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Asking for More Money | JobSearchTV


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers eight simple to follow ways for you to ask for more money.

Summary

If you have watch my videos on salary negotiation, I try to cover a whole range of different options from the hardball to the softball. The show goes into the softer category which, frankly, I prefer for most of you because I don't think most of you can be hardball negotiators. In sales, it's different. There, I'm going to push you to be a tough negotiator because that is part of what they will be measuring you for. For most of you, however, softball, the gentle approach, not getting into arguments and confrontations, but presenting this as an "ask," and not a demand is far more effective.

When you get the offer, here is how you respond.

"WOW! That's terrific! Thank you so much. I'm so excited! But I must in all candor tell you that I love this firm the opportunity, but I have several other offers at the same salary level or in the same range." Then you shut up because the next thing that they're going to follow up with is, "So what do you plan on doing?"

"I need to sit with this a little bit. I'm hoping you could do a bit better to match my highest offer."

Understand that for most organizations, a 5 or $10,000 improvement is not going to break the bank. Even if they move by $2000. That's money in your pocket, not theirs, right? You don't want to get into arguments. You don't want to get into confrontations. You want to make it seem like you are agonizing a little bit.

"I have other offers in the same area. I was hoping you could match my highest offer." Understand, on your side, you need to be prepared to talk with them about what the number is and once they match and you have to be prepared to say, "Yes." There is no back and forth you anymore. It is done.

Also, understand that 5 or $10,000 is okay. $30,000, unless you are an executive level is not in the same ballpark. It is considered a wide difference in most organizations and their budget approach.

Recognize the difference here. Then, if they just increased by a little bit, you can respond by going, "I need to think about it. Can I get back to you later in the week?" When you get back to them, "this has been so hard. Is there any progress that you can make? Any improvement you can make?"

They may respond by saying, "No, that's it." Or, "that's really the best that we can do." Then you need to be prepared to give an answer.

No matter what, the approach is just to very simply give them the idea that you want to say yes, but they need to improve the offer. Then, be quiet. It's really that simple.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Your Best Salary Negotiation Strategy | No BS Hiring Advice


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out what he believes is your best strategy for negotiating salary,

Summary

I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. I'm referred to as the Big Game Hunter because I've hunted own leaders and staff organizations from more than 40 years. I'm back with some more no BS hiring advice to help you do an even better job of recruiting and hiring people, whether your an HR professional ,hiring manager or small business owner.
So, the advice I have today is about salary negotiation and the simplest advice I want to offer you is don't offer your top number right away. Hold on to a few dollars from it– –$5,000 $10,000, whatever you think is appropriate depending upon the level of the job. So, this way the job hunter who believes that they can negotiate to get progress off of the original offer feels like they have a victory.
They feel good about themselves. They feel good that you cared enough to up the offer to get them. And it was already slotted into what you were planning for. And the other thing is some people will say, "yes." So, they're just very calmly say, "we're making you an offer. The offer is for such . . . " Justlike you would for any offer . . . But hold on to a few dollars from the offer and try to enter into a negotiation with them.
Don't say, "well,this is negotiable" . But just, very simply, extend the offer, see if they accept and then you have more money available in case you need to go a little bit higher.
So this is Jeff Altman. I hopeyou found this video helpful. If you did it, and you're watching on YouTube. Share it, leave a comment, click the like button – –do something that lets people know that this is worthwhile.
In addition, come over my website which is www.TheBigGameHunter.us and you can read articles of I curated from around the web,sign up for a complimentary subscription to No BS Coaching Advice Ezine, which I publish twice montthly. It has advice for HR professionals, hiring managers and small business owners to help you make even better staffing decisions. Go exploring on the website. This good content there. I hope you find it helpful.
If we aren't already connected on LinkedIn, send me a connection request at www.linkedin.com/in/TheBigGameHunter
This is Jeff Altman. Have a great day. Take care.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

 

JobSearchTV.com

Salary Negotiation Mistakes | JobSearchTV.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses Some of the mistakes job hunters make when negotiating their new salary.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about that most difficult of subjects for job hunters – – salary negotiation and some of the mistakes people make when they get to that phase of the interviewing where they are negotiating salary. I'm not talking about when and employer says, “So, how much he earning,” and you quote a number. I’m discussing the point where and employer’s ready to make an offer and they are trying to size you up for compensation. So, here a couple of mistakes that people make.

1, They don't negotiate at all. A firm puts out an offer, they go, “WOW1 THAT’S FABULOUS!!!’ You can always do a little bit better, even if you are excited by the offer. Now, I’m not talking about if they hit your number. You told them what you are looking for and they hit it. There, you just simply say, “thank you,” and accept the offer. I’m talking about they are a little off on the number or you haven't shared the number and they are just extending an offer. You just can't accept the first thing. Minimally, watch my video, “The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary” https://youtu.be/6P8AbomG5F4
You can always do a little bit better.

2. The except the first offer that is made to them. It’s like, “Here’s our offer.”

“Great! I’ll take it.”

Always try to do a little bit better.

3. Another thing people do is that they don’t get the offer in writing.

I remember, years ago, someone came to me and they were very upset and they are telling me their story and I’m going through their background and I could hear in their voice that they are being upset and, you know, the long and the short of the was that they received an offer orally but by the time it was put in writing it was a different number… or maybe they just misheard the number. No matter, you always have to get the offer in writing since that is your legal protection against shenanigans.

4. Another thing that people do is, frankly, you know, when the offer is made and it is not the right number, they take it personally.

“How dare you?? What's wrong with you?”

That is what goes through their mind. They don’t, necessarily, have to say it, but they get angry. The goofy situation is that people get angry because employers have a salary range. I’m going to work with simple numbers. Let's say it's 100- $110,000 per year and they offer $105.

“How dare you not offer may the max money!!

“Well, you didn't rank to that level,” or their formula doesn't allow them to extend to that level. Whatever the reason is they made a different offer. There are tactics that you can use (like I said, The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary” is another video I've done that is very popular on YouTube. You watch that technique for getting a slightly higher offer). However, the long and short of it is don’t take it personally.

It's like in “The Godfather.”

“It's business, it's not personal.”

They’re not trying to offend you and everyone's trying to save a buck these days and they are no different than you are.

So, grow up, man! Grow up, lady!

No, it’s not a personal thing. So, always try to do a little bit better yourself. Don't just accept the first thing that they offer. Always try to negotiate a little bit higher, even if you pleased, EXCEPT if they've hit the number that you asked them for. Then, you just say, “thank you,” and accept the offer.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Framing a Negotiation | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Framing a Negotiation | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 997 It seems that he or she who states the number first may not be losing.

Summary

This is 1 about negotiating. The classic belief that people have is that he or she who names the number 1st loses. I'll just say that that may not be true. The reason for that is really very simple.

There is a social psychology thought that has been proven that says that the one who frames the negotiation with a number 1st actually sets the tone for the conversation. If you think about employers and what they do, employers try to frame the negotiation by an increase on your current salary.. Job hunters always afraid to stick with you're looking for because they are going to leave money on the table.

Step number 1 is this is the reason why you really have to do research about what your value is. What is the market for what you do? What to firms pay for that? You start shooting at the very high level of that value or above. Why? Because when you are asked the salary that you are looking for, you always want to be at the top point were slightly above it. In this way, you can do the concession down work. Let me give you the social psychology example.

There is this guy named Dan Arielly who is done a ton of research in negotiate. You talk about this fascinating study he had done. It's very funny when you think about it, but use the example of being in a class, here's everyone the last 2 digits of their Social Security number. Some people have a 12; some people, the 95; some people have a 98; some people have a 41. They will have this number in mind..

From there, they bring out a product and they say, "We want you to make an offer on this product based upon whatever criteria you think is appropriate." Consistently, people start to think in terms of 1st and last 2 digits of your Social Security number and then coming is lower than that. The 98 people my come in at 86. The 14 people may coming at 9. The 44 people may coming in at 38. The number helped frame their thinking so they work offer that number, even though was completely irrelevant to what was being purchased and what its value was.

As a result, this is why you need to be thinking in terms of setting the market for what you do in relation to what you research the market is. Let me give you a simple example. You can't take a job that is valued at $50,000 per year and say, "I want $100,000 per year and negotiate from there.," That's because firms are just going to roll their eyes and walk away saying they are not interested because it is too big a discrepancy.

If you make $45,000 year, for example, in the market for what you do is $50,000 per year. If you ask for $53,000-$55,000 per year, there is wiggle room. There were they feel like they are getting a good deal by getting you down from there and you feel like you've gotten a good deal because you got them to the max number.

The old saw that he or she who names the number 1st loses may not be right AND,, yes, in some instances, you may be leaving money on the table but in most instances, you are not. That's because you know what the market is for what they are doing and you're working from that knowledge, not some pie-in-the-sky ephemeral number that you pulled out of the air. You're working for real information for what the value is for what you do in negotiating from there.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon

The Best Way to Research Salary at a Firm (VIDEO)


Everyone tells you to research your value but no one tells you how. In this video I discuss the best way to do your research.

Summary

Do you know how people always tell you that you have to research your value before you start looking for a job? No one ever tells you how. They just tell you that you have to find out what your value is that it never teaches a method of doing it. So I want to teach you from modern times the best way to do it.

Back in The Stone Ages when I started out in recruiting, you would look at newspaper ads particular positions and will start noticing the salary ranges. We start to take an average of the salaries and discover what your value is. A lot of ants however no longer includes salary. Recruiter ads do but sometimes those numbers a little bit exaggerated. because they are trying to draw people in and then talk them down.

Here's what I want to suggest in this is, truthfully, the best way that you can do it. Let's say you have an interview scheduled that a large banking firm. Get into LinkedIn, look at people who are doing, for example, programming for a similar application to the one that you're doing now (or for the kind of work that you're being interviewed for who work for that firm), using keyword searches, and then, reach out to them directly (don't go to LinkedIn).

Just call and simply say, "Hi! Is this so-and-so? My name is such and such and frankly I'm interviewing for position. I get 4 minutes of your time to pick your brain about something? How do you like working there? Do you like working there are you wrestling with some things?"

Most of the time to tell you it's a great experience. "Terrific! Could I trouble you to ask, because you know what I interviewed to ask the salary that I'm looking for and have reached out to a few people... I'm not can it tell you who... Just try to be polite and maintain their confidentiality, I'm just very simply asking whether it's a good environment to work in and give me an idea of the salary that they are earning so that in this way, I don't shoot to Holly or should too low."

You will get a little bit of pushback because in the US, most people are uncomfortable talking about salary. If more more people do it, it's going to become more and more of a common practice and take away the power employers have by having the only knowledge of what pay scales are. That's really the corporate advantage. Let me tell you a quick story.

Yesterday, on Facebook, there was a corporate recruiter who put out a message to third-party recruiters. He was facing a dilemma where he was interviewing someone who seemed good for job, but they just wouldn't say the salary; they just wouldn't give it up. He "punted" to the hiring manager with her notes about her lack of flexibility.

I commended the guy initially for not following the traditional line of just rejecting the person. I recognize that, from his vantage point, he feels like he is in a bind because his job is to bring on some of the lowest level possible and the person's job is to get the highest amount possible. When you're doing your research, you want to take note of the ranges that people are earning and what the differences are in the work that they do. Just because one person is making $95,000 and another one is making $125,000 doesn't mean that you are worth the $125,000.

Look at what they do versus what you are being asked to do and see how a firm might value it.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Asking for More Money


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/09/21/asking-for-more-money-2/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers eight simple to follow ways for you to ask for more money.

Summary

If you have watch my videos on salary negotiation, I try to cover a whole range of different options from the hardball to the softball. The show goes into the softer category which, frankly, I prefer for most of you because I don't think most of you can be hardball negotiators. In sales, it's different. There, I'm going to push you to be a tough negotiator because that is part of what they will be measuring you for. For most of you, however, softball, the gentle approach, not getting into arguments and confrontations, but presenting this as an "ask," and not a demand is far more effective.

When you get the offer, here is how you respond.

"WOW! That's terrific! Thank you so much. I'm so excited! But I must in all candor tell you that I love this firm the opportunity, but I have several other offers at the same salary level or in the same range." Then you shut up because the next thing that they're going to follow up with is, "So what do you plan on doing?"

"I need to sit with this a little bit. I'm hoping you could do a bit better to match my highest offer."

Understand that for most organizations, a 5 or $10,000 improvement is not going to break the bank. Even if they move by $2000. That's money in your pocket, not theirs, right? You don't want to get into arguments. You don't want to get into confrontations. You want to make it seem like you are agonizing a little bit.

"I have other offers in the same area. I was hoping you could match my highest offer." Understand, on your side, you need to be prepared to talk with them about what the number is and once they match and you have to be prepared to say, "Yes." There is no back and forth you anymore. It is done.

Also, understand that 5 or $10,000 is okay. $30,000, unless you are an executive level is not in the same ballpark. It is considered a wide difference in most organizations and their budget approach.

Recognize the difference here. Then, if they just increased by a little bit, you can respond by going, "I need to think about it. Can I get back to you later in the week?" When you get back to them, "this has been so hard. Is there any progress that you can make? Any improvement you can make?"

They may respond by saying, "No, that's it." Or, "that's really the best that we can do." Then you need to be prepared to give an answer.

No matter what, the approach is just to very simply give them the idea that you want to say yes, but they need to improve the offer. Then, be quiet. It's really that simple.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Email me at [email protected]
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line and tell me about your circumstances in the body of the email.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Salary Negotiation Advice For Executives (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers some basic negotiation advice for when you work with a recruiter.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Preparing and Practicing Your End Game


Finding a job is like a chess match where everyone spends time practicing their opening gambit but no time practicing their end game. In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to also spend time practicing and preparing your end game.

Summary

One thing I know about job hunters is that they focus all their attention on the opening. It's kind of like chess. You focus on your opening gambit but don't spend a lot of time practicing your endgame.

The opening gambit is writing the resume, how to interview, maybe, how to second interview.But you don't really but you don't really work on the parts of the game related to salary negotiation, maybe resigning her position in a good way so that you don't burn the bridges. Particularly salary negotiations a weak spot for most people.

The result winds up being you leave money on the table, maybe burn a bridge behind you with your current employer that makes it harder for you to get a great reference when you needed in the future.

And you know you're going to need it in the future, right? This job is going to last until the hinge of the gold watch, right? What their huge were gold watch.

When all is said and done, you need to spend some time practicing your endgame in salary negotiation, too. Getting advice about how to negotiate salary and how to resign your job well.

I have tons of videos on the subjects, but a video isn't that the same as spending time with an expert and learning how to do it well at the right time. Yes, I will coach you on how to do a salary negotiation. I provide that service. I'll prepare you for it, prepare you, even if they've made the offer to you and your trying to "finesse them" into upping the money. .. I can't work miracles , but I've helped a lot of people get more money in all the salary negotiations that I've done it all those coaching sessions I've done.

I'll simply say don't sell yourself short and don't take the shortcut that costs you money. Spend some time learning what you need to about your endgame and not just simply her opening. It really is like chess and, at the end of the day, don't sell yourself short and don't take the shortcut that costs you money. Spend some time learning what you need to about your endgame not just simply your opening.It really is like a chess match. Remember, if you leave yourself in a position where you are boxed in, iit will be hard to win.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself


Here, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple to follow advice for how to improve a salary offer that is lacking without you “stressing out.”

Summary

I want to talk with you today about negotiating compensation because it is probably 1 of the most under talked about aspects of the job search. The reason for that is pretty clear. the big boys, the big girls, when they are negotiating compensation have all sorts of ways to play the game.for the little guy, the small person you may be in a blue-collar job working for a small business where someone is paying them out of their own pocket...there is no negotiating there.the basic form of negotiation there is, "Were making you an offer. You have 2 choices. Leave it or take it."

Then there is the average person, perhaps a professional or white-collar worker, small or big company… It doesn't really matter. when offer comes in someone's trying to improve upon it, again, there are limited strategies for what you can do. again, the big boys and big girls have a pretty easy. they are all going to have big-time agents and they are not covered by the same rules. the average person is really stuck because, if you working for a public corporation, for example, they cannot really do side deals because they are subject to litigation. if they do a side deal with you (I will use myself as an example) for some additional benefit, they can be sued because, after all, why did they give it to this white guy and not give it to this individual who is not a white guy? Why did they give it to the heterosexual guy it not the gay guy? we live in a litigious society and that affects the way the negotiations done.

I want to give you the simplest negotiation strategy that you can use. it doesn't always work but often it does.it requires very little strain or stress on your part. for the average individual, here is the basic negotiating tactic:

If they hit your number, you can go, "YIPPEE! I'M GOING TO TAKE THE OFFER! YAY!!!" If you told them a particular number and they hit it or more, it isn't really right if you ask for more. after all, what does that really say about you. You told him one thing and now you want even more? it kind of makes you look like a pig.

however, if an organization hasn't hit the number that you been negotiating with them for or they know you been looking for because your agent or you have told him about it during the interview, here is the simplest strategy.

(Best listened to)

Step number 1 . "Huh (said as though you are pondering)." you will make it sound too uncomfortable but you want to pause a little bit then give them something.

"I've got to tell you I really love this firm but I think the offer is a touch low. I need to think about this a little bit. Can I get back to you tomorrow?"

Right off the bat, what that does is make them nervous. . You haven't said no. You put them in limbo. you given them the carrot of saying, "I love the job. I love the organization," but you hesitated. They know it's the money.

When you get back to them the next day, I want to be prepared for them with a number of points.

"Other than the money, is there anything that is in question for you?" Then you ask those questions.then you get to the real one… The money. By the way, with the other stuff, you need to know in your own mind what you're ready to walk away from. Not everything should be life and death on the secondary issues. when you get to the money part of the conversation which is what they're really waiting for, and you want to say yes to the firm,now it's just money standing in the way.

Pause.

Look them square in the eye

Whether you doing this in person or over the phone, you have to sound a little introspective and uncomfortable. like you are thinking (even though this is all planned and rehearsed).

You say, "I'm a little disappointed in the money. I know we spoke earlier about it being such and such in this, obviously, is less."

At this point, you pause again and allow them to respond to it. Or, you pause and they don't respond to it and then you say, "Could you do attach better?" Then you stay silent for a little bit. don't break the silence. Wait for them to respond 1st.

They may ask, "How much more?"

"I would really like the money I was talking with you about. I would like more but I would really like the money I was talking with you about."

"We can't go that high."

"Could you do a touch better? Could you meet me in the middle?"

The 1st option obviously is to go to her asking for. option number 2 is to go for the middle ground somewhere. Just get them to improve the offer somewhere above where they extended it.

Obviously, the 3rd option is that you can turn down their offer. Be prepared to do that because if you going to that negotiation with the attitude of being prepared to take whatever they give you, then, obviously, we going to the conversation little bit differently.

If they turn you down on improving the offer, you can always sigh and ask whether they can improve the review policy a little bit.instead of an annual review, can I give you a six-month review so that you have the possibility of getting a raise sooner.

Then, you are quiet again.

"There is no guarantee that you will get an increase but I think we can get your review in 6 months."

"Thank you. That I can say yes to. I can accept the offer."

Or, you say no based upon what you hear from them. if there unwilling to be flexible, there could be business reasons for that. they could be paying one individual less than what they are offering you who they are bringing in from the outside and they are afraid they might lose the other person. in theory, you should be concerned about that, but in practice, you should because it could impact you as well.

again, to do a quick review, step number 1 is to say, "I would like to think about it." step number 2 is covering all the other things you need to cover 1st and then getting "sincere" with them when you talk about the money (follow the advice above). they will often raise it, but if they won't. They may say, "we can't. This is the max in our budget." then, you ask if they can do a different review policy for you. Whatever the right answer is, you need to know going into the conversation what you are prepared to do, including walking away.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

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Starting a Negotiation with Yes | JobSearchTV.com


With credit to Nick Corcodilos of “Ask the Headhunter,” here is a smart way to negotiate changes to your job offer by starting with, “Yes.”

Summary

I want to give Nick Corcodillos credit for this one. He was, "Ask The Headhunter," a newspaper column and website. He is a great suggestion for a salary negotiation.
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It was prompted by a question he received from someone who lives in the Boston area and has an offer to join a firm in downtown Boston (traffic to his office would be hellish, of course). This is how he suggested the negotiation be handled.

The person wants to say yes, but the location is the problem. When you suggested someone do is to say something to the effect of, "I really want to say yes to your offer. I like the people; I like the team; I think the compensation is fine." Notice he is not saying, "I am accepting the offer." What he is saying is, "I really want to say yes to your offer."

"I would like to enter into discussion with you about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer before coming on board." Notice that he hasn't said yes, yet and that he wants to discuss 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. You praise the team, the money, the people and now you want to talk about 1 or 2 of the terms of the offer. In this case, the job would move to a work at home situation or a work from home 3 days a week/work at the office 2 days a week situation. No, nothing is guaranteed by firms are used to dealing with "take it or leave it situations" with what someone I know refers to as "sheeples." You know, people who act like sheep.

Rather than act like a sheep, you really know what you want and what you need. What you're doing is buttering them up by saying yes to a variety of things ("I really would like to say yes to your offer), and then saying that you want to enter into a discussion with them about 1 or 2 of the conditions if they would be amenable to it. What you're saying is that you need to negotiate some things.

Again, it doesn't mean that you are going to get them BUT you are starting off with a "yes." Nick believes that this type of butter up scenarios helps and in many of his negotiations.

Nick has a newsletter the comes out I believe every Thursday that you can sign up for at asktheHeadhunter.com. There is a lot of good advice there.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter