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Jobs for Retirees Who Want to Take It a Little Easier

Jobs for Retirees Who Want to Take It a Little Easier | JobSearchTV.com


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In this video, I suggest work for retirees beyond “continue working in the job you previously worked in.”

Summary

Today, I thought I would talk with those of you who are retirees who are considering doing some version of work about different kinds of jobs or careers that you could enter into, in order to be in contact with people, make some money, stuff along those lines.
I want to start by saying, I specifically titled this as "who want to take it a little easier," because you can obviously continue doing the kind of work you've done throughout your entire career, work on a full time basis and continue on. But I want to differentiate it with "a little bit easier." So here are a couple of things that you might consider.
The first one is freelancing . . . and freelancing is hard work. You'll hear me say that with a number of things There's a responsibility that comes with freelancing and to appeal to a client and make sure that they're happy. But, you can freelance at the work that you've done previously, and be able to turn up some interesting work and there are sites like freelancer, or upwork, where you can find gigs along those lines, as well as on Craigslist in your local town. So again, consider freelancing.
Number two is you could be a substitute teacher, or teach part time. Now, I'm not talking necessarily about the school system although with some teaching, that's exactly what it is. But part time there are programs at community colleges, there are programs and schools of different sorts, where you might consider teaching. It's hard work. So, you know, again, I'm going to keep saying that where I think it's appropriate.
You could be a house sitter or a caretaker for someone who has more than one home. So, for example, you know, the town I live in, there are people who have homes here. They have homes elsewhere. They spend part the year here and spend part of the year there. They want to have someone check in on their home. You can either live there or you can start a business where you're checking in according to a schedule to make sure no pipes have burst, no one's broken in . . . stuff along those lines, in order to ensure people that their home is well cared for.
You can work at a resort. That’s one of my favorite ones on this list. And there are a variety of different professions that she could do at a resort where, and this is going to double up with one later on, you could function as a concierge and book tickets for people. You could work at a front desk, you know, you could do this at a resort, you could do this at a hotel. Both of them have similar types of careers, where you could do this kind of work. It doesn't have to be for major hours, but you can put in time working in a resort or the hotel and doing this kind of work.
You could do tax preparation, which obviously has a busy season associated with it. There's a tax person I know locally, and she is busy. From I'd say February through October, it's a half of year of really focused work where she's putting in a lot of hard hours. She's in her 70s, generally good health but the rest of the year, it's not quite as crunch worthy, if you understand what I mean.
You can do pet sitting, you can start a pet sitting business in your area where people may not want to walk the dog, or they want their cats to be fed while they're away. You can set up a service where you're doing this for people and get paid for it.
You could obviously work retail and you're on your feet a lot. Seehat may not be a lot of fun. You could be on event staff. I know when I lived in New York, I would go to the theater. There were the people who would seat you and give you a Playbill. They'd be able to serve you in that role, answer questions, enjoy the show, eventually get bored with a show or the performance but event staff is a role that you can do. You could do that at stadiums, where you're seating people, as well.
Lastly, there's the classic driver. These days with Uber and Lyft, there's lots of opportunities for people to drive. It's not easy work and you're dealing with the public, Not all the time is going to be particularly nice. But it's clearly a profession that people who are older are doing in order to earn income.
So hope you found this helpful. I'm not endorsing any of these, you have to know yourself to know what makes sense. You have to know what makes sense in your local community because you're not going to be traveling hours to do this kind of work, right?

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1400 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

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No BS Hiring Advice

You Are Missing Different Groups in Your Recruiting | No BS Hiring Advice


In this video, I point our 3 different groups most organizations do a terrible job of sourcing

Summary

I'm going to talk with those of you who are involved with hiring. And I'll start by saying, I worked in search for more than 40 years, and filled more than 1200 full time positions, plus consulting assignments. I now coach people, so I'm not you're trying to sell you recruiting business. What I'm here to do is to offer some very simple advice in a no BS kind of way because your hiring managers are screwing themselves out of their ignorance and their bigotry. So, there are a number of different groups that could be interviewed and could be hired and do great work for you.
I'll start off with the one group that, time and again, delivers results but for many of your managers, they're worried about nonsense. That group is older workers --seniors, individuals who are close to retirement age, whatever that means these days. They are generally older than the hiring manager and the story they tell themselves is that these people will not take direction, they're burned out tired has-beens. That's a simple way of putting it, right?
And it's a lie that they're telling themselves and you and HR needs to confront it because you're staring at productivity issues. You're staring at them, complaining that they're not seeing enough people and demographics are such that they can take 22 year olds from Gen Z who have no experience. They can do that. Their work ethic is very similar to the older generation.
I'll simply say that, you know, the studies that I've been seeing point to Gen Z as being like a clone of the Baby Boomers in terms of their work ethic. So what's the issue with the Boomers? if you're liking Gen Z, the Boomers actually have experience, they will take direction and they'll work hard. They're not rushing out to retirement because they can't afford it. So, that's one group that you're hiring managers should pay attention to.
Another one, for certain types of positions, are ex-offenders. You know, people who've been incarcerated. Now ex-offenders, as long as they're involved with social services, as well, will work very hard, do a lot of good work. They need certain types of training, and then they need certain types of supports in your organization. But it's a population that gets ignored and often can do jobs that you really need people to do because these are not people who've been trained for accounting and finance or technology. They are labor for a lot of your organizations. Don't neglect ex-offenders, even if you have to pay to train them because once they've trained, they will be loyal.
The third group is moms who are returning from maternity or raising kids, for that matter. This is a workforce that wants to work, has decided that they're ready to work and there are a lot of jobs that they can do and, as an HR professional, you need to fill jobs, right? And your hiring managers want very simple behaviors out of people. What's the cost of training to get someone up to speed on things that they did before? Not all that expensive believe it or not.
I don't care what field this person worked in. They can do the job with a certain amount of training. You can also, if you're paying for training, get them to commit to work for your organization for a certain period of time or be obligated to pay the firm back for that training. It's not difficult. Just don't go crazy with . . . "You have to work for us for three years or else you will have to pay us back."
Nonsense. Absolute nonsense. Don't do that kind of crap. Just amortize it out over the course of a year. If they leave the within the year. They owe you the money back.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1300 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

No BS Hiring Advice
No BS Hiring Advice

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.