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JobSearchTV.com

Working with Recruiters


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers advice to you about working with recruiters.

Summary

Today, I want to offer you some No BS Job Search Advice about working with recruiters. Now, many of you have very unrealistic expectations of what a recruiter going to be able to for you.
I want to take the mythology out of it. Recruiters aren't there to find you a job. Recruiters in there to fill jobs that their clients need to have filled and then get paid for their work. You are the collateral requirement to be able to do that. However, they're going to find the job for you once . . . maybe. They're hoping to have a relationship with this client where they're filling lots of jobs.
Now, from your vantage point, there are a couple of different things you have to pay attention to. One is if you're sending an unsolicited resume to them, why would you expect that they're going to call you? They may not have anything for you. You are just sending spam to them. So that's point number one.
Point number two is when you send your resume, make the resume demonstrate the fit in a way that's obvious. All recruiters are overwhelmed with resumes these days, because it's so easy for you to send them out. Most of what we get is garbage. It's garbage because they in no way shape or form demonstrates a fit for the position you think you're qualified for. You're wasting our time. So, the second point is tailor your resume for every job that you submit it to. Every resume that you submit to a recruiter, use a cover letter emphasizing some of those points.
Now, I don't mean attaching an extra file there. The extra file isn't going to be read. But using the mess age area of the email to call attention to the fit that your resume is also going to display goes a long way toward getting a recruiter's attention.
Number three is, yes, they're trying to help you find the position. But more importantly, they're trying to fill the requirement at a client. They don't want to get yelled at by the client. Take their coaching. They know these situations better than you do. And they know this client.I have to say hopefully because you may be talking to the junior recruiter, and the senior's really the one who knows the client well. Get to the person who's the account manager in order to ensure that you're getting the best coaching before each interview.
Finally, when it comes time to salary negotiations, they're in an awkward position. The client is telling them how much they're willing to pay. They're trying to drive you to that number. Make sure that if you're getting a signal that that number that you're looking for, isn't going to be met by the client, halt the process somewhere.
Now, I'm not saying yell and scream, I want to be clear about that. But halt the process and just make sure that the numbers that you're talking about are numbers that can be met later on. Otherwise, you're going to waste a lot of time interviewing for something pointless that's going to result in you turning down the offer.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Working With a Recruiter | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/11/02/working-with-a-recruiter-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1274 People have silly ideas about recruiters and what they do. Let me clear things up.

Summary

Let me just talk with you for a 2nd about the role of recruiters in your job search and some of the mistakes people make when they start working with recruiters – – mistakes in attitude, mistakes that come with misunderstanding the role.

The language of job hunters is, "I'm going to contact recruiter and they are going to help me find the job."  Or, " I'm going to contact a bunch of recruiters and they will help me find a job."

Wrong.

That's not the case.  

Recruiters are hired by organizations and paid to find people who fill a job that is open.

"But they need me for this!"

You are absolutely right, but you are a commodity.  I want you to hear that again.  If you think you are the only person in your market area who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  If you think you're the only person in the country who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  Recruiters are paid by corporations to find people with specific talent, specific backgrounds that can do the role.  They are not there to help you transition 99.9% of the time.

They are not there to be career coaches.  They are not there to respond to your messages when you when you send a resume that says, "Hey, what do you think?"

Give me a break. You are stealing time from them.  You think they are going to critique your resume for you… I have this happen to me all the time.  People send me a message that says, "Take a look at my resume.  Please do a rewrite for me."  Andy, they don't want to pay me anything for it.  Help me understand why I'm supposed to do this.

"Because we will build a relationship!"'  Sure.  I never heard from you before, and I'll never hear from you again.  That's my experience. And I've only done this for 40 years.

Recruiters are there to fill jobs by finding people who have specific backgrounds and match certain preferences that an organization has and are paid as a result of finding this correct person.

Recruiters Aren't Rude

The next thing that people make this goofy association with is that recruiters are rude and unresponsive.  Many times, you are a spammer.  You are sending resumes to a cruise that in no way, shape or form does your background for what they are looking for a you are expecting them to STOP, say, "Okay, I'm going to call this guy, even though I will never have anything for them," or STOP and say to ourselves, "This 1 woman wants to make a transition into a completely different field, and she has no background in this whatsoever but she wants to do it.  Let me call her."

I think the witness really comes from the fact that you're contacting them and have expectations that are unreasonable.

Recognize that when you tried to steal someone's time, the result winds up being that you are the weird one because you are making demands of them that are completely unreasonable.  The next thing is that recruiters are not held to get the best compensation that they can.  The truth of the matter is, the recruiter wants to do the deal.

Let me repeat that.  The recruiter wants to do the deal.  The one that the recruiter wants to do is the one that the client is willing that to pay them to do in order to deliver a candid.  For example, if you are offered $60,000 or $100,000 or $250,000, and you are looking for $67.5 or $110 or $275, you may think they are trying to scam you hear but the reality is, the client will pay anymore for you.  They will be paid anything. If they don't deliver you to them.  So, they will try to deliver you, they will try to be persuasive about why your value is not as high as you think it is.

Hopefully, you did research at the beginning of the search (You did that, didn't you?  Most people don't, let's not kid ourselves.  You probably didn't do research at the beginning of your search, other than to ask friends or family who have no real knowledge).  For you, as a job hunter, you need to understand your value and, because you want it, it doesn't mean you have that value.

If the market is rejecting you and you have been on a bunch of interviews, with no offers, and no callbacks him him, and no interest, the market is telling you that you are not as good as you think you are and you don't have the value that you think you have.  Recognize this and you have to be the one that adapts.

Or, be prepared to turn down an offer and go on to the next thing which is perfectly fine.  However, understand that the recruiter was there to do the deal.

Lastly, recruiters care about building long-term relationships with people.  They want to help them become hiring managers and higher from them.  That is really where they make more money.  From your vantage point, you may think they are transactional, but that is because you have been a spammer most of the time.  You have been submitting resume after resume after resume that doesn't fit what they're looking for, wondering why you don't get a phone call.

Try Walking in a Recruiter's Shoes Sometime

If you think I'm wrong. Folks, you have to live on my side of the desk; I walk in on a typical day to 150 to 200 emails plus messages in my LinkedIn inbox and clients that want feedback on interviews that have taken place.  It is job hunters that send resumes with very specific requirements  (When I run a ads, I try to make it crystal clear what my client is looking for) at submit resumes that aren't even close, not even in the same industry – – like the IT security role with risk management background applied to by the security guard.  If the person took 1 2nd to read the job description, you wouldn't apply but you still my time.

So, again, often the issue with job hunters, isn't the recruiter.  It's you.  You are the problem here.  Your behavior sets up this adversarial relationship. I know you don't want to hear it, but I'm here to give you no BS job search advice, even if it makes you squirm.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV

Your Biggest Mistake Working With Recruiters | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out the biggest mistake job hunters make when they think about working with recruiters.

Summary

Today, I want talk with you about your expectations of working with a recruiter and point out to you that they may be out of whack.

Most people have the mistaken notion that a recruiter works for them. That is the job hunter you're in charge and the recruiter is working for you. That’s partially right. To understand who are recruiter works for, ask yourself how much are you paying them? Seriously, how much you paying them? Nothing. Who's paying the recruiter? The employer. Do you think a recruiter is going to go out once they have your resume and knock on thousands of doors until they find a job for you?

No. That's a working for you really means. It means that they are out there trying to find a job for you; in point of fact, since employers are paying recruiters, they’re working for the employer and what they're trying to do more often than not is finesse you into the square box that the employer has defined in terms of job, in terms of compensation, in terms of role and responsibilities . . . Every step along the line. If you don't fit that box, you're not on their radar screen.

When they get a job, when they find the job the fits you, have no fear period They will get back in touch. But understand, they are not working for you. They’re really working for the employer.

Now, I also don’t want to ignore the fact that, ultimately, they have to listen to you and work with your constructs and your needs, wants and desires in order to fill a position. But, if you think your number one, in their book, you are very confused because, ultimately, as is in your life, the person who pays you is the one to whom the loyalty exists.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Working With a Recruiter | JobSearchTV.com


People have silly ideas about recruiters and what they do. Let me clear things up.

Summary

Let me just talk with you for a 2nd about the role of recruiters in your job search and some of the mistakes people make when they start working with recruiters – – mistakes in attitude, mistakes that come with misunderstanding the role.

The language of job hunters is, "I'm going to contact recruiter and they are going to help me find the job."  Or, " I'm going to contact a bunch of recruiters and they will help me find a job."

Wrong.

That's not the case.  

Recruiters are hired by organizations and paid to find people who fill a job that is open.

"But they need me for this!"

You are absolutely right, but you are a commodity.  I want you to hear that again.  If you think you are the only person in your market area who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  If you think you're the only person in the country who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  Recruiters are paid by corporations to find people with specific talent, specific backgrounds that can do the role.  They are not there to help you transition 99.9% of the time.

They are not there to be career coaches.  They are not there to respond to your messages when you when you send a resume that says, "Hey, what do you think?"

Give me a break. You are stealing time from them.  You think they are going to critique your resume for you… I have this happen to me all the time.  People send me a message that says, "Take a look at my resume.  Please do a rewrite for me."  Andy, they don't want to pay me anything for it.  Help me understand why I'm supposed to do this.

"Because we will build a relationship!"'  Sure.  I never heard from you before, and I'll never hear from you again.  That's my experience. And I've only done this for 40 years.

Recruiters are there to fill jobs by finding people who have specific backgrounds and match certain preferences that an organization has and are paid as a result of finding this correct person.

Recruiters Aren't Rude

The next thing that people make this goofy association with is that recruiters are rude and unresponsive.  Many times, you are a spammer.  You are sending resumes to a cruise that in no way, shape or form does your background for what they are looking for a you are expecting them to STOP, say, "Okay, I'm going to call this guy, even though I will never have anything for them," or STOP and say to ourselves, "This 1 woman wants to make a transition into a completely different field, and she has no background in this whatsoever but she wants to do it.  Let me call her."

I think the witness really comes from the fact that you're contacting them and have expectations that are unreasonable.

Recognize that when you tried to steal someone's time, the result winds up being that you are the weird one because you are making demands of them that are completely unreasonable.  The next thing is that recruiters are not held to get the best compensation that they can.  The truth of the matter is, the recruiter wants to do the deal.

Let me repeat that.  The recruiter wants to do the deal.  The one that the recruiter wants to do is the one that the client is willing that to pay them to do in order to deliver a candid.  For example, if you are offered $60,000 or $100,000 or $250,000, and you are looking for $67.5 or $110 or $275, you may think they are trying to scam you hear but the reality is, the client will pay anymore for you.  They will be paid anything. If they don't deliver you to them.  So, they will try to deliver you, they will try to be persuasive about why your value is not as high as you think it is.

Hopefully, you did research at the beginning of the search (You did that, didn't you?  Most people don't, let's not kid ourselves.  You probably didn't do research at the beginning of your search, other than to ask friends or family who have no real knowledge).  For you, as a job hunter, you need to understand your value and, because you want it, it doesn't mean you have that value.

If the market is rejecting you and you have been on a bunch of interviews, with no offers, and no callbacks him him, and no interest, the market is telling you that you are not as good as you think you are and you don't have the value that you think you have.  Recognize this and you have to be the one that adapts.

Or, be prepared to turn down an offer and go on to the next thing which is perfectly fine.  However, understand that the recruiter was there to do the deal.

Lastly, recruiters care about building long-term relationships with people.  They want to help them become hiring managers and higher from them.  That is really where they make more money.  From your vantage point, you may think they are transactional, but that is because you have been a spammer most of the time.  You have been submitting resume after resume after resume that doesn't fit what they're looking for, wondering why you don't get a phone call.

Try Walking in a Recruiter's Shoes Sometime

If you think I'm wrong. Folks, you have to live on my side of the desk; I walk in on a typical day to 150 to 200 emails plus messages in my LinkedIn inbox and clients that want feedback on interviews that have taken place.  It is job hunters that send resumes with very specific requirements  (When I run a ads, I try to make it crystal clear what my client is looking for) at submit resumes that aren't even close, not even in the same industry – – like the IT security role with risk management background applied to by the security guard.  If the person took 1 2nd to read the job description, you wouldn't apply but you still my time.

So, again, often the issue with job hunters, isn't the recruiter.  It's you.  You are the problem here.  Your behavior sets up this adversarial relationship. I know you don't want to hear it, but I'm here to give you no BS job search advice, even if it makes you squirm.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

What Do I Do? I Lost My Dream Job Due to the Unprofessional Behavior of the Recruiter | JobSearchTV.com


Here is my no BS answer this question.

Summary

"What should I do when I lose my dream opportunity because of the unprofessional behavior of the recruiter?"

Recruiters are the bogeyman for a lot of job hunters. And, I must also say, to a lot of corporations. They are blamed for far more than what they are deserved to be blamed for. Since I don't have any details here (I just have the question (I don't have any texture or nuance to what happened and what the recruiter is alleged to have done), I will simply go with what this person suggesting me , which is the person didn't get the job, they wanted the recruiter to do or say something for them and they wouldn't. They deem that to be unprofessional.

You know, maybe I'm wrong here , but most of the time, almost all the time, when job hunters lose a position, even when the recruiter is obnoxious and creepy and incompetent, employers will find a way to hire the person. What they will do is call of the recruiter and say, "Look, back down. You have 2 choices here. We are going to run the hire. Get out of the way and if we actually hire this person, will write you a check when it's all over. The other choice is that you can lose the fee and we won't just talk to the person at all. "

The fact of the matter is, when given those 2 choices the recruiter will say, "You'll do all the work? Just keep me informed. Let me know where to send the invoice to when you hire them and I'll be happy to collect the money. I'm sorry you don't like me. Tell me what I can do differently and I will do it because I want you to like me."

That's the way recruiters conduct themselves, even if they don't use those words. They want to make money. They don't want to lose if the because of bad behavior on their part or yours. Job hunters are more likely to cost recruiters opportunities through bad behavior. Firms start to evaluate recruiters based upon the behavior of job hunters and decide, "you know, this recruiter doesn't do a good enough job screening for us; were going to stop using them."

That's a very likely occurrence. In this 1, here's. What probably happened. You are not qualified to get the job. Your resume stank. You didn't get in the door. Or, if you did, you did not perform. You want to blame the recruiter for that. But, no, it is you that is at issue.. You are the one that failed. The client isn't interested. The recruiter cannot perform telephone or Skype hypnosis to make them do something that they don't want to do. You are angry at the recruiter because they couldn't make it happen.

I could be wrong. I don't think I am. I say that because of the situations where people have complained about me. My client made decisions that they thought were in their best interests. And, you know, you can't persuade people to do things that they don't want to do any more than you are persuadable to buy a car that is more than you can afford or buy a house where you cannot afford to make the 1st mortgage payment. You are not stupid, and neither are they.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Working With a Recruiter | Job Search Radio

People have silly ideas about recruiters and what they do. Let me clear things up.

recruiter-sticking-tongue-out

Summary

Let me just talk with you for a 2nd about the role of recruiters in your job search and some of the mistakes people make when they start working with recruiters – – mistakes in attitude, mistakes that come with misunderstanding the role.

The language of job hunters is, "I'm going to contact recruiter and they are going to help me find the job."  Or, " I'm going to contact a bunch of recruiters and they will help me find a job."

Wrong.

That's not the case.  

Recruiters are hired by organizations and paid to find people who fill a job that is open.

"But they need me for this!"

You are absolutely right, but you are a commodity.  I want you to hear that again.  If you think you are the only person in your market area who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  If you think you're the only person in the country who can do this job, you are deluding yourself.  Recruiters are paid by corporations to find people with specific talent, specific backgrounds that can do the role.  They are not there to help you transition 99.9% of the time.

They are not there to be career coaches.  They are not there to respond to your messages when you when you send a resume that says, "Hey, what do you think?"

Give me a break. You are stealing time from them.  You think they are going to critique your resume for you… I have this happen to me all the time.  People send me a message that says, "Take a look at my resume.  Please do a rewrite for me."  Andy, they don't want to pay me anything for it.  Help me understand why I'm supposed to do this.

"Because we will build a relationship!"'  Sure.  I never heard from you before, and I'll never hear from you again.  That's my experience. And I've only done this for 40 years.

Recruiters are there to fill jobs by finding people who have specific backgrounds and match certain preferences that an organization has and are paid as a result of finding this correct person.

Recruiters Aren't Rude

The next thing that people make this goofy association with is that recruiters are rude and unresponsive.  Many times, you are a spammer.  You are sending resumes to a cruise that in no way, shape or form does your background for what they are looking for a you are expecting them to STOP, say, "Okay, I'm going to call this guy, even though I will never have anything for them," or STOP and say to ourselves, "This 1 woman wants to make a transition into a completely different field, and she has no background in this whatsoever but she wants to do it.  Let me call her."

I think the witness really comes from the fact that you're contacting them and have expectations that are unreasonable.

Recognize that when you tried to steal someone's time, the result winds up being that you are the weird one because you are making demands of them that are completely unreasonable.  The next thing is that recruiters are not held to get the best compensation that they can.  The truth of the matter is, the recruiter wants to do the deal.

Let me repeat that.  The recruiter wants to do the deal.  The one that the recruiter wants to do is the one that the client is willing that to pay them to do in order to deliver a candid.  For example, if you are offered $60,000 or $100,000 or $250,000, and you are looking for $67.5 or $110 or $275, you may think they are trying to scam you hear but the reality is, the client will pay anymore for you.  They will be paid anything. If they don't deliver you to them.  So, they will try to deliver you, they will try to be persuasive about why your value is not as high as you think it is.

Hopefully, you did research at the beginning of the search (You did that, didn't you?  Most people don't, let's not kid ourselves.  You probably didn't do research at the beginning of your search, other than to ask friends or family who have no real knowledge).  For you, as a job hunter, you need to understand your value and, because you want it, it doesn't mean you have that value.

If the market is rejecting you and you have been on a bunch of interviews, with no offers, and no callbacks him him, and no interest, the market is telling you that you are not as good as you think you are and you don't have the value that you think you have.  Recognize this and you have to be the one that adapts.

Or, be prepared to turn down an offer and go on to the next thing which is perfectly fine.  However, understand that the recruiter was there to do the deal.

Lastly, recruiters care about building long-term relationships with people.  They want to help them become hiring managers and higher from them.  That is really where they make more money.  From your vantage point, you may think they are transactional, but that is because you have been a spammer most of the time.  You have been submitting resume after resume after resume that doesn't fit what they're looking for, wondering why you don't get a phone call.

Try Walking in a Recruiter's Shoes Sometime

If you think I'm wrong. Folks, you have to live on my side of the desk; I walk in on a typical day to 150 to 200 emails plus messages in my LinkedIn inbox and clients that want feedback on interviews that have taken place.  It is job hunters that send resumes with very specific requirements  (When I run a ads, I try to make it crystal clear what my client is looking for) at submit resumes that aren't even close, not even in the same industry – – like the IT security role with risk management background applied to by the security guard.  If the person took 1 2nd to read the job description, you wouldn't apply but you still my time.

So, again, often the issue with job hunters, isn't the recruiter.  It's you.  You are the problem here.  Your behavior sets up this adversarial relationship. I know you don't want to hear it, but I'm here to give you no BS job search advice, even if it makes you squirm.

 

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Please give “Job Search Radio” a great review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show and makes me happy!

Should I Email a Recruiter Who Missed an Interview With Me?


I am not sure if I should call them or let it slide and wait for them to call.

 

Summary

SUMMARY

The question for today you should I email the recruiter who missed the call with me today?

Let me turn the question around; if you missed the call with them, do you think they would’ve called you?

Hell yeah! They would’ve called you and probably put you on the defensive. And you can’t do that. You have to be bigger than that. A corporate recruiter might do it and expect to get an advantage from you later on.

With recruiters, you have to take it on the chin a little bit and say something like, “we were scheduled to speak at 230.”

To me, I would give them 10 minutes of grace time before calling them; I wouldn’t delay major lengths of time.

Why?

Because of is only 10 minutes, you probably have enough time to do the entire interview they would have done and not have to reschedule it.

They may feel inhibited or defensive if they get an email from you.

Your job is to get the interview and deliver on it. It is not to be in power or look for advantage where you push them around. All that happens if you try to push them around is that you will be rejected.

At the end of the day what you want to be accomplishing is really very simple. You want the in person interview.

If this were to happen during the in-person interview, I would go over to the receptionist and say something like, “I had a [2:30] PM appointment with Jenny. She seems to be running very late. Would you mind checking with her?”  I do this at doctors offices when I walk in.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter