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NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Turning On Your Acting Chops | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/04/20/turning-on-your-acting-chops-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1440. I was reminded again of how important your acting skills need to be when interviewing.

Summary

Friends, Romans and countrymen. Let me you ear. Obviously, I am pretending to be acting but when you are on an interview, you are pretending to be an actor or actress, and are putting on her performance. 1 of the most difficult performances you have to put on is the performance of sincerity.

You see, I was reminded of this by someone I started coaching recently who, when they came to me, spoke about coming so close on so many interviews. Employers seem to be concerned about her taking a step backward in her career. She has been in very senior roles and, as she says so eloquently, I've made my money already.

Now, I want to do something I like. I believe her because she could certainly go out and find something similar to what she's done before. So she's interested in a lesser role than what she's held. The result winds up being firms have difficulty trusting her so they choose other people.

It doesn't help that she's not 24 and that she's an older worker probably early 50s, mid 50s, I'm not absolutely sure, but be that as it may, you know she's dealing with ageism. So let's put that aside for a second.

I've dealt with ageism in others videos. Here, it's about the acting performance. The performance you have to deliver is the one around sincerity. How do you recognize sincerity?

So if I speed up my my speech and and and I just talk in a direct way with you and I'm asked, "You know, this is is gong to be a job that is beneath you. If you respond back with the the typical rebuttals-- "Well this is something I'm interested in. What is it that I could do for you to prove that to you," . . . all the usual stuff. It's not going to work.
"
But if what you did when they said something along the lines of, "I'm not sure if this position will be a fit for you. It would probably be a step down," they're being sincere and you have to mirror that

The mirroring comes down to , "I can understand how you feel and I know what if I were hiring I'm I would have that concern as well."

What I've done is slow down my speech to project sincerity and honesty so that you I'm appearing as though I'm being completely vulnerable in front of you and, as such, did you notice how my speech got a little softer, that my speech slowed down radically.

I acknowledge this almost like it was feel, felt and found close. "I know how you feel You feel. I felt that way myself before, but you know what I found?"

That's the feel felt and found close. If a salesperson puts that on if you can just smile in the future, remember this conversation. For you what you need to do in these situations is project, sincerity. That comes from slowing your speech down, speaking a little softer, maybe periodically breaking eye contact, and you doing the kinds of things that you normally would do in order to demonstrate how honest and credible you are, his

This my version. I think the slow speech and the softer tone are you a send may be US centric but I think the notion applies throughout the world.

Sincerity is how you convince people that when they're telling you what their concerns are, you hear them, you understand how they feel, but this is what you really want to do and no amount of arguing with them is going to work. I don't know how it is with you, but it's like the more they argue more the more I don't listen.

When you appear vulnerable and open, there you can win.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Turning On Your Acting Chops | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2019/04/20/turning-on-your-acting-chops-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1440. I was reminded again of how important your acting skills need to be when interviewing.

Summary

Friends, Romans and countrymen. Let me you ear. Obviously, I am pretending to be acting but when you are on an interview, you are pretending to be an actor or actress, and are putting on her performance. 1 of the most difficult performances you have to put on is the performance of sincerity.

You see, I was reminded of this by someone I started coaching recently who, when they came to me, spoke about coming so close on so many interviews. Employers seem to be concerned about her taking a step backward in her career. She has been in very senior roles and, as she says so eloquently, I've made my money already.

Now, I want to do something I like. I believe her because she could certainly go out and find something similar to what she's done before. So she's interested in a lesser role than what she's held. The result winds up being firms have difficulty trusting her so they choose other people.

It doesn't help that she's not 24 and that she's an older worker probably early 50s, mid 50s, I'm not absolutely sure, but be that as it may, you know she's dealing with ageism. So let's put that aside for a second.

I've dealt with ageism in others videos. Here, it's about the acting performance. The performance you have to deliver is the one around sincerity. How do you recognize sincerity?

So if I speed up my my speech and and and I just talk in a direct way with you and I'm asked, "You know, this is is gong to be a job that is beneath you. If you respond back with the the typical rebuttals-- "Well this is something I'm interested in. What is it that I could do for you to prove that to you," . . . all the usual stuff. It's not going to work.
"
But if what you did when they said something along the lines of, "I'm not sure if this position will be a fit for you. It would probably be a step down," they're being sincere and you have to mirror that

The mirroring comes down to , "I can understand how you feel and I know what if I were hiring I'm I would have that concern as well."

What I've done is slow down my speech to project sincerity and honesty so that you I'm appearing as though I'm being completely vulnerable in front of you and, as such, did you notice how my speech got a little softer, that my speech slowed down radically.

I acknowledge this almost like it was feel, felt and found close. "I know how you feel You feel. I felt that way myself before, but you know what I found?"

That's the feel felt and found close. If a salesperson puts that on if you can just smile in the future, remember this conversation. For you what you need to do in these situations is project, sincerity. That comes from slowing your speech down, speaking a little softer, maybe periodically breaking eye contact, and you doing the kinds of things that you normally would do in order to demonstrate how honest and credible you are, his

This my version. I think the slow speech and the softer tone are you a send may be US centric but I think the notion applies throughout the world.

Sincerity is how you convince people that when they're telling you what their concerns are, you hear them, you understand how they feel, but this is what you really want to do and no amount of arguing with them is going to work. I don't know how it is with you, but it's like the more they argue more the more I don't listen.

When you appear vulnerable and open, there you can win.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. 

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice

Pre-employment assessment, skill testing and interviewing

We often hear terms like pre-employment assessment, skill testing and even interviewing used interchangeably. While they may have similar high level goals, such as identifying a suitable candidate, they are fundamentally different methods of achieving those goals. It’s important to know the difference because each evaluation method will produce completely different outputs. Moreover, in some cases it might make sense to combine one or more of these methods.

One of the best discussions I’ve heard on this topic was on a podcast called Hire Up hosted by John P. Beck, Jr. The episode was titled Assessments Made Simple, Human, Smart and featured Dr. Scott Hamilton, the CEO of Hamilton & Associates Consulting.

Dr. Hamilton distinguished between each candidate evaluation method with ease and clarity. It’s worth listening to the entire episode but, otherwise, I have summarized some of the key points in this article and added my own thoughts as well.

Skill testing

Skill testing is all about understanding whether someone can do something or knows something. It can be a simple task, a range of complex tasks or demonstrable knowledge. It’s possible to test for almost any skill because you can simply watch people perform tasks.

Dr. Hamilton gives the simplest of examples: “if someone is going to have to weld metal, you want see them weld metal”.

This is why résumés and interviews are inherently poor methods of validating skills. They are focused on what candidates claim they can do, not what they can actually do. Instead, it’s far more compelling to see how people perform. Literally. Moreover, it’s far simpler.

Skill testing is context-dependent, and therefore subjective in nature. But it’s also capable of being objectively assessed, which means it can be pass/fail. Confusing, right?

Let’s take a writing test as an example. The style of writing you test depends entirely on the job. It could be anything from creative writing to technical writing. So the test is bespoke. At the same time, it is usually possible to objectively determine whether a candidate performed well. To use Dr. Hamilton’s welding example, either someone knows how to weld metal or they don’t.

The opposite is usually true of pre-employment assessment.

Pre-employment assessment: what is it?

Pre-employment assessment is focused on predicting how people will behave in certain scenarios, not what they can do. They explore key personality traits based on an understanding that someone’s personality can predict their behavior. Most personality assessments are based on the Five-Factor Model, which asserts that there are five personality supertraits:

  1. Openness to experience
  2. Conscientiousness
  3. Extraversion
  4. Agreeableness
  5. Neuroticism

Therefore, if we gain an understanding of someone’s personality, and particularly these five supertraits, we will have a good chance of knowing how they will react in different situations. Unlike skill testing, this doesn’t mean someone can do the job. But it may shed light on how they will do the job.

Pre-employment assessment: does personality change?

Now here’s the tricky part. While skills can be taught, many people think that personality is fixed. However, that isn’t entirely true. Studies have shown that personality can, and does, change over time. While most people don’t change in a fundamental way, it is possible to change behaviors and habits, according to Carol Dweck. And it’s those very behaviors that are relevant to how someone will perform in a job, not their personality per se. That’s why two people with different personalities can perform well in the same role.

Whether we believe personality is fixed or not, it is not something that can be measured in binary terms such as pass/fail, like an Excel test. It’s who we are and, if we subscribe to the theory that personality changes over time, it’s who are are at the time of assessment. This means that the outcome of a personality assessment can’t be viewed as “good” or “bad” in isolation, it can only indicate potential suitability for a specific job. Conversely, someone can be good at Excel.

 

Additionally, if used incorrectly, personality assessments can be harmful to the hiring process. That’s why pre-employment assessments that test personality need to be validated. Skill testing, on the other hand, is inherently bespoke.

What does this all mean?

This is where it gets interesting. Let’s start with the dictionary:

  • A test means “a procedure intended to establish the quality, performance, or reliability of something, especially before it is taken into widespread use”.
  • To assess means  to “evaluate or estimate the nature, ability, or quality of”.
  • An interview means “A meeting of people face to face, especially for consultation”.

 

Interviewing

Tests and assessments sound fairly similar. They are ways of measuring ability or quality. On the other hand, an interview is a discussion. Technology also makes it possible to conduct one-way interviews using video, which are essentially discussions without real-time interaction. And yet, the most commonly used method for making hiring decisions is interviewing. For some reason the notion that skills and behaviors can be evaluated without skill tests or assessments – but through a discussion – has become the norm.

Maybe it’s because of a lack of resourcing. Maybe we trust our intuition more than third party methods. Or maybe it’s a lack of awareness. But it doesn’t make a lot of sense because interviews don’t predict performance. They typically focus on understanding what someone did in the past or discussing what they claim to be able to do, without proof.

Can interviews nevertheless play a valuable role in the hiring process? Interviews should be used to get to know a preferred candidate after their skills and behaviors have been validated. Only candidates who have already demonstrated they can do they job should be interviewed. That would allow for a much more valuable interviewing experience, and a far better use of everyone’s time. Unfortunately, that is not normally the case.

Can we combine skill testing, pre-employment assessment and interviewing?

A strong hiring process will combine reliable insights about a candidate’s ability to do the job and their expected behavior with high-quality human interaction. In theory, this could involve a skill test, some form of pre-employment assessment and an interview. It very much depends on the type of role, and the candidate experience the company wants to deliver.

Hiring is not a “one size fits all” endeavour. Every situation is different. But understanding what each evaluation method can achieve and, more importantly, what it will not achieve, will go a long way to helping companies build hiring robust processes.    

 

AUTHOR

Omer Molad
Making hiring about merit, not background | Co-founder and CEO of Vervoe

Sell! | No BS Hiring Advice


If you’re not selling your opportunity to everyone you interview, you are taking a big risk come offer time . . .and beyond.

Summary

Let me tell you a quick story about an old client of mine many years ago. It was a startup firm that quickly grew with a thousand people. When they interviewed people, they had two goals in mind. Number one was to hire someone for their jobs, of course. But number two was they wanted to make sure that when people walked out, they thought to themselves, "Man, I hope I get this job." And, if they didn't get the job, they were so disappointed.
"This firm was terrific. You know, they've got high standards. They present themselves extremely well. They seem to do great work. I really wish I'd gotten that job," they would think to themselves. Is that the way people leave your office? Seriously, is that how they leave your firm after an interview?
No? You're missing a great opportunity. The fact of the matter is, when a potential hire comes to your firm, it's an opportunity to sell the organization to them, make them fall in love. Because, after all, if they're not in love, the likelihood of their taking the job unless they're desperate is somewhere near non-existent, right?
So often, whether you, in HR, are preoccupied, or you, as a manager, are just thinking of 27 different things, you're not focused on the one thing that you need . . . actually, two things that you need to.
Number one is one that you're doing and that is you're evaluating and assessing their knowledge but, the second thing, is making them want to join you for all you're doing, all this work and taking all this time to evaluate someone and, if you make an offer and they're not interested because you kind of turned them off with your disinterest, what good was all this?
So, I want to encourage you take some time to sell the opportunity. It's not just what you say . . . you know, if you say "we got this job here, it's a nice opportunity," and you don't seem passionate about it, if you've appeared disinterested because you've been saying this over and over again to every person who walks in, that's not selling.
Selling is about personality and making them want to join you, making them feel good about joining you, even if that's not your eventual choice. Remember, in this age of social media, where it's so easy for people to share complaints, it's also easy for them to share positive experiences with people.
"I interviewed with his firm. Wow, what a great environment this is!" They can talk about that ad infinitum with their friends and colleagues Don't miss this opportunity because it really will make hiring a lot easier for you and for your firm.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

 

Subscribe And Give This Video A Thumbs Up If You Found It Helpful.

No BS Hiring Advice

Trends in Staffing | No BS Hiring Advice


In this video, I refer to an article written by Dr. John Sullivan about the top trend in recruiting for the coming year.

Summary

This is a video that I'm doing calling attention to an article by Dr. John Sullivan on eremedia.com or you may also find it on ere.net where he talks about the number one trend toward going into recruiting for the new year. He goes through a variety of them, but this is the number one trend he believes is going to be important for a company. I think it's valid. It's a shift toward database decision making in recruiting.
Why? Because, lately, in recruiting, he says everyone's gotten good at collecting metrics. Unfortunately, after collecting them, no one ever does anything with them. Here's his best practices for creating a database decision model.
He says data is going to reveal which sources provide and produce quality applicants and hires and will also reveal which types of interviews and interview questions best identify future top performance.
In a previous trend, he recognizes that the cost of a bad hire is extraordinary. DUH! Like you know all recruiting firms have spoken about this for years but no one pays attention to us and hopefully you'll notice this trend and not take a "penny wise, pound foolish" and start to measure where your top people are coming from.
It can can also show you whether your references are an accurate predictor of future performances because, these days, half of new hires are coming from employee referrals. It can also show you your new hire failure rate which can also average as high as 46%. It reveals which recruiters and hiring managers routinely produce the highest quality hires and which do not. It also reveals which single factor has the highest impact on hiring success.
For example, he offers the relationship with the hiring manager. Data can be useful but it's also an examination of the past and it doesn't take into consideration the future. They're going to be new factors and new avenues for exploration for where you find retail and right now it's heavily referral oriented great saves you money. It's also like getting a testimonial from someone who works at your firm as to the quality of this individual. That's terrific but in the future, there may be new ways you have to be open to them as well. It started measuring the success of these techniques and not just simply the old ones.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Pressure Interviews That Cross The Line | No BS Hiring Advice


A woman shared her experience on Twitter about a “pressure interview” that crossed the line. Head your team off at the pass.

Summary

Today, I want to talk to those of you hire and tell you a story that made it online. As a reminder to you. Now, I worked in search for more than 40 years and stories like the one I'm going to tell you are not unusual. You may think it's unusual, but it really isn't. And here's what happened.
There's a woman in the UK who did an interview. Now, obviously I'm US based and if you think this is unique to their culture, not at all. She goes on an interview, spend two hours that she describes as being grueling, grueling, tough interviews. That's fine, but it was abusive and the CEO basically called her a variety of critical things, criticized the way she sat, basically described her to her face is an underachiever, told her work really wasn't that a good and a variety of other things that were designed to take this 22 year old woman and take her down a peg.
Yeah, right. That was a smart move. At the end of the day, they make an offer, which she initially accepts, and then has the wisdom to turn down.
In the rejection letter. She described herself as being someone who's just come out of an abusive relationship and realized that this was much the same type of thing, that she was being psychologically abused by the CEO of this firm . . . and that should never be be tolerated.
Folks. I'm just going to simply say, if you don't think that the people in your organization can do this, again, I worked in search for a long time, and it doesn't have to be the CEO of a firm. It can be very simply the people who were doing the evaluation interview.
I heard of people who were interviewing developers who would say things like, "You are a moron," or "you're dead wrong," even though they were right. Now, some will defend that the idea was to toughen the person up,, have them argue intentionally but we live in an age of social media. This this tweet was retweeted almost one hundred thousand times. Do you understand what the impact is of behavior like this is on your recruiting?
You need to train people who are involved in the process to ensure that they behave like normal people, and because they're having a bad day, don't take it out on someone else.
In the case of the CEO, he eventually got around to apologizing online. "I had no intention of humiliating someone." Well, tell me what your intention was when you criticized the way someone is sitting and say her work isn't any good? What was the intention there? It makes no sense.
Some will call this a pressure interview. This is an abusive interview. If you're in HR, if you're a hiring manager, you want to safeguard against people on your staff behaving in any sort of way like this. Take 15 minutes. Just have a quick conversation or send an email out to them and simply say, "I just want to be clear about something (I'm doing this manager to staff). If I ask you to interview, I want you to focus in on a couple things to evaluate and assess. We want everyone to walk out wanting the job, wanting to join our firm (because that is what you want, right)." Even if you don't want them you want them to want it so that in this way if they're turned down they can say to their friends, "I really wanted that one; that was a great opportunity." That helps with your branding.
But this kind of pressure thing . . . it's so 1950s! Is that the way you want to be seen?

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate yourJeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon. offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

 

No BS Hiring Advice

Faking Interviews | No BS Hiring Advice


Desperate people do desperate thing and for some people faking interviews is occuring more often. Here is an example of a faked interview

Summary

Now, this is a video for employers and third party recruiters. I think the time has come where, if you were only doing phone interviewing of people, you are making a mistake. Let me just explain. I'll have a link to this video in the show notes.
I'll just simply say there's an exquisite video of a young man doing a technical interview via Skype. And he's got his headphones on and he's attempting to lip sync the answers to questions he's being asked, but it's really clear very quickly that he's not answering the questions. Someone else has been patched in and is attempting to answer and what he's doing is trying to mouth the words . . . but you see him lip synching too long, too short, and the interviewer, by being able to see him, is able to discern very quickly that this is a ruse.
Folks, this is happening more and more often. It happens in lots of different ways and places. I remember a story that a client told me about a drug test that was administered. White potential new employee. African American doing the drug test for the white employee. He had to sign for what he did and he put a splint on his hand and saw the signature of the white employee and attempted to sign. They recorded that there was a splint on his hand to explain the difference . . . But they didn't know the race of the person they were drug testing. They certainly saw this as an African American man, but they didn't know the difference. Fraud is going on regularly and, as people become desperate at different times, they go to greater extremes in order to deceive you.
I'm telling you more and more of you need to switch to video interviewing so you can catch this because, it's kind of like the old movies . . . I don't even think though they're on video anymore, but in the 50s and 60s, there used to be these Hercules movies, or Samson movies that were dubbed from Italian into English. So, you'd see this, you know, guy in, you know, a beefy guy doing the Hercules part and he's being dubbed and it's kind of like he's talking in Italian and it's been dubbed into English and the mouth is still going in Italian all the words are coming out in English. That's what happens when movies are dubbed. Well, in effect, candidates are being dubbed, too. You don't want to be talking to a person who needs to be dubbed.
So, I'll simply say, switch to video interviews. If they don't like it, too bad, too bad! Minimally, what you can do is use one of the services . . . you can find it. I'm not here to offer up services to you. Just look for video interviewing services on Google, pick one that makes sense for your organization, provide them with prepared questions and have people answer them. They can do it on their phone. They can do it on an iPad or another device. They can do it on their computer but have them answer questions and, if you notice that they're going (I describe it like the dubbed Hercules movie), at the end, as happens with this guy, you know you have a problem.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

 

No BS Hiring Advice

You Are Missing Different Groups in Your Recruiting | No BS Hiring Advice


In this video, I point our 3 different groups most organizations do a terrible job of sourcing

Summary

I'm going to talk with those of you who are involved with hiring. And I'll start by saying, I worked in search for more than 40 years, and filled more than 1200 full time positions, plus consulting assignments. I now coach people, so I'm not you're trying to sell you recruiting business. What I'm here to do is to offer some very simple advice in a no BS kind of way because your hiring managers are screwing themselves out of their ignorance and their bigotry. So, there are a number of different groups that could be interviewed and could be hired and do great work for you.
I'll start off with the one group that, time and again, delivers results but for many of your managers, they're worried about nonsense. That group is older workers --seniors, individuals who are close to retirement age, whatever that means these days. They are generally older than the hiring manager and the story they tell themselves is that these people will not take direction, they're burned out tired has-beens. That's a simple way of putting it, right?
And it's a lie that they're telling themselves and you and HR needs to confront it because you're staring at productivity issues. You're staring at them, complaining that they're not seeing enough people and demographics are such that they can take 22 year olds from Gen Z who have no experience. They can do that. Their work ethic is very similar to the older generation.
I'll simply say that, you know, the studies that I've been seeing point to Gen Z as being like a clone of the Baby Boomers in terms of their work ethic. So what's the issue with the Boomers? if you're liking Gen Z, the Boomers actually have experience, they will take direction and they'll work hard. They're not rushing out to retirement because they can't afford it. So, that's one group that you're hiring managers should pay attention to.
Another one, for certain types of positions, are ex-offenders. You know, people who've been incarcerated. Now ex-offenders, as long as they're involved with social services, as well, will work very hard, do a lot of good work. They need certain types of training, and then they need certain types of supports in your organization. But it's a population that gets ignored and often can do jobs that you really need people to do because these are not people who've been trained for accounting and finance or technology. They are labor for a lot of your organizations. Don't neglect ex-offenders, even if you have to pay to train them because once they've trained, they will be loyal.
The third group is moms who are returning from maternity or raising kids, for that matter. This is a workforce that wants to work, has decided that they're ready to work and there are a lot of jobs that they can do and, as an HR professional, you need to fill jobs, right? And your hiring managers want very simple behaviors out of people. What's the cost of training to get someone up to speed on things that they did before? Not all that expensive believe it or not.
I don't care what field this person worked in. They can do the job with a certain amount of training. You can also, if you're paying for training, get them to commit to work for your organization for a certain period of time or be obligated to pay the firm back for that training. It's not difficult. Just don't go crazy with . . . "You have to work for us for three years or else you will have to pay us back."
Nonsense. Absolute nonsense. Don't do that kind of crap. Just amortize it out over the course of a year. If they leave the within the year. They owe you the money back.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

No BS Hiring Advice

Preparation Isn’t Just for Job Hunters | No BS Hiring Advice


Particularly if you are new to hiring, preparation is critical to your evaluation process.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow me at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn http://linkd.in/1momsP9
for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube http://bit.ly/13EP9fa
for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Visit <a href=”http://
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; there’s a lot more there

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Pay what you want for my books about job hunting http://bit.ly/1xWoiiO

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us

No BS Hiring Advice

End Interviews the Right Way | No BS Hiring Advice


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to end interviews in any way that does not lead people on.

Summary

The advice I'm giving today is about one of those small things that can be very damaging to your organization and that is how you end things with a candidate.
Now the history behind this episode comes from an interview I had with someone. It was a third interview with an area manager for a firm, done by phone, and at the end of the interview, the hiring manager goes, "Well,. the next step is going to be we're going to bring you into New York to meet with my boss. We'll fly you in for this interview." Two days later. I get a call from HR. We're not interested. The manager didn't think she was a good fit.
Okay, firms are entitled to turn someone down, quite obviously. That's not the issue. The issue is the impact of what he said at the end of that interview. Number one was to give this woman an idea, and a reasonable idea, that she was going on to further interviews. If you're not interested don't say stuff like that. All you have to do is to say, "we're going to get back to the recruiter and we'll let you know in the next couple of days."
Now, I'll simply say that if you're going to reject people, if you're not sure, make a statement like that. Matter of fact. I think that should be the common practice for all job interviews. At the end of the interview, you say, "we're going to get back to the recruiter" or "We'll get back to HR and will let you know our thoughts in the next day or two," because, otherwise, if you say stuff like this, the impact is you have an annoyed job applicant and if you think people don't express themselves on the web you're mistaken.
You guys are looking for information on the web about Job applicants. Well, job applicants are looking for information about you and when they hear stuff like this or worse, obviously the impact is to be reluctant to interview and reluctant to trust you and you don't want that to happen. You don't want this kind of publicity out there, criticizing your organization, especially especially for someone you might not be interested in.
So, keep it simple. All you have to do is say, at the end of the interview, we're going to get back to HR and will be in touch the next day or two

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.