Summary

I want to talk with you about the decision to change jobs and draw upon my own experience. On two occasions in my career, I was working for organizations for 10 years or more. I was clearly entrenched in these organizations, very comfortable despite some of the nonsense that existed there.

We all know every organization has nonsense – – people of personalities, they have moods. You live with them for a long period of time and some of those times of frustrating.

In the most recent instance, I was associated with the firm for more than a dozen years and no matter what I did, the matter what I said, there was a lengthy period of time I was hitting my head against the wall in frustration. Still the idea of changing jobs didn't come to mind.

It one more instance (the details aren't important) for my wife to interrupt me one day and ask, "Have you thought about changing jobs at all?" Ultimately, I decided to start my own firm

Sometimes, you just have to listen to what someone else tells you or ask you and pause and ask yourself a question, "Why not?" What's keeping you there? What's so good about this situation that you want to go through all the frustration you go through?

I've been in sales for a long time and much of my income comes from commission. For those of you were not in sales, is it worth the salary that you are getting to experience all the frustration that you're going through?

Why are you accepting this? Who are you trying to please in all of this?

When all is said and done, ultimately, let them make the right decision for yourself. However, if you are noticing that there are more days than not when you are referring to things that can best be described as "nonsense," when no matter how are in Africa making success is not available to you, sometimes that's because the market that you're serving, sometimes that's because the systems that your operating (i.e. the company rules and regulations that get in the way of you obtaining the success that you want), why are you putting up with it?

My encouragement to you is to stop for a second and think or have an ally available because (like in my case, my wife) who, in a very simple way, asked "Have you thought about changing jobs yet?"

Then, think about it. Why not? Why not change jobs? Why tolerate the mediocrity of your current situation, your lack of contentment and happiness that comes with your current role?

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Deciding to Change Jobs

 

In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what you should do once you decide to change jobs.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

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