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JobSearchTV.com

Should I Always Answer When a Recruiter Contacts Me? | JobSearchTV.com


What do you think?

Summary

Should I always reply with a recruiter contacts me? That's today's question. Now, why does your recruiter contact you? They've got a job available. That's reason number one. Reason number two is they're trying to get you to refer someone to them for a job that's available. They think you're hiring someone. They want you to introduce them to someone who's hiring at your firm .Those tend to be the four basic reasons.
Now why should you NOT resond? You have no interest in what they're peddling. Okay, perfectly valid reason. The issue is () () or let me just debate back with you () sometime in the future, you may need them and, yes, you can say, " well they'll work with me anyway, I've got a great background," but why would you turn them off and not try to build a relationship with them?
You can always reply by saying. "Hey! Thanks for reaching out to me about that position. I'm not really interested right now." You can refer someone to them who might be interested or you can simply say, "I don't really know anyone who's looking who might fit that role but I do appreciate your reaching out to me." if you don't want to write that out? Create a signature file in Outlook or created in Word If you're using Gmail or Yahoo mail or one of the web-based services so that you can automatically copy and paste iti in.
If they are looking for a referral, you just respond by saying, "hey, thanks for reaching out. I don't know anyone who fits that profile who? Might consider something right now. No one's voiced it to me and I hope to hear from you in the future if you think there's something that makes sense."
They think you're trying to your hiring someone. You can respond by saying, " I'm not trying to hire right now and I appreciate you reaching out with the offer to help ."
They want an introduction. "I don't want to introduce someone to my boss who I don't really know well, and I'm a little busy right now to get to know you. So, no disrespect intended, you have to go a different way. "
All of these are very quick emails that you can pre write that allow you to communicate, not be rude and just very simply say. "Thanks, but no thanks,"in one way or another. Obviously if you're interested, there's a different response that you have.
But ,you know, I'll simply say it's not a lot of effort to offer quality results. So, don't just blow them off and ignore them if they're reaching out to you through inMail. It's costing them money to do that. LinkedIn will penalize them. If you don't respond. If you do respond, they get credited back the inMail to use towards contacting someone else.
Don't penalize people who are basically trying to help you. Yes, they'll help themselves in the process. But so what ?So what ? They're trying to help you by reaching out to you about an opportunity. You've got a free will and a choice. You can say yes or no. If they have reached you had the right time or what they say piques your interest, terrific!
But my belief is that every time you have an opportunity to build a relationship with someone ,you try to do it, especially if they're in a role where they can help you in the future.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

I Was Contacted By A Facebook Recruiter. I’m Not Interested in Changing Jobs | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/02/25/i-was-contacted-by-a-facebook-recruiter-im-not-interested-in-changing-jobs

EP 1026  I’ll start with the whole question and then offer an answer.

Summary

Here's today's question. I thought was an interesting want to start off the day with. Here's the scenario. I have been given. "I have been a software developer for about 10 years. I have a good job, although I don't work at any super famous company like Facebook, Google, Microsoft and such. I have a good project. Nice team and the salary I am comfortable with. I'm neither a genius, nor a guru. I'm often very unsure myself and sometimes freeze in interviews. So, I only change my job. What I need to, not to get a raise or anything. I've been contacted by a Facebook recruiter today. He asked me if I was interested in an interview. But the fact is, I'm not. Not really. Don't think I haven't tried to get into a big company. I have. Actually, I failed to Amazon on-site interviews and one Google phone screen all in the past 3 years . I understand the Facebook interview might be useful experience, even if I don't get past the phone screen. I just don't want another experience of a failure. How should I answer?"

Let me deconstruct the question little bit. When I was tell people is that the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those a great qualities to have). People get ahead by being alert to opportunity. Sometimes they are internal to the company; more often than not, they are external.

When I read that you freeze on interviews (you only change jobs when you need to), there is where I kind of zero in for a second. Part of that is because frankly, interviewing is just another skill that you need to develop. You are focused on the skills needed to perform your job, rather than the skills needed to get hired for a job. Just as an aside, that is what www.jobsearchcoachinghq.com is about. It helps people focusing on learning the skills needed to do a job search. That involves resumes, interviewing, answering tough interview questions, negotiating, resigning. There are whole. Most of different things that the site covers.

I'll simply say that you need to learn the skills needed to interview so that you have more confidence in yourself and your ability when you do. That's where you pick up on "freeze in the interview so that I only change my job when I need to not to get a raise or anything." That also tells me that you're probably being taken advantage of it. Your employer as well. That's because, frankly, helping you get ahead on 3% raises? Or 5% raises?

The way the system is set up, you need to do strategic job changes from time to time in order to advance financially. For example, let's say, you are a $100,000 per year person who gets a 4% raise or 5% raise. You are now it $105,000. Yay! But let's say you change jobs for an additional $15,000 per year and then get a 5% raise… Do you get where I'm going with this? The system is set up for you to change jobs every 2 to 3 years tops. I've read on the statistically in another case, if you change jobs for a $10,000 raise and, after 3 years, change jobs again for another $10,000 raise… Let's just work the math here. You are at $100,000 per year and change jobs for $10,000 raise. After 3 years, you are plus $30,000. Then, you change your job again after 3 years for another $10,000 raise (I'm not taking into account the raises that you might get and how much hired your salary will be after you are on board. That's because if you get a 4% raise on $100,000, that's a 4% raise. If you get on $110,000, it is going to be a higher number).

If you change jobs again after 3 years, you are now $70,000 ahead after 5 years because you are plus $10,000 twice. Can you afford to give up $70,000 per year pretax? Translated about $30,000-$40,000 per year after tax in order to be "comfortable?" I 0 in on that stuff.

Putting it aside, how do you respond to the recruiter. "Could you tell me about the role you have in mind for me and how you might see I could help?" Listen to what they have to say. I want to practice that into a habit instead of the fear habit that you have. Start thinking of yourself as being capable.

They may not want to hire you but you have to work on your interview and job search skills so that when you do hear about a position you can act on it and be prepared to act on it. You want to have a resume that is up to date and update every 3 to 4 months even if you send it nowhere. I want you to hear that again. Even if you sent it nowhere in order to ensure that if you do hear about a position, you can act on it.

It also has the 2nd big benefit that come review time, you are well prepared for your review because I've seen any number of situations where, right before review time, a manager leaves and you're being critiqued by someone who doesn't know your work and people get a little uncomfortable under those circumstances. Maybe they are being critiqued for a two-month period of time when the new manager is there, but you have a full year of experiences that you need to educate your new manager about.

Having your resume out that they will help you with that. It would also allow you to respond quickly to opportunities that are presented because invariably someone asks for a resume, right? You need to learn particular job search skills so that comes a time that the phone rings and it is a job that you are interested in you are ready to roll.

So, asked him to tell you about the job and how you might be able to help, listen, and then say, "That's interesting. Could you give me an hour to think about it?" I'm doing this from the standpoint of helping you practice. Helping you practice responding to these inquiries and not just simply having the knee-jerk, "I'm not interested. I don't want to get rejected"kind of reaction.

So, again, practice interviewing in practice how you respond with this recruiter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

I Was Contacted By A Facebook Recruiter For a Position. I’m Not Interested in Changing Jobs | JobSearchTV.com


I have been contacted by a Facebook recruiter today. He asks if I’m interested in an interview, but the fact is, I am not. Not really. Don’t think that I haven’t tried to get into a big company. How should I respond?

I’ll start with the whole question and then offer my answer

Summary

Here's today's question. I thought was an interesting want to start off the day with. Here's the scenario. I have been given. "I have been a software developer for about 10 years. I have a good job, although I don't work at any super famous company like Facebook, Google, Microsoft and such. I have a good project. Nice team and the salary I am comfortable with. I'm neither a genius, nor a guru. I'm often very unsure myself and sometimes freeze in interviews. So, I only change my job. What I need to, not to get a raise or anything. I've been contacted by a Facebook recruiter today. He asked me if I was interested in an interview. But the fact is, I'm not. Not really. Don't think I haven't tried to get into a big company. I have. Actually, I failed to Amazon on-site interviews and one Google phone screen all in the past 3 years . I understand the Facebook interview might be useful experience, even if I don't get past the phone screen. I just don't want another experience of a failure. How should I answer?"

Let me deconstruct the question little bit. When I was tell people is that the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those a great qualities to have). People get ahead by being alert to opportunity. Sometimes they are internal to the company; more often than not, they are external.

When I read that you freeze on interviews (you only change jobs when you need to), there is where I kind of zero in for a second. Part of that is because frankly, interviewing is just another skill that you need to develop. You are focused on the skills needed to perform your job, rather than the skills needed to get hired for a job. Just as an aside, that is what www.jobsearchcoachinghq.com is about. It helps people focusing on learning the skills needed to do a job search. That involves resumes, interviewing, answering tough interview questions, negotiating, resigning. There are whole. Most of different things that the site covers.

I'll simply say that you need to learn the skills needed to interview so that you have more confidence in yourself and your ability when you do. That's where you pick up on "freeze in the interview so that I only change my job when I need to not to get a raise or anything." That also tells me that you're probably being taken advantage of it. Your employer as well. That's because, frankly, helping you get ahead on 3% raises? Or 5% raises?

The way the system is set up, you need to do strategic job changes from time to time in order to advance financially. For example, let's say, you are a $100,000 per year person who gets a 4% raise or 5% raise. You are now it $105,000. Yay! But let's say you change jobs for an additional $15,000 per year and then get a 5% raise… Do you get where I'm going with this? The system is set up for you to change jobs every 2 to 3 years tops. I've read on the statistically in another case, if you change jobs for a $10,000 raise and, after 3 years, change jobs again for another $10,000 raise… Let's just work the math here. You are at $100,000 per year and change jobs for $10,000 raise. After 3 years, you are plus $30,000. Then, you change your job again after 3 years for another $10,000 raise (I'm not taking into account the raises that you might get and how much hired your salary will be after you are on board. That's because if you get a 4% raise on $100,000, that's a 4% raise. If you get on $110,000, it is going to be a higher number).

If you change jobs again after 3 years, you are now $70,000 ahead after 5 years because you are plus $10,000 twice. Can you afford to give up $70,000 per year pretax? Translated about $30,000-$40,000 per year after tax in order to be "comfortable?" I 0 in on that stuff.

Putting it aside, how do you respond to the recruiter. "Could you tell me about the role you have in mind for me and how you might see I could help?" Listen to what they have to say. I want to practice that into a habit instead of the fear habit that you have. Start thinking of yourself as being capable.

They may not want to hire you but you have to work on your interview and job search skills so that when you do hear about a position you can act on it and be prepared to act on it. You want to have a resume that is up to date and update every 3 to 4 months even if you send it nowhere. I want you to hear that again. Even if you sent it nowhere in order to ensure that if you do hear about a position, you can act on it.

It also has the 2nd big benefit that come review time, you are well prepared for your review because I've seen any number of situations where, right before review time, a manager leaves and you're being critiqued by someone who doesn't know your work and people get a little uncomfortable under those circumstances. Maybe they are being critiqued for a two-month period of time when the new manager is there, but you have a full year of experiences that you need to educate your new manager about.

Having your resume out that they will help you with that. It would also allow you to respond quickly to opportunities that are presented because invariably someone asks for a resume, right? You need to learn particular job search skills so that comes a time that the phone rings and it is a job that you are interested in you are ready to roll.

So, asked him to tell you about the job and how you might be able to help, listen, and then say, "That's interesting. Could you give me an hour to think about it?" I'm doing this from the standpoint of helping you practice. Helping you practice responding to these inquiries and not just simply having the knee-jerk, "I'm not interested. I don't want to get rejected"kind of reaction.

So, again, practice interviewing in practice how you respond with this recruiter.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

I Was Contacted By A Facebook Recruiter. I’m Not Interested in Changing Jobs | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

EP 1026  I’ll start with the whole question and then offer an answer.

Summary

Here's today's question. I thought was an interesting want to start off the day with. Here's the scenario. I have been given. "I have been a software developer for about 10 years. I have a good job, although I don't work at any super famous company like Facebook, Google, Microsoft and such. I have a good project. Nice team and the salary I am comfortable with. I'm neither a genius, nor a guru. I'm often very unsure myself and sometimes freeze in interviews. So, I only change my job. What I need to, not to get a raise or anything. I've been contacted by a Facebook recruiter today. He asked me if I was interested in an interview. But the fact is, I'm not. Not really. Don't think I haven't tried to get into a big company. I have. Actually, I failed to Amazon on-site interviews and one Google phone screen all in the past 3 years . I understand the Facebook interview might be useful experience, even if I don't get past the phone screen. I just don't want another experience of a failure. How should I answer?"

Let me deconstruct the question little bit. When I was tell people is that the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those a great qualities to have). People get ahead by being alert to opportunity. Sometimes they are internal to the company; more often than not, they are external.

When I read that you freeze on interviews (you only change jobs when you need to), there is where I kind of zero in for a second. Part of that is because frankly, interviewing is just another skill that you need to develop. You are focused on the skills needed to perform your job, rather than the skills needed to get hired for a job. Just as an aside, that is what www.jobsearchcoachinghq.com is about. It helps people focusing on learning the skills needed to do a job search. That involves resumes, interviewing, answering tough interview questions, negotiating, resigning. There are whole. Most of different things that the site covers.

I'll simply say that you need to learn the skills needed to interview so that you have more confidence in yourself and your ability when you do. That's where you pick up on "freeze in the interview so that I only change my job when I need to not to get a raise or anything." That also tells me that you're probably being taken advantage of it. Your employer as well. That's because, frankly, helping you get ahead on 3% raises? Or 5% raises?

The way the system is set up, you need to do strategic job changes from time to time in order to advance financially. For example, let's say, you are a $100,000 per year person who gets a 4% raise or 5% raise. You are now it $105,000. Yay! But let's say you change jobs for an additional $15,000 per year and then get a 5% raise… Do you get where I'm going with this? The system is set up for you to change jobs every 2 to 3 years tops. I've read on the statistically in another case, if you change jobs for a $10,000 raise and, after 3 years, change jobs again for another $10,000 raise… Let's just work the math here. You are at $100,000 per year and change jobs for $10,000 raise. After 3 years, you are plus $30,000. Then, you change your job again after 3 years for another $10,000 raise (I'm not taking into account the raises that you might get and how much hired your salary will be after you are on board. That's because if you get a 4% raise on $100,000, that's a 4% raise. If you get on $110,000, it is going to be a higher number).

If you change jobs again after 3 years, you are now $70,000 ahead after 5 years because you are plus $10,000 twice. Can you afford to give up $70,000 per year pretax? Translated about $30,000-$40,000 per year after tax in order to be "comfortable?" I 0 in on that stuff.

Putting it aside, how do you respond to the recruiter. "Could you tell me about the role you have in mind for me and how you might see I could help?" Listen to what they have to say. I want to practice that into a habit instead of the fear habit that you have. Start thinking of yourself as being capable.

They may not want to hire you but you have to work on your interview and job search skills so that when you do hear about a position you can act on it and be prepared to act on it. You want to have a resume that is up to date and update every 3 to 4 months even if you send it nowhere. I want you to hear that again. Even if you sent it nowhere in order to ensure that if you do hear about a position, you can act on it.

It also has the 2nd big benefit that come review time, you are well prepared for your review because I've seen any number of situations where, right before review time, a manager leaves and you're being critiqued by someone who doesn't know your work and people get a little uncomfortable under those circumstances. Maybe they are being critiqued for a two-month period of time when the new manager is there, but you have a full year of experiences that you need to educate your new manager about.

Having your resume out that they will help you with that. It would also allow you to respond quickly to opportunities that are presented because invariably someone asks for a resume, right? You need to learn particular job search skills so that comes a time that the phone rings and it is a job that you are interested in you are ready to roll.

So, asked him to tell you about the job and how you might be able to help, listen, and then say, "That's interesting. Could you give me an hour to think about it?" I'm doing this from the standpoint of helping you practice. Helping you practice responding to these inquiries and not just simply having the knee-jerk, "I'm not interested. I don't want to get rejected"kind of reaction.

So, again, practice interviewing in practice how you respond with this recruiter.

.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.