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JobSearchTV.com

Getting Leverage in Your Salary Negotiation | JobSearchTV.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you a technique for getting more leverage in your salary negotiations.

Summary

In an earlier video, I talked about the easiest way to negotiate a higher salary for yourself. If you haven't seen it, watch it on YouTube or a JeffAltman.com. It's a good little video, where you put a hiring firm in the position of negotiating against itself.
Now, one of the ways to get extra leverage in that negotiation is, as soon as you get the job offer, as soon as they say we'd like to hire you, and you hear the price, you want to go for a bit more, here's the tip, I want to add on to that one. And that is, "Wow, that's fabulous. I have a question for you. What made me the winner? What provided me with the edge that caused you to choose me over the others?"
Now, what you're doing is you're getting information from them about why you were the best person so that now you can use that in your salary negotiation, as the advantage to try and get more money out of them, more benefits out of them. With big companies, it's hard to get more benefits but, you know, you can always get more money, he might be able to get an extra day off or two here or there. You might be able to get some, some better upside for yourself in the future.
So again, as soon as they talk with you about the offer, as soon as they extend the salary offer, just turn it around and say, "hey, that's terrific. I'm thrilled. Thank you so much. Hey, I was curious," and then you go into your question.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Get an Offer Letter | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to get an offer letter before resigning your job.

Summary

I want to talk to you today about the most important piece of information I can teach you about negotiating salary. And I'm going to start with a story of someone I knew some years ago; I was representing him with a client.
They orally extended an offer. He accepted, he gives his notice. Suddenly, they call him up and they go, "Well, we've been thinking about it and we decided we can't afford to hire you." And although I told him to the contrary, he'd given his notice without getting an offer letter.
What is an offer letter? An offer letter is, of course, a written document issued by an employer that confirms the details of the offer. It doesn't usually go through the benefits; that's normally in a brochure that comes separately from the offer letter. The benefits brochure's normally referenced in the letter. So if you're looking for information about benefits, you're not going to find that there.
Normally, it will say something about along the lines of congratulations on your decision to join such and such firm. We know it's a great choice and we think you'll be a wonderful addition to our firm. You're starting salary will be (It will quote it either on an annualized basis or on the basis of a pay period, something along those lines). It'll talk with you about other certain basic obvious terms and conditions.
Ultimately, it comes down to your salary. It's specifically mentioned there. Why is that important? Real simple. It's your legal protection. Imagine for a second you started a job and you expected one salary and suddenly your check says something very different. You go, "Hey, I was told this number. This is less. No one told me."Hello. How do you prove this at that point? You're already on board. Yeah, you can quit your job but who's getting hurt there?
You.
You never want to put yourself in that position where you're vulnerable. Almost every firm issues an offer letter or, if they don't, it's red flag to, because that is your legal protection against shenanigans. You never want to have to go through what this fellow did with me calling up this firm and going, "He gave his notice. Now I know he can't prove it. But he told me that you issued this offer. He'll sue you. So you can go through this and I'm sure you'll win, but do you really want to go through this?
And they said, "no," and they backed down and they made him an employee. But for those few hours, this guy was scared to death. You never want to put yourself in that position. An offer letter is a regular part of business. You never resign your job until you or your agent has that letter in hand and confirms the basic data that you were told orally. Without that you could have real problems.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I

JobSearchTV.com
JobSearchTV.com

function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice

Play to Their Emotions, Too | No BS Hiring Advice


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to not only use logic when you get into a negotiation with a potential hire.

Summary

I want to give you some No BS Hiring Advice that's going to help you in new salary negotiations with candidates. This is one of the hardest lessons to get but can prove it.
Here's the lesson. It's not facts that always win the day. It's emotions that do. Let me prove it to you.
For those of you who smoke or for those of you who are smokers, factually you know that smoking isn't healthy for you, right? You know, at some point, if you continue to smoke, you'll put yourself in a situation where you are going to suffer a lot. Your health is going to suffer tremendously and maybe smoking or the impact of smoking will kill you. These are the facts.
Yet, millions of people, 10s of millions of people continue to smoke. Why wouldn't that same lesson extend itself to a salary negotiation?
We all, whether it's a third party recruiter or a corporate recruiter, spend a lot of time with the factual element of why someone should take a job. We spend less time with the emotional element and we need to shift that some. I want to be clear, you're not going to persuade someone to take $20,000 less by dealing with your emotions. The likelihood of that is real slim.
For most middle management professionals, however, you can entice them to join if your offer is close to ideal by talking with him about their relationship with the manager, particularly after the interview. If the manager does things that cause the candidates to enjoy them, to have fun with them. If you think this is all stuff the works only in startups, let me correct you. This works in any organization.
Besides, the hiring manager has a key role in the salary negotiation, not because he or she is negotiating it but because they're creating an image in the candidates mind of being someone that they'll want to work for. Because they're fun, they're upbeat, they're someone that they could learn a lot from while they're doing this job.
You need to impress upon your hiring managers their contribution to the hire so that, in this way, when you get down to the close, you can spend time on the emotional aspects of this and not just on the factual ones.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)
Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

 

No BS Hiring Advice

Avoid Discussing Salary | No BS Hiring Advice


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it is not in your firm’s interest to show your hand before extending a job offer to someone.

Summary

Today, I want to offer you some no BS hiring advice in the realm of salary negotiation with candidates. Now, as an HR professional business owner, manager, at an organization that's involved with hiring, negotiations are always one of those tricky issues. You want to get someone for the least amount of money, but you also want to make them happy. So, you don't want to necessarily squeeze them. But you also don't want to overpay because, after all, you've got a budget to contend with.
Often, hiring managers, HR professionals, you know you are you going into a negotiation with a candidate or with someone like me, a recruiter who's representing a candidate (NOTE: I no longer do recruiting) and you get to a point in the negotiation where you reveal your hand about what you're willing to pay for someone. Probably, not a good idea.
Now, let me break it into two parts. First part is with a candidate. By telling them, "the most I'm willing to pay is such and such . . . " I'm not talking about we're screening someone ithe very beginning. I'm talking about at the pre-offer phase when you're really in the negotiation phase about salary . . . what you've done is basically tell them this is the max I'm willing to pay and, if you offer them five cents less, they are going to go, "What happened? You said you'd pay to such and such but you came in less." It impacts your ability to make them happy, make it attractive for them to join . . .What have you.
You're better off in those kind of situations offering a little bit less than what you're prepared to offer. So, in this way, if you come in higher than that, they get a little bit more enthusiastic. One of my clients has that built into their offer scenario where they talk about less. If they get the person for less, great! But, at the same time, was prepared to go a few dollars higher. They are able to show, time and again, that this is a tactic that, for them, saves some money and, if necessary, they are already slotted for more so there's no sweat.
The second part of this is in talking with recruiters like I was, I worked very closely with my clients. I don't play games. Some recruiters play games and, you know, the issue comes down to you're about to make an offer to someone. They will know how much are you going to offer? How much are you going to offer?
What they're trying to do is close the candidate for you and that sounds great . . . but if you tell them, "well, I can go up to (I will pick a number of random) $10 and you offer them $7.50, or, let me be clear about that, you're prepared to go to 10, but initially you want them to to offer them $8, so, if they say yes to $8, great!
If you need to, you'll go to $10, you tell that to a recruiter, they're not going to try to hard because they know they've got the 10 locked up and their fee is contingent upon how much you want to pay. And, I'll simply say that, especially for contingency recruiting firms, you know, it's better not to let them in on the numbers. The executive search which I try to do with many of my clients even though, often, I operate on a contingency basis, I'm working for my institutional customer.
Yes, I have to deliver a candidate to you but, you know, at the same time, I'm trying to be fair. I want to have that strong relationship with you and I don't play games. So, if you tell me you're prepared to go to $10 but you'd like me to offer $8, I'm going to do that. I'm going to work toward closing it. I've done that many many times. But ,you know, for most recruiters, you can hold back that extra information because, otherwise, there's no financial incentive for them, particularly in the contingency world.
So, better to hold back. Don't always be so revealing about the numbers you're prepared to pay. Make the recruiter work that much harder in order to close the sale. It saves your organization money.
Hey, it's not your effort that's going into this.It is the recruiter's and, if you burn out one, there's gonna be another one who's gonna replace them. And, frankly, if they're doing deals with you, they're going to keep working. So like I said, hold back on what the numbers are going to be so this way, you know, you're not just giving away extra money unnecessarily.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

JobSearchTV.com

Should I Tell Them What I Earn? | JobSearchTV.com


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses whether to disclose your salary during an interview.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

JobSearchTV.com

Deciding Between Multiple Job Offers | JobSearchTV.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the process you should use to decide between two or more job offers.

Summary

One of my subscribers sent me a message through YouTube asking the question that basically translates into, “How do I decide between multiple job offers?”

Well, the answer to that is actually pretty easy and let me just explain. Before you start your job search, you have to sit down and ask yourself this question, “what's most important to you in the next job or organization? What will I need to see or hear to believe that it's the right place for me to join?”

Once you have asked and answered that question, it is easy because you can matchup the jobs are proposed and the way the firm is explaining the upside to these opportunities to you with your own particular goals and ambitions. You can matchup compensation that you were looking for with what's been offered to you.

This it doesn’t mean that you can't be flexible and frankly, you should be, because, often, the original requirements are not based on any reality. They’re completely ungrounded magical kind of thought .

“Oh, I wish I could become the such and such. No, I'm a programmer and love to be the CIO.” Completely unrealistic.

But, assuming that you were realistic with what your interests and motivations were, line up your offers against those goals. Having done that, once you have it narrowed down to a preference, then you have to do one extra step.

Assuming that I may need to look for job again, what will this opportunity do for me in terms of the marketplace, in terms of my marketability, in terms of what my long-term goals are, not just simply what you want to accomplish now but what you look at want to accomplish of your career.

Once you match those of up, sometimes your answer becomes a little bit different. But only you know how you should weight the scale; by that I mean only you know what you should put extra emphasis on. Is it the money now or the upside potential in the future?

I can’t answer that kind of a question; only you can. But, that's the mechanics of how you should really go about doing it.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice

Salary Negotiation Advice for Employers | No BS Hiring Advice


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how you as an employer can negotiate salary with someone and come out a hero to your firm and still have a thrilled employee.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow me at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn http://linkd.in/1momsP9
for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube http://bit.ly/13EP9fa
for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Visit <a href=”http://
www.TheBigGameHunter.us” >www.TheBigGameHunter.us
; there’s a lot more there

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Pay what you want for my books about job hunting http://bit.ly/1xWoiiO

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

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Salary Negotiation Mistakes | JobSearchTV.com


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses Some of the mistakes job hunters make when negotiating their new salary.

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about that most difficult of subjects for job hunters – – salary negotiation and some of the mistakes people make when they get to that phase of the interviewing where they are negotiating salary. I'm not talking about when and employer says, “So, how much he earning,” and you quote a number. I’m discussing the point where and employer’s ready to make an offer and they are trying to size you up for compensation. So, here a couple of mistakes that people make.

1, They don't negotiate at all. A firm puts out an offer, they go, “WOW1 THAT’S FABULOUS!!!’ You can always do a little bit better, even if you are excited by the offer. Now, I’m not talking about if they hit your number. You told them what you are looking for and they hit it. There, you just simply say, “thank you,” and accept the offer. I’m talking about they are a little off on the number or you haven't shared the number and they are just extending an offer. You just can't accept the first thing. Minimally, watch my video, “The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary” https://youtu.be/6P8AbomG5F4
You can always do a little bit better.

2. The except the first offer that is made to them. It’s like, “Here’s our offer.”

“Great! I’ll take it.”

Always try to do a little bit better.

3. Another thing people do is that they don’t get the offer in writing.

I remember, years ago, someone came to me and they were very upset and they are telling me their story and I’m going through their background and I could hear in their voice that they are being upset and, you know, the long and the short of the was that they received an offer orally but by the time it was put in writing it was a different number… or maybe they just misheard the number. No matter, you always have to get the offer in writing since that is your legal protection against shenanigans.

4. Another thing that people do is, frankly, you know, when the offer is made and it is not the right number, they take it personally.

“How dare you?? What's wrong with you?”

That is what goes through their mind. They don’t, necessarily, have to say it, but they get angry. The goofy situation is that people get angry because employers have a salary range. I’m going to work with simple numbers. Let's say it's 100- $110,000 per year and they offer $105.

“How dare you not offer may the max money!!

“Well, you didn't rank to that level,” or their formula doesn't allow them to extend to that level. Whatever the reason is they made a different offer. There are tactics that you can use (like I said, The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary” is another video I've done that is very popular on YouTube. You watch that technique for getting a slightly higher offer). However, the long and short of it is don’t take it personally.

It's like in “The Godfather.”

“It's business, it's not personal.”

They’re not trying to offend you and everyone's trying to save a buck these days and they are no different than you are.

So, grow up, man! Grow up, lady!

No, it’s not a personal thing. So, always try to do a little bit better yourself. Don't just accept the first thing that they offer. Always try to negotiate a little bit higher, even if you pleased, EXCEPT if they've hit the number that you asked them for. Then, you just say, “thank you,” and accept the offer.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Discussing Money | JobSearchTV.com


Most of the advice you will receive about discussing salary is guaranteed to get you rejected at the interview.

NOTE: I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING. IN ADDITION, THERE ARE SOME PLACES IN THE US WHERE IT IS NOW ILLEGAL TO ASK ABOUT WHAT YOU ARE EARNING

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about salary negotiation, discussing money, the job offer . . . Stuff along those lines but particularly in the area of money.

Now, let me just start by saying that most of the advice that you read on the web about discussing money is going to be a problem for you because it basically always tells you never to talk about money. Never tell them how much you are earning. Never discuss how much you are looking for . . . stuff along those lines.

For the typical job hunter (and, again, I'm not talking about Donald Trump), I'm talking about most of you who are going to be watching this video, that advice is going to get you escorted out the door act most organizations. Why? Because they want to know. Why? Very simply, they want to know that whether your compensation is within their budget. It’s really that simple. So, avoiding that conversation ticks them off and is 1 of the surest ways to get you the interview abruptly ended that I can imagine.

So, how do you deal with money? I want to differentiate between the employer and the recruiter as I answer this question. With the 3rd party recruiter, I always want to tell them how much I'm making and how much I will be earning. Why? It's not because I was a recruiter. Very simply, they need to know whether a job that they're working on is a fit for you potentially.

If you're making radically less than what that job is, you are going to need to justify why you're the right value for it. Let me explain why. Most the time, (I'm just to give an exaggerated example), the $40,000 person looking at the $80,000 job.

“I'm underpaid.”

“Why are you underpaid you? Explain to me exactly how come your underpaid vis a vis this role.”

“I can do this job.”

“Yeah?”

“Well, I work at a company no is ever heard the name of before and I want to work at a big company that will pay me a lot more.”

It doesn't work that way. Small companies don't have the kind of environments the big companies do and, as a result, big firms devalue the experience of smaller firms. So, you are going to have to come up with a better explanation. If you're an IT person, you are going to talk about how your experience really fits the role and that because you worked in a smaller firm, they didn't have the budget to pay to that level, but other firms will and you want to be compensated fairly.

You may not get to the top end of the range, but you get close to it. But, in talking with the recruiter, that's really where you are going to practice know how you are going to pitch yourself as being worth such a strong salary increase.

With the Corporation, if you working with a recruiter, they've already covered that. The Corporation may try and test that a little bit but stick to your guns and stick to your explanation for why you're worth that money.

If you are an executive it's a different scenario. You really don't talk about money. I'm not talking about someone at a manager or VP level period I'm talking C level executives because, frankly, no one is going to argue with you over money and, if they do, this is probably the wrong organization for you.

But for those who were at a lower level, money always comes into play. And as I said, if you avoid discussing it, if you refuse to answer the question, frankly, the interview is going to end.

So, again, on the corporate side, you do something a little bit different than you do with the agency recruiter. You may talk with them about what you're currently earning. You may tell them that what you looking for is the strongest offer and if they decide that you're the right person for them (and this certainly seems like a great opportunity for you) you are going to encourage them to make their strongest offer. That is one way of broaching it.

Now, in the example of the $40,000 person looking for the $80,000 job, you have to be very calm as you answer the question and understand that some firms are just are not going to do it. That may not be an answer that you want to hear, but it's factually correct.

Some firms are just not going to give you the $75,000 that you may want if you making $40,000 and you need to be prepared to walk away from an opportunity might otherwise like because the money isn't right. If you our not prepared to do it, don’t make money the sticking point.

But as you talk with a firm, just simply tell them this is what you really looking for, but understand you are willing to be h flexible period you are not going to be a fool and take 45 knowing full well that they were prepared to pay more. You want to be treated fairly by them and you are willing to reduce the comp a little bit and give them a bit of a discount if you judge the opportunity is right for you.

At the same time, you want to hit the market value because, up until this point, you haven’t been paid that way.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

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JobSearchaGram: Salary Negotiation


A very short video about salary negotiation.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.