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No BS Hiring Advice

Hiring and Interviewing Mistakes That Are Made WAY Too Often | No BS Hiring Advice


I talk about a few of the mistakes both HR professionals and hiring managers make WAY too often.

Summary

This is a video that's designed to speak to hiring organizations, but HR and hiring managers, neither of us are immune to making these mistakes. I want you to hear that loud and clear. Don't point fingers at the other. I'm telling you, I've seen it out of both sides. So here's a couple of things that I have run into pretty regularly, that organizations do way too often.

So, the first one and this one is particularly grievous, especially in this time of social media is making a promise you can't keep. Now, you know, there are sites where people can be critical and have an audience.

Like when I started recruiting in the 1970s (yes, 1970s), there was no venue, no public forum other than complaining to friends about what's happened. But, now their is. And if you don't think that people share stuff like this, where people are burned, you are sadly mistaken.

As a hiring manager. I know you're desperate to fill a slot and need some help. As an HR professional, I know you've got some metrics and you have a hiring manager and your boss breathing down your neck to fill the job. Don't make a promise you can't keep, that you have no control over because, eventually, it's going to come back to haunt you and your organization.

Another mistake that I see happen (and this one tends to be more about the hiring manager) is hiring someone for the wrong reason. Now, you know, the classic example is Aunt so and so has called you up about their niece or nephew who's a wonderful human being . . . That's a classic example.

But here's another one . . . that colleague of yours who has someone that they networked with, that they've known for a long time who really could do this job and you don't interview them as thoroughly as you do somebody off the street. As a result, you trust their judgement to social proof without putting them through a wringer to evaluate them as thoroughly as you might a stranger. You can't do that.

Just because someone else provides a testimonial doesn't necessarily mean that they're right for you in your particular needs. So, get in there and really assess this person hard and fast and deep, and then make a decision about them. And if you decide not to go with this person, very simply explain to a colleague where the deficiency was. Let's see if they can speak to it because sometimes they'll say, "Oh, you're right. They don't really have that kind of a background. Thanks for bringing that to my attention." They will appreciate your honesty for coming to them directly.

And that, of course, leads to the not conducting a thorough interview by not being prepared. So I know you're multitasking and you're coming out of a meeting and there are four people at your door and there's someone in the reception who is waiting to talk to you. So recognize that you need to just take a minute or two to settle yourself, focus in on this person and focus on the resume

Get clear about the standard questions that you want to ask and, based upon what you hear, the atypical questions, the follow up questions, you might want to be can make sure you cover those points based upon what you see on the resume and the little things that may give your hesitation.

Lastly, a mistake that people make is expected way too much out of their staff. You know, a person comes on board and you expect that an individual to come in, they've got great qualifications, but they've got an emotional side as well . . . and they're not machines and they're not going to work 90 hours a week and make it look good.

Recognize that, sometimes, just like you're exaggerating the job a wee bit, they're exaggerating themselves a wee bit, too. And if you're going to demand superhuman effort from them, and pay them average money, you're barking up the wrong tree and you're going to be disappointed.

There's a lot more variances on that, but you get the idea. At the end of the day, if you expect way too much out of your people, All they do is burn them out, piss them off and make them leave.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

Employer Interviewing Mistakes: Not Seeing People for Who They Are | No BS Hiring Advice


I discuss one of the classic mistakes hiring managers make.

Summary

This is a video in a series that I've been doing about employer interviewing and hiring mistakes and the mistake I'm going to talk with you about is not seeing people for who they really are. That's the influence of bias, both positive and negative bias.
The person who walks in the door, who is . . . I'm going to use bad slang here . . . Drop-dead gorgeous . . . That's male or female. You see them and they are so impressive for their appearance that you go through the questions and . . . Excuse my language . . . Half-assed kind of way and, instead are mesmerized by how good-looking they are.
Conversely, you can also be adversely affected and have a bias toward people who are fat, who looks different than you, dresses poorly because they can't afford a better wardrobe, individuals of all different races, religions, backgrounds . . . And you can justify your decision based upon objective criteria . . . But, if you ask yourself the question, "if this person were drop-dead gorgeous walking in the in the door, would I give them a second chance," if you're honest with yourself, you probably would.
Let me go to the example of the person who's different than you and you perceive them negatively. You have to put your biases aside. You know, this person could be a great intellect, a dedicated individual. You want to hire a team player.? There is no more team player than this individual . . . But you're distracted because of their girth. Why is that? Because you have to get them a bigger chair? So, what? The firm can afford it. If this person is of a different religion or race than you, get to the intellect, get to their knowledge. Understand what makes them tick.
Instead of asking them to tell you about themselves, instead ask the this question instead. "So, as you look back at your life, what brought you to this moment? What was what's your background that had you enter this field and wind up in my office today?"
What you're going to do is learn about the individual and their life holistically. I've spoken about this in another video based upon a podcast called, "Reply All," that was released and made this suggestion then because it makes a lot of sense.
You know, there are things about a person and their life that you'll find out by asking them my question or the question was offered on "Reply All," instead of tell me about yourself. You'll find out about what brought them to this point.
What their training was. What their education is. How they wound up and being the first in their family to have this experience or how they stumbled into this career, but it got adopted by someone who trained the heck out of them.
I remember there's a guy in New York I met many years ago who used to adopt . . . I'm putting that in air quotes . . .A number of young Inner city kids and train the heck out of them in network engineering. He had a data center in his brownstone and would bring the kids in and train the heck out of them. They would work for him for nothing because they loved the education that they got and they all went on to great fields.
Did any of them have a comp sci degree? No. None of them even had degrees . . . But if you look at their resume you'd go, "where have they been working? No degree. Delete."
But you'd find out if you actually talked to them about how they were involved with providing communications to the Baltic Nations at times when the Soviet Union, the old Soviet Union was trying to block them from being able to have international communications or how each of them broke the networking blockades that existed on their banking systems that the old Soviets had Implemented and what their part of it was. You'd never know that unless you actually talk to them and asked the question like the one I'm suggesting.
So, take the time to get to know someone. Don't just simply respond impulsively and reflexively which basically involves no thought. It's a conditioned learning response that's keeping you from getting the person that you really want and need.
So, get out there. Experiment a little bit. If I'm wrong from your vantage point, no harm. no foul, right? No one gets hurt. You're still going to get the same information and you may still reject them, but following my lead here, you're going to learn a lot more about a person and their background and see really from that story much better than you'll find through your standard questions about fit

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

No BS Hiring Advice

Interviewing Mistakes By Hiring Managers | No BS Hiring Advice


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses two types of interviewing mistakes too many managers make.

Summary

I'm back with more no BS hiring advice to help you as an HR professional, hiring manager or small to mid-sized business owner be more effective with your hiring process. Now, one of the most . . . It's actually a combo mistake . . . There's parallel mistakes that you as an interviewer may make . . . And you'll understand what I mean in a second . . . One mistake that you tend to make is your questions aren't insightful enough and often that's because you're not as well prepared to evaluate and assess what you need. You know, I can say to yourself. "I need such and such," but you haven't figured out how to evaluate for that as of yet and, as a result, the questions you tend to ask are superficial. Thus, you don't get enough information from the person you're interviewing to really make sense for yourself. As a result, and you'll see now how a piggybacks, as a result of not asking deep enough questions, what often happens is you start to talk about yourself. On one of my job hunter videos, I point out that the more you talk-- meaning you-- the more you like them because you're talking about yourself .You have this emotional transference as they say in psychoanalytic terminology to the candidate because you're talking about a pleasant subject for yourself. Your job is to evaluate and assess and determine whether this person's qualified. Fit. I'm not as big a fan of because most of you aren't equipped to evaluate fit other than you like this person and you think so and so in the Department's going to like them ,too. Even if you bring so and so over for the interview, they don't know how to interview any better than you do .Sometimes even worse! So, the result winds up being you wind up that having these mishires that are very costly. Again, get into details with people about what they've done, how they went about doing it and, if there are objective measures of qualifications, ask lots of questions and/or, for less experienced people, giving them written tests that will allow you to scope out whether they have the knowledge that's involved. Not doing that has you contributing to the statistics about more than half of all hiring managers regret hires that they've made.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice Radio

One of The Biggest Mistakes Managers Make When Interviewing | No BS Hiring Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/nobshiringadvice/2016/01/27/one-of-the-biggest-mistakes-managers-make-when-interviewing

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses one of the biggest mistakes hiring managers make when they interview someone.

Summary

This is a mistake that way too many employers make. And, you know, I'll just describe it very simply from something that happened with a candidate that I represented to a client not too long ago (IMORE () ) . What happened for this person is that went on an interview, they were asked two or three questions and, then, the manager went off on a monologue for a half hour.
They talked about the environment. They talked about what they were doing. They talked about themselves, their background and the person was asked basically to sit there and listen while this person talked for 20-25 minutes. Now, I wasn't there. Maybe this is a slight exaggeration, but when someone tells me they were sitting there for 20 minutes nodding their head and trying to fight off a yawn, It means something to me. So, whether I was twenty totwenty five or ten or fifteen, it's way too long.
Your job as a hiring managers or an HR professionals or a small business owner is to ask great questions. In order to deduce whether or not this person fits what you're looking for. Not fit's your company because you don't have the skills or ability to do that.
Let's not kid ourselves. You may think that Ramesh can't fit in with . . . I don't know Win or Susan or whomever but, the fact of the matter is, if they're qualified ,everyone will find a way to fit as long as this person is not a wild individual and, even then, they may be a great hire for you because he don't want to have too many people who are identical in their thinking working in the same department.
Where do you get good input then? Sometimes you want a renegade but that's for another time. I'll just simply say if you spend a lot of your interview talking and not enough time asking questions and listening, all you're doing is projecting attributes onto this person without really knowing if they're qualified or not.
Again, prepare standardized questions in advance. So you have a baseline for what you want to investigate in order to determine if they're qualified. You can ask follow-up questions that aren't on script in order to explore more, some questions that might test competency or, perhaps, a written exam or something that they can do online. . . . But I prefer they do it in front of you kind of thing because, you know, this may be a shock to you but sometimes people lie. They have a friend take the test for them, but, no matter. Standardized questioning in advance. S spend more time listening than talking.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

 

No BS Hiring Advice

Stupid Hiring Mistakes: Not Preparing or Coaching Hiring Managers | No BS Hiring Advice


Another video in my series of dumb mistakes employers make when interviewing.

Summary

Hi, I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. I'm referred to as The Big Game Hunter because I coach people to play their professional game and their personal game bigger. I want to talk with you as an HR professional, in particular, and it can apply to hiring managers, as well who sometimes have staff people do part of the interview, to talk with you about one of the . . . I can't call anything else . . . Stupid interviewing mistakes that you as an organization are making. And that is you really don't spend time understanding how people should be interviewed in order to evaluate them for your organization. Now, I want to start by saying, I have a bias against interviewing for fit because you're not using any sort of way that objectively measures fit for either your current staff or for outsiders.
So, in not using a standardized approach to evaluate for fit, I think you're prone to infecting the process with your own biases and, thus, hire people just like you, rather than bring any sort of diversity into your organization. Now, that's where I start off by acknowledging my own opinions from my 40 plus years. Now. Let's go further.
For you as an HR professional, when you have a hiring manager who's interviewing for a position, have you ever sat in on the interviews to see what questions they're asking that willobjectively measure whether an individual's qualified to do the job and some of the tangents that they go down that might distract them from the real crux of what the evaluation should be.
Have you ever noticed how bias sometimes injects itself into the interview? I suspect not .Usually what HR does is trust that the hiring manager really can evaluate for what they're looking for and they don't really . . . They're not really aware of some of the rat holes that they go down that, shall we say . . . Again, let me drop the bias term here that distract them from reallyqualifying people effectively. It's why the these managers have more turnover than others. It's why these managers often have dysfunctional groups and have to replace staff that are trying to move people out with regularity and many other tip-offs that these managers aren't as good at interviewing as others.
But, these are two of the obvious places where bad hires and bad interviewing really creeps in. For you as a hiring manager who sometimes has staff people interview,have you ever asked them to qualify for very specific things and then asked them the questions that they might ask because you may find that as a part of the reason that you'll get in turndowns on your offers is because their nerves or their uncertainty about what to really ask for to satisfy you Is causing the job applicant to have doubts about joining a team like this.
So ,your willingness to prepare staff and explain why it is you want them to ask a particular question will go a long way toward avoiding some of these unfortunate misunderstandings. And before you dismiss the applicant for doing that ,you would react the same way if you had someone lame sitting in front of you. you would question the rational behavior of this organization to put out someone so incapable in front of you to evaluate you.
So, take a little time with your staff to coach them about what to ask, why you want them to ask it, what you're looking for in the way of an answer and that's going to go a long way towards solving some of these behavioral quirks that cause job applicants to really doubt the effectiveness of your team, the quality and caliber of you team and of your organization,
I'm Jeff Altman. I think you'll find this helpful if you apply this and you'll see some loose ends in your organization.
By the way, there's a lot of information on my website, which is eee.TheBigGamHunter.us. Click the tab on top that says blog and look for no BS hiring advice. There's a lot of information that will help you there.
Hope you have a great day. Take care.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

 

No BS Hiring Advice

Your Biggest Mistake When Interviewing Someone | No BS Hiring Advice


In this video, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter Speaks about the biggest mistake HR professionals hiring managers and small business owners make when hiring someone.

 

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

 

Bad Employer Behavior | No BS Hiring Advice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter attempts to discourage you from engaging in some of the offensive and rude hiring practices some employers engage in.

 

 

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

 

 

Interviewing Mistakes By Hiring Managers

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses two types of interviewing mistakes too many managers make.

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Email me if your firm is trying to hire someone.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Pay what you want for my books about job search

Subscribe to TheBigGameHunterTV on YouTube for advice about job hunting and hiring. Like videos, share and comment.

Trying to hire someone? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us