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NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Should I Apply for a Job At Half My Previous Salary? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/30/should-i-apply-for-a-job-at-half-my-previous-salary-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1271 Should I apply for a job at half the salary I once earned given I’m almost 60 and the options are slim?

Summary

Here's a question I received through quora.   I want to read the full question..

"Should apply for job at half the salary I once earned, given that I'm almost 60 and the options are slim?"

We don't know what this person does professionally;  we just know that they don't have choices.

So I get a look at a few scenarios.  You make $150,000 per year And want to look at a job paying $75,000 per year.  You are a $200,000 a year person  looking at a job paying $100,000 per year.  You are a $100,000 a year person looking at a job paying  50.

Here's the reality to it.  In most of these scenarios, you're not qualified to do the job  at a lower level, nor firm is going to hire you because they are not going to trust whether or not  you are going to jump ship when the market for what you do gets better.

I want to help you and, I have said this in videos that I've done, if you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume.  If you are getting interviews and not invited back, the problem is you don't interview as well as you think you do.  If you are being invited back for 2nd interviews but not getting job offers, you don't have good relationship skills with senior professionals.  Lastly,  if the situation  is that you are getting offers are coming in  lower than what you wanted, you may not be the 1st choice and they are basically saying, "Screw it.  Let's give him a shot and see if he will come in at a lesser price."

It's easy to blame the market Again, we don't know what you do..  Perhaps, you don't have skills that are particularly viable. After all, you may be a $50,000 a year person looking at jobs paying $25,000 per year. That's possible, for example, in social work where you may be a manager at an agency, and are now looking at positions as a caseworker.  You can do that.  You will probably need some refresher because you have been doing oversight for people and haven't been sitting opposite someone Doing case management for a long time.

Recognize that, as a more experienced person, you may no longer have the qualifications  to do the staff level position and you are going to need to be proactive to get the skills up to speed in order to be effective.

So, again, you can do it, but it is not likely to work.

You also say that the opportunities are relatively slim..  I am going to work with another assumption here.

You are passively bringing age discrimination into the conversation and you are using that as the excuse for why you are not getting hired.   It is certainly possible, but, more than likely,, you are not selling yourself real well when you are meeting with the younger manager, either male or female. You are looking across the desk and thinking, "Shit!  They are 30 years old.  They are not going to be interested in me." That's going on in your subconscious and, unfortunately, that's a mistake. There are ways to deal with that issue  but you are not going  into the interview "all in."

That's what you need to be.  All in in these situations.

Hear me out.  Try it.   Go all in.  Push yourself. Don't cop to the belief that it's 60 you're not employable.  I speak from the perspective of  being older than you are and  have worked in search for more than 40 years.  People  would hire me in a heartbeat because they know how talented and successful I am. On an interview, you have to make sure they learn how talented you are.

So get out there  and raise some cane on your interviews and don't use excuses.

Now there was one other phrase that you used – – "options are slim."

You may only be looking on job boards.   When you only look at job boards, there are a finite number of jobs.  You are not out there doing network.  You are staring at the same things coming up over and over again  and saying to yourself, "the options are slim."

In fact, job boards fill, depending upon the statistics you look at, 3 to 6% of all positions..  Recruiters fill another 20 to 25%..  Between the 2, they fill between 30 and 32% of all positions.  The rest are filled by networking.   Of those, approximately 70%, The statistics also say 70% of the 70%  are filled as a result of introductions to people That you didn't know at the beginning of the job search.

You have to go network. You need to talk to people and be referred  to absolute strangers and practice doing informational interviews and practice networking. Get out there.  No excuses.  Don't surrendering to this,, "oh woe is me,," attitude that is implicit in your question. Get hungry again.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

Over 50? Over 60: Your Unique Job Search Problems & How to Solve Them | JobSearchTV.com


I discuss a few unique issues that relate to you and your job search.

Summary

So, I just want to start off by saying there are unique issues that come with being an older work. Yes, ageism is an issue, but a lot of the issues that job hunters have who are over 50 (and certainly over 60) relate to the fact that a lot of you have gotten sloppy about so much, you don't really feel like doing it, and it oozes out of your pores.

You don't have the same drive. You don't have the same determination. Frankly, you don't put in smart effort in order to find work. So, yes, I am going to blame the victim here because at the end of the day, you are responsible for all of your outcomes. You can blame ageism to your hearts content, but you still need to find the position.

There is a way that you can short-circuit all of this and that is to start a business, to become a consultant, because, in the case of business owners, in the case of consultants who are operating at a high level like interim roles, looking to be in an interim C level executive for organization, experience is valued.

So, you were brought in in order to be the pro, to do it for a fixed period of time and then leave. So adopting those kind of positions, whether it's starting a business or being an interim exec for a role is a way of short-circuiting the process. .

However, some of the same pointers still apply even to you. And the 1st 2 are kind of linked.

Number 1 is stay fit. I will speak for myself. It's been hard to take off weight period it's been hard to look good. I have gotten fat. I have clothes that the fit me extremely well and a lot of people I talked to don’t. So, I'm at the gym regularly I (right now, I am getting over and injury but still I'm at the gym regularly working out). I sweat. I lift weights. I push myself. You need to do stuff like that plus have your wardrobe do things that call attention to you from a positive perspective, that don’t give people a reason to go, “How old is that that outfit he's wearing? Or, is she wearing something that is from the 70s?”

You know how people are? They get so dismissive. If you don't believe me get on Facebook, again, and take a look at some of the things that people post that are so snarky. So, just be aware of your appearance because that has an effect.

Another thing is practice your skills. Do it at home. You just make the effort to make sure that you don't get sloppy with how you present your knowledge. So, a lot of people I know have been doing their job for so long and so well that they don't have to talk about it well. And they get lazy with. What I will call, “current events,” within their field. You talk to someone 20 years younger than you, it rolls off the tongue so smoothly.. It may not happen that way for you if you practice.

You might also consider, in your presentation, without of alluding to your age by talking about the grandkids, for example. You can talk about the benefits of maturity and your life experience in supporting the lead person or providing access to certain skills and life experiences that a younger worker hasn’t.

You have been there, you've done a lot. It doesn't make you burned out or tired. But what it does do is help you avoid some of the problems, the less experienced worker might not know., So, emphasize some of those attributes when your interview.

I also want to mention networking. Networking is extremely important for you in the value of your network is far greater than the younger workers network. You know senior executives. You know people who are in a position to hire and who can introduce you to other people who can introduce you to roles. So, get out there and talk to people that you know and don't just sit back on your laurels.

The last thing is the tendency that the those of you who are 50 and over have not to take as many interviews. I want to encourage, especially when you 1st getting back in the job search, get out there and take more interviews, even if it's a job that you would never take, even if the commute is too far, because you are going to need some practice. Even if you been a role where you have hired, now you are the other side of the desk period you need to put yourself in the position to practice interviewing so that you don't screw up jobs that really matter.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Advice for Baby Boomers | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/04/advice-for-baby-boomers-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1246 I was asked a series of questions in advance to an interview for a podcast that, I believe offers great advice for Boomers.

Summary

I have been invited to be a guest on a podcast dealing that supports an audience of baby boomers and they asked me a few questions, in advance since I’m going to be speaking about job hunting. Since it's dealing with Boomers, they asked some questions targeted to Boomers and I thought some of this would be very helpful for my audience.

So, the first question’s how is working with Boomers different?

The biggest challenge of working with Boomers is how easily they cop to the excuse of ageism in job hunting. “How do I find a job now that I am 60 or 65? I'm going to be interviewed by someone so much younger than me. Boo-Hoo! Boo-hoo! They are going to see me like there mother or father and they are going to reject me.”

My experience is, most the time, Boomers are so confident in themselves and their abilities that they spend no time preparing for interviews. They can’t backup their stories and they are blown away by an interviewer who sees as a fraud, representing knowledge and experience that they can't defend. So, I want to encourage you, first of all, take the time to be prepared for interviews. Don’t go out there and wing it.

So, the top three tips for Baby Boomers is to (number one) preserve and enhance your network of contacts. I have the belief that the next recession isn't that far away. Certainly, we are closer to it than we are to the last recession. After all, the last one was 2007-2009. It was a huge debacle and now were years later. Do you think we’re six years away from a recession? I don’t. So, if you're in a management role, you are likely to be targeted because, frankly, that's who gets targeted in most of these recessions. You are expensive, the cost of benefits, you are older, it's cheaper to keep people around and if there are five manager supporting 35 people, they may decide that three managers is just enough and to make those three work harder. So, you have to be prepared for what could be a layoff.

So, you network. You get a leg up on your competition for when you are job hunting, and you start proactively activating your network with a bunch of, “hi! How are you,” phone calls. You start acting proactively to enhance your network. Get involved with trade groups, organizations and places where you can develop relationships with people.

Second thing you do is update your resume NOW. Even though you're not looking, it just makes sense to have it ready in case you needed it, rather than in the midst of the crisis you are suddenly trying to think of writing a resume. It’s hard to do it under those circumstances,

You are feeling a lot of pressure. Everyone's asking you questions. You feel like it just doesn't make sense to you. You update it now. You update it every three months.

Last thing is you start conserving capital now so that, in this way, if you are laid off and not ready to retire, you have greater financial flexibility and staying power in your job search. The last recession hurt a lot of people because they were out of work for a long periods of time. You can also, by the way, start a business on the side, using your expertise or using one of the talents in order to create revenue opportunities for yourself. That’s also going to give you staying power.

So, this is my favorite question. What's the biggest challenges or concerns you see Boomers experiencing regarding job search. Boomers, like their older brethren, don't listen, don’t prepare and you become shocked when they been fire you.

“How can they do this to me? I have been so loyal!” Like Michael Corleone says in the Godfather, “it’s business. It's not personal.” So, you have to do things to look after your own interests and do a great job but you also have to act like the CEO of your own business with your family as your board members.

After all, job hunting doesn't have to be hard, difficult or painful, let alone take as long as it usually does. The skills that are needed to find a job are different than the skills needed to do it and they just involve practice in preparation. Whether it's networking, you can get better at networking. Interviewing just requires practice. Resume writing or the willingness to outsource your resume to someone who can write it well … You put things in place now when you're not stressed that will help you in case, suddenly, you are laid off.

So the last question is, “what would you tell a Boomer to do now, today to get started making changes?”

The economy operates in cycles. Although it may feel good now, the fact is another recession's on the way. Being prepared now is smart business. Don't wait until the knock on the door and someone opens it and says, “Can we see in the conference room for a few minutes.”

That's obviously too late to be prepared because you are about to be handed the notification that says you have been let go, what you’re final date is, what the buyout package terms are… all that stuff. You will freak because that's what most people do and understandably. All I’ll say is you have some time now. Get ready now.

As Jim Rohn says so well , either you run the day or the day runs you.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Should I Apply for a Job At Half My Previous Salary? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/30/should-i-apply-for-a-job-at-half-my-previous-salary-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1271 Should I apply for a job at half the salary I once earned given I’m almost 60 and the options are slim?

Summary

Here's a question I received through quora.   I want to read the full question..

"Should apply for job at half the salary I once earned, given that I'm almost 60 and the options are slim?"

We don't know what this person does professionally;  we just know that they don't have choices.

So I get a look at a few scenarios.  You make $150,000 per year And want to look at a job paying $75,000 per year.  You are a $200,000 a year person  looking at a job paying $100,000 per year.  You are a $100,000 a year person looking at a job paying  50.

Here's the reality to it.  In most of these scenarios, you're not qualified to do the job  at a lower level, nor firm is going to hire you because they are not going to trust whether or not  you are going to jump ship when the market for what you do gets better.

I want to help you and, I have said this in videos that I've done, if you are not getting interviews, the problem is your resume.  If you are getting interviews and not invited back, the problem is you don't interview as well as you think you do.  If you are being invited back for 2nd interviews but not getting job offers, you don't have good relationship skills with senior professionals.  Lastly,  if the situation  is that you are getting offers are coming in  lower than what you wanted, you may not be the 1st choice and they are basically saying, "Screw it.  Let's give him a shot and see if he will come in at a lesser price."

It's easy to blame the market Again, we don't know what you do..  Perhaps, you don't have skills that are particularly viable. After all, you may be a $50,000 a year person looking at jobs paying $25,000 per year. That's possible, for example, in social work where you may be a manager at an agency, and are now looking at positions as a caseworker.  You can do that.  You will probably need some refresher because you have been doing oversight for people and haven't been sitting opposite someone Doing case management for a long time.

Recognize that, as a more experienced person, you may no longer have the qualifications  to do the staff level position and you are going to need to be proactive to get the skills up to speed in order to be effective.

So, again, you can do it, but it is not likely to work.

You also say that the opportunities are relatively slim..  I am going to work with another assumption here.

You are passively bringing age discrimination into the conversation and you are using that as the excuse for why you are not getting hired.   It is certainly possible, but, more than likely,, you are not selling yourself real well when you are meeting with the younger manager, either male or female. You are looking across the desk and thinking, "Shit!  They are 30 years old.  They are not going to be interested in me." That's going on in your subconscious and, unfortunately, that's a mistake. There are ways to deal with that issue  but you are not going  into the interview "all in."

That's what you need to be.  All in in these situations.

Hear me out.  Try it.   Go all in.  Push yourself. Don't cop to the belief that it's 60 you're not employable.  I speak from the perspective of  being older than you are and  have worked in search for more than 40 years.  People  would hire me in a heartbeat because they know how talented and successful I am. On an interview, you have to make sure they learn how talented you are.

So get out there  and raise some cane on your interviews and don't use excuses.

Now there was one other phrase that you used – – "options are slim."

You may only be looking on job boards.   When you only look at job boards, there are a finite number of jobs.  You are not out there doing network.  You are staring at the same things coming up over and over again  and saying to yourself, "the options are slim."

In fact, job boards fill, depending upon the statistics you look at, 3 to 6% of all positions..  Recruiters fill another 20 to 25%..  Between the 2, they fill between 30 and 32% of all positions.  The rest are filled by networking.   Of those, approximately 70%, The statistics also say 70% of the 70%  are filled as a result of introductions to people That you didn't know at the beginning of the job search.

You have to go network. You need to talk to people and be referred  to absolute strangers and practice doing informational interviews and practice networking. Get out there.  No excuses.  Don't surrendering to this,, "oh woe is me,," attitude that is implicit in your question. Get hungry again.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com
NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.” 

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Advice for Baby Boomers | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Listen to the full episode here::
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/10/04/advice-for-baby-boomers-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1246 I was asked a series of questions in advance to an interview for a podcast that, I believe offers great advice for Boomers.

Summary

I have been invited to be a guest on a podcast dealing that supports an audience of baby boomers and they asked me a few questions, in advance since I’m going to be speaking about job hunting. Since it's dealing with Boomers, they asked some questions targeted to Boomers and I thought some of this would be very helpful for my audience.

So, the first question’s how is working with Boomers different?

The biggest challenge of working with Boomers is how easily they cop to the excuse of ageism in job hunting. “How do I find a job now that I am 60 or 65? I'm going to be interviewed by someone so much younger than me. Boo-Hoo! Boo-hoo! They are going to see me like there mother or father and they are going to reject me.”

My experience is, most the time, Boomers are so confident in themselves and their abilities that they spend no time preparing for interviews. They can’t backup their stories and they are blown away by an interviewer who sees as a fraud, representing knowledge and experience that they can't defend. So, I want to encourage you, first of all, take the time to be prepared for interviews. Don’t go out there and wing it.

So, the top three tips for Baby Boomers is to (number one) preserve and enhance your network of contacts. I have the belief that the next recession isn't that far away. Certainly, we are closer to it than we are to the last recession. After all, the last one was 2007-2009. It was a huge debacle and now were years later. Do you think we’re six years away from a recession? I don’t. So, if you're in a management role, you are likely to be targeted because, frankly, that's who gets targeted in most of these recessions. You are expensive, the cost of benefits, you are older, it's cheaper to keep people around and if there are five manager supporting 35 people, they may decide that three managers is just enough and to make those three work harder. So, you have to be prepared for what could be a layoff.

So, you network. You get a leg up on your competition for when you are job hunting, and you start proactively activating your network with a bunch of, “hi! How are you,” phone calls. You start acting proactively to enhance your network. Get involved with trade groups, organizations and places where you can develop relationships with people.

Second thing you do is update your resume NOW. Even though you're not looking, it just makes sense to have it ready in case you needed it, rather than in the midst of the crisis you are suddenly trying to think of writing a resume. It’s hard to do it under those circumstances,

You are feeling a lot of pressure. Everyone's asking you questions. You feel like it just doesn't make sense to you. You update it now. You update it every three months.

Last thing is you start conserving capital now so that, in this way, if you are laid off and not ready to retire, you have greater financial flexibility and staying power in your job search. The last recession hurt a lot of people because they were out of work for a long periods of time. You can also, by the way, start a business on the side, using your expertise or using one of the talents in order to create revenue opportunities for yourself. That’s also going to give you staying power.

So, this is my favorite question. What's the biggest challenges or concerns you see Boomers experiencing regarding job search. Boomers, like their older brethren, don't listen, don’t prepare and you become shocked when they been fire you.

“How can they do this to me? I have been so loyal!” Like Michael Corleone says in the Godfather, “it’s business. It's not personal.” So, you have to do things to look after your own interests and do a great job but you also have to act like the CEO of your own business with your family as your board members.

After all, job hunting doesn't have to be hard, difficult or painful, let alone take as long as it usually does. The skills that are needed to find a job are different than the skills needed to do it and they just involve practice in preparation. Whether it's networking, you can get better at networking. Interviewing just requires practice. Resume writing or the willingness to outsource your resume to someone who can write it well … You put things in place now when you're not stressed that will help you in case, suddenly, you are laid off.

So the last question is, “what would you tell a Boomer to do now, today to get started making changes?”

The economy operates in cycles. Although it may feel good now, the fact is another recession's on the way. Being prepared now is smart business. Don't wait until the knock on the door and someone opens it and says, “Can we see in the conference room for a few minutes.”

That's obviously too late to be prepared because you are about to be handed the notification that says you have been let go, what you’re final date is, what the buyout package terms are… all that stuff. You will freak because that's what most people do and understandably. All I’ll say is you have some time now. Get ready now.

As Jim Rohn says so well , either you run the day or the day runs you.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Over 60 Job Search | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/07/20/over-60-job-search-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1170 Job hunting when you are over 60

[/spp-transcript]

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

I’m Over 60. Should I Hide My Age? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/07/06/im-over-60-should-i-hide-my-age-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1156 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a job hunter about whether they should remove references to age in their resume.

Summary

I received a message this morning from someone with I phone interviewed last week who had a question for me. I thought this would apply to other people beyond him, so, I thought I would as a video, rather than just to write back to him. So, there is the question. For people over 60 and looking for a job, should we consider removing reference to age on the websites, my life etc. to better our chances of getting interviews?

I want to start this by saying that bigotry obviously exists but the particularly, ageism. So, let's recognize that, accept that and make firm squirm. That to me doesn't mean removing items from your resume based upon age, but I think in terms of relevance.

I'm 64 so when I think in terms of things that I did in 1971 when I graduated college or in 1972, this could probably be best put on a resume as a summary. So, as you look at your resume, look at relevance, rather than age as being the variable.

I would take of the year on the degree if I were you? Probably. But the truth of the matter is, what difference does it make? You are going to walk in the door, and are they are going to talk to you and they are going to say, “Gee! It’s an old guy,” if they are going to be bigoted.

If they aren’t going to be bigoted, they are going to look at you for your skills and experience and that's the firm that you want to work for. Why put yourself in the awkward situation? To me, it's always better to reveal and not do stupid interviews with people who are bigoted, rather than put myself in the position where I'm dragging myself to a location to talk to someone who is only can give me a courtesy interview because their biases are so profound that they're not going to listen.

Then, I’m going to have to work hard to last that long period of time and have no chance of getting hired.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Over 60 Job Search | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1170 Job hunting when you are over 60

Summary

Mostly advice I read online for people who are over 60, frankly, it is infuriating. It basically suggested all you want to do is retire, have the easiest job imaginable... You might as well be a Walmart greeter or work for messenger service as a dispatcher. Awful stuff!

Most people I talked to who are over 60 aren't ready to slow down. They are looking for careers in income comparable to what they been earning throughout their lives. What good is it to be advising someone to take a job as a dispatcher? Ridiculous.

Here's what I want to suggest. There are lots of people who know your work who are in different organizations. In this is the prime time for networking. You get yourself out there talking to people who know your work, who you been involved with before who are different organizations. You get yourself a networking groups, You start talking to people. You apply for jobs.

Focus on recent work that you done, not the stuff that you did, let's say, not the stuff. When Richard Nixon or Gerald Ford were president. Focus on work that you done over the last 10 or 15 years of your career in your resume.

Again, network relentlessly. If you're not in shape, make sure you get into shape. Spend a little time at the gym. That's if you're out of work. If you are working at want to change jobs, they look at is like any other job search. You're looking for quality opportunity. You're not looking for someone's third-rate choice..

Don't buy into the bull. You have options out there galore. Yes, it is true that there is ageism and there going to be some firms where their bigoted managers who are good be out to get you. Welcome to the world.

And, that was certainly true when you were 20 and their bigoted managers there who wouldn't give you a shot either. This is just the other end of the curve.

Get yourself out there talking to people. Get yourself out there with responses to ads. Focus on the networking because you have far more options and far more opportunities now with networking than you did when you are beginner.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

I’m Over 60. Should I Hide My Age? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1156 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a job hunter about whether they should remove references to age in their resume.

Summary

I received a message this morning from someone with I phone interviewed last week who had a question for me. I thought this would apply to other people beyond him, so, I thought I would as a video, rather than just to write back to him. So, there is the question. For people over 60 and looking for a job, should we consider removing reference to age on the websites, my life etc. to better our chances of getting interviews?

I want to start this by saying that bigotry obviously exists but the particularly, ageism. So, let's recognize that, accept that and make firm squirm. That to me doesn't mean removing items from your resume based upon age, but I think in terms of relevance.

I'm 64 so when I think in terms of things that I did in 1971 when I graduated college or in 1972, this could probably be best put on a resume as a summary. So, as you look at your resume, look at relevance, rather than age as being the variable.

I would take of the year on the degree if I were you? Probably. But the truth of the matter is, what difference does it make? You are going to walk in the door, and are they are going to talk to you and they are going to say, “Gee! It’s an old guy,” if they are going to be bigoted.

If they aren’t going to be bigoted, they are going to look at you for your skills and experience and that's the firm that you want to work for. Why put yourself in the awkward situation? To me, it's always better to reveal and not do stupid interviews with people who are bigoted, rather than put myself in the position where I'm dragging myself to a location to talk to someone who is only can give me a courtesy interview because their biases are so profound that they're not going to listen.

Then, I’m going to have to work hard to last that long period of time and have no chance of getting hired.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complementary session.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Interviewing and Over 60 | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/05/09/interviewing-and-over-60-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1099 Interviewing when you’re over 60 is different than when you’re younger.

Summary

I want to do a video today for those of you who are over 60 like me and talk with you about differences in interviewing. I'll simply say that there are a few things that come to mind for me when I am coaching more experienced individuals about interviewing.

The 1st is the lack of practice that so many of you engage in when preparing for the interview. It's as though you can walk in and kind of comes your way through the interview without any preparation. You don't review your resume. You don't review how to answer some of the questions that you will be asked. You don't think in advance. You don't research organizations you'll be interviewing with one along the hiring manager. Thus you are kind of "winging it." That's not a smart move on your part. It shows up in many different ways. I will simply say that you are shooting yourself in the foot. Without adequate preparation before you walk in.

The next thing I see a lot of people doing is They are not conscious of some of the nonverbal signals they send out n the course of an interview. As a result, they don't project confidence. They see someone 20 or 30 years they were junior chronologically and, immediately, they feel defeated.

Let me sum up by saying (1) what's the bias against older workers? No energy. Lack of enthusiasm. Stuff along those lines. So you arrive In a purposeful way (not puffed up. Not phony.). Friendly. A competent handshake. Good body language. A smile of confidence as you need someone goes a long way.By the way, that is true for both men and women.Your demeanor sends messages to people about your security with yourself. Send those messages.

Lastly, when you notice significant differences in age between yourself and others, there will always be a point in an interview we can take this head-on. They can use the language of talking about how you are more senior than the job or, "Are you sure that you are going to be happy in a role like this?"Asking a question like this immediately let's you know That that is 1 of their concerns. They are not trying to be nice men or women when asking this question. They just don't think you are going to be happy in the job.

Part of that is, "We are all a team of 30-year-olds here. You are not."

"I have worked with and for people who are far less experienced than me And there has never been an issue. What I try to do is support the team. I become part of the team. I serve."

The idea is that you should address it and not pretend that it doesn't exist and then blame ageism later on for the problem. What you have to do is deal with a lot of these problems proactively, rather than use the excuse of ageism to deal with the fact that you didn't adequately prepare, that you didn't walk in with confidence and self assurance and, lastly, Deal with an issue that you think an employer might be concerned about proactively.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.