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Why Do Some LinkedIn Profiles Use General Job Functions Where the Title Usually Goes? | JobSearchTV.com


Listen to the full episode here::
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2018/10/10/why-do-some-linkedin-profiles-use-general-job-functions-where-the-title-usually-goes-jobsearchradio-com/

Answer to yourself before watching my answer.

Summary

So I've got a fun question today. The question is, "why do some people on LinkedIn use general job functions where the title usually goes?"
It's a good question and I see that from time to time. There are a couple of possible reasons why people do it .Before I go into those, there are two areas where this can occur.
Number one is In the headline are The headline is where your name is. And then there's the line underneath it. So, underneath your name is one area where people often put their title. The other one is underneath their current and previous employers.
Both of areas where titles are pretty common. Now, in the in the case of the first one where we're dealing with, the. title, sometimes, isn't the best way to describe oneself. It's often best to think in terms of keywords and what the attraction would be in someone doing a search for you. So, if you think of LinkedIn and your individual profile as being something that needs to be search engine optimized like a website ,you want to have keywords there that will be attractive to firms looking for you.
So , inmy case, I might use the term recruiter .Headhunter. Terms along those lines because those describe what I do professionally and will be recognized by LinkedIn. (NOTE I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING)
Now, In either case, title sometimes are not quite descriptions. So, I sometimes see titles like "associate level 13. "What the hell does that mean? How is it different from an associate level 12 or 11 or 15? Instead of that, a pe?Rson might use a descriptor in that field in order to describe what it is that they do. So, that's one possible reason why someone might use terms that are search engine optimized or searchable or searched by people in order to be found in that spot It's not my ideal choice, but it's really a reason why.
Another reason why people do it is they made a mistake. They don't think their title is particularly relevant and it might be. So, sometimes people have mistaken notions of what should go in there, even though it's very clear. It says position so they duck the subject.
Maybe they're trying to indicate that they are not as high level or not as low level and they're trying to be described by function. But, when all is said and done, you know, when someone is being interviewed or spoken with my phone, they're going to be, "so what's your title," because it's a missing piece of information. Anything that's an omission or a conscious ommission becomes an area of Investigation by interviewers because they're curious.
Why did you choose to do that? Most people are relatively compliantand they do put in the position title. And why didn't you? That's the way I think. Anything that's out of the norm, I want to know more about . It doesn't make it bad, but it leaves me curious.
So far., I'm giving you the answers of. "they wanted use a search term and make that immediately visible." Sometimes it's a mistake that, most of the time, frankly,it is a mistake that job hunters make by putting it there because, frankly, you know at the end of the day, there's so much text particularly in the summary area where you can keyword stuff your profile to make it very attractive for search terms though.
Three main reasons I see .What do you think? Leave us a comment below. Let me know what your thoughts are.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join Career Angles on Facebook and receive support, ideas and advice in your current career and job.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

No BS Job Search Advice: Run Your Race! | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/08/17/no-bs-job-search-advice-run-your-race-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1199 What do I mean by, “run your race,” in the context of job hunting and your career?

Summary

When I think of job hunting, frankly, it is like walking into a casino for most of you and sitting there the tables. You don't really know the rules. Thus, you are easy pickings for the casino. Even if you do know the rules and how to play the game, most of the time, the casino is going to make money on you no matter what.

Understand that the way job is stacked right now, you're playing a game that is rigged against you. What can you do?

Obviously, you can refuse to comply, but eventually you'll be chewed up by the system. You can refuse to comply by refusing to apply for job through an applicant tracking system until you spoken to hiring manager. It's an easy way to do it on your room.

The real thing though is about attitude. You see, the Attitude that you have been instilled with is the one being the compliant employee. And fitting in. And doing what is demanded of you every step along the way to the point where you are a little cube you're being fitting amongst other cubes. In job hunting, Ideally from your vantage point, it is best to learn what the rules are and play your own game. Let me give you an example from sports.

Football teams. Basketball teams. Baseball teams There are lots of set plays That are involved. There are also lots of situations that they practice in order to put themselves in the position to put themselves in a position to execute the basic game plan, right? There is a lot of creativity and originality within those frameworks. You need to find the place for organizations respect you and your unique way of doing things.

If you want to be a drone, by all means… Do it. You can have messages piped into your head all day about being compliant doing what is demanded of you. Shut up. Do we tell you to do and don't have any original thoughts. Or, you can do things in your particular way and be sought out by firms. You see, LinkedIn is 1 of the greatest tools that we have in our modern times because it allows firms to reach out to you and for you to call more shots.

Remember, they are hunting for talent. If they want a person to fit into a box, that doesn't mean that you want to fit into a box, does it? I want to think in terms of a race. The race has a finish line – – the end of your career. How do you want to run the race? Do you know what could happen along the way? Do you know how to get you from where you are now and how to get to the finish line?

If you don't, you need to learn quickly. Let me give you an example. I was doing online coaching call I blab.im on the platform was still up. It is on YouTube as "No BS Coaching: Play Your Game Big!" At the end of the day, this person wants to move in the direction for their career a little bit differently than the obvious path. I spoke about informational interviews and you said, "Yeah, I have one scheduled." I asked him, "How about 5? How about 10? You can't just take one person's viewpoint for how to get to the finish line. And, even if the viewpoint is right, maybe it is right for you."

One thing I've learned over the course of the years in recruiting is that everything works in job search. It never works as well as we would like or as often as we would like but, at the end of the day, everything works. You may be turned down for a bunch of jobs but, eventually, you will find one that fits you. If it's your drive. It fits your ambition. If it's the kind of career goals that you have. Run the race in your particular way. Don't worry about what recruiters might tell you because a lot of them will tell you that you doing it all wrong. "It is a terrible mistake you're making! GROAN!"

Your job is to make a work recruiter a fee. YYour job is to make the corporate recruiter happy. Your job is to make yourself happy. Don't sell out your own ambitions for what the company wants.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

The LinkedIn Advice You Never Hear | Job Search Radio

FROM THE ARCHIVES
I was at a conference of recruiters in Denver a few weeks ago and met Traci Enos there. She has been a top 1% professional on LinkedIn and took a completely different view of it to get there than most people do. I scheduled her for Job Search Radio while we were there because I really thought she would tell you many things that would be incredibly helpful.

 

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

Getting on the Radar | Job Search Radio


Whether you are actively or passively looking for work, you need to do things to get on the radar of the differnt people who will be trying to hire talent. Jeff and David Perry, the head headhunter for Perry-Martel International and author or co-author of 5 books including, “Guerilla Marketing for Job Hunters” discuss the mistakes people make with their LinkedIn profiles, how to make them stronger and an example of someone who David helped find a divisional President’s position for with a firm many times larger than his current one at a compensation at least 3 times larger than what he was currently earning that all started with powering up his LinkedIn profile.

Summary

Hi, this is Jeff Altman and welcome to webtalkradio.net. When I think of Linkedin, I don’t just think of a social network for business. I tend to think of the most important vehicle that professionals/ nonprofessional labor has in order to find work. You see to me, the person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest. They don’t always work the hardest, although those are great qualities to have. I tend to think of the person who gets ahead as the one who remains alert to opportunity. Sometimes that’s internal to work in an organization, but more often it’s external. Today we’re going to talk to David Perry who’s the headhunter for Perry-Martel International.

He’s negotiated more than 200 million in salaries and completed more than a thousand recruiting projects on three continents. He has a bachelor’s from McGill and is the author or co-author of five books, including his most recent, gorilla hunting for job hunters 3.0. David, Welcome to Job Search Radio.

Good morning, Jeff. Thanks very much for having me. Pleased to be here.

You’re very welcome and I’m thrilled to have you on the show. You know, like I was saying. People need to be alert to opportunities and that translates to me as not just simply when they might need to find a job but just being open to other opportunities while they might still be happy in an organization. That requires being found, and Linkedin is probably the most important place to be found by recruiters, both corporate and third party. Yet people make a lot of mistakes working with Linkedin. I’m sure you see that all the time.

Every day.

What sort of things do you see that people do wrong with their Linkedin profiles and how they use Linkedin?

Oh, that’s a great question. Let me preface it by saying, no one should ever go into a job search before they do one thing. And the one thing they need to do is start with absolute clarity. When it comes to Linkedin, what I mean by that is, it is limitless what you can put into Linkedin. Really, the mere fact that you can change a tire on a car - does anybody really care? Maybe they do if you’re looking for a mechanic’s job.

So here’s the point. You’ve got all this information about yourself. If you start with clarity about the type of job you want to do or the type of organization you want to work for then you fill your profile with information that relates to that. So it makes you easy to be found by a recruiter using the keyword search for the types of opportunities that you’d be interested in.

You and I both know, all jobs are temporary now. Everyone’s gonna change every 18 to 24 months. It might be inside a company, but more than likely it’s going outside a company. So because all jobs are temporary, you need a billboard on the information highway and Linkedin is that.
So with that said, when you think about the mistakes people make, I’m gonna translate as being not getting clear about what you might be open to or what you might be looking for in your next organization and thus not making your profile keyword rich enough around those particular attributes that you want to draw people to. Would that be a correct summary?

Absolutely. Absolutely. I wish I’d said it that well myself.

And you provided a lot of texture. What other mistakes might people make when they construct their profiles?

Well even people that start with clarity and understand what they want to be found for, the first place people normally go wrong - and it’s so funny that people do this wrong - is a bad picture. And what I mean by a bad picture is, it’s a picture of you in a group of people. No one’s going to be able to pick you up because they don’t know who you are. Or it’s a picture of you standing somewhere so that on the screen, you’re about a quarter inch tall.

When you do a picture, you want it to be a professional photo. You want to have a nice smile on, you want to be engaging. People like people that smile. People like people that look engaging and interesting, not like a slob on a bad hair day. The reason this is important is that even though it’s technology, the person that’s looking at your Linkedin profile is the most important thing first: they’ve got to like you. And that’s a gut-level decision they make, like it or not, based on your appearance. So get a great photo, have a well-lit - you know, potentially have a photographer take it. But make sure it’s a well-lit photo, you’re smiling, you’re dressed professionally or you’re dressed in a manner that people can see you in that role.

If you’re a mechanic, you’re dressed like a mechanic. If you’re a CEO, wear the appropriate attire. That’s where most people go wrong, right out the gate. You want number two?

I just want to add onto that one and simply say that the tuxedo shop for guys and the ballroom dress for women isn’t the direction I would go.

You know what? I forget that, and you’re absolutely correct. That’s not natural. That’s not you at work. You’re so absolutely right because I’ve seen a couple of those lately and it did make me laugh.

So what’s number two? What’s the second mistake that you tend to pick up on?
Number two is, you’re boring. And what I mean by boring is you’re dull. Right out of the gate. For example, you and I do a lot of project-manager sales guys. So as a recruiter when I do a keyword search in Linkedin, I get a whole list of people that match that keyword profile and what I’ll see is name and next to that will be their tagline which is their tagline, which is the piece of text that is right next to your photo. And the thing
That’s that big definition of real estate underneath your name that kind of describes who you are, right?

Absolutely. So what will a project manager put? He’ll put ‘project manager’. That’s very good, except so did every other project manager. So how do you differentiate yourself?

I’m looking for a project manager in New York and I do a search, I’m going to get like four or five thousand results and for a recruiter, how can he tell if you’re any better than anybody else because it’s just a list that says name, project manager; name, project manager all the way down the list.

Well if you take your tagline, which is that part just after your name as you said, and you put something compelling like a question: you know, ‘ask me how I saved my employer $100,000’ or ‘ask me how I finished a project in one third of the time’. Those kinds of questions are compelling because they actually look at the results that someone would be looking for someone to produce if they were a project manager. And if you put that into your title or your tagline, all of a sudden of all the other project managers, yours says ‘ask me how I did boom.’ And you stick out like a sore thumb or in this case, you stick out like a four-leaf clover.

That kind of reminds me of an interview that I did for a previous show with a gentleman named Hal Klegman who told me that the biggest mistake people make with their resumés is that they say a lot about job descriptions instead of accomplishments, and defining accomplishments by metrics like ‘earned such and such,’ ‘saved such and such’, ‘increased or decreased’ as a way of defining the success that you had in the organization, not just simply talking about role and responsibilities.

Correct. And every recruiter knows what a project manager does. You don’t have to tell us what you responsibilities and duties were. Because that’s just saying ‘hey, you’re an idiot. You don’t know what I do.’ Tell us what you accomplished. It’s like your resumé. You know, you go for an interview as a project and nobody has ever asked you, ‘So, what were your duties and responsibilities as a project manager’. It doesn’t happen.

They’re interested in what you did for that employer to push the cause forward. We both know, employers are all interested in only three things: can you make me money, can you save me money, can you increase my efficiency. That’s it. Until they actually get to know you and meet you, they don’t care about anything else. So you have to deliver the WIIFM: what’s in it for me. For employers, it’s ‘what’s in it for you’. So tell them what’s in it for them in the summary of your Linkedin profile by using the accomplishments that you know they’re going to be interested in because they’re relevant to the job you’re looking for .

That’s great, David. I want to cover one or two more mistakes that people make with their profiles if you have that, and then talk about a profile that we discussed last week where you helped this CEO really beef up his search and get great results. Let me just pause and come back to mistakes. What else do you see that people don’t do correctly?

Well, they don’t take advantage of all of the different types of file formats that you can use inside Linkedin. For example, when we were kids and I’m 53 so I’ve been doing it since kindergarden, right? The most interesting part of my day for me and everybody else in the class was show and tell. Right? So show and tell. You can use rich media. It’s called rich media. You can add photos and videos and weblinks in your Linkedin profile. And very few people do that. It’s a bland, boring job description of what they’re responsible for.

Throw that out. Use accomplishments and add some photos, if you’ve got them, that are relevant. Photos of a project that you did photos of a product you worked on, whatever.

Videos: same sort of thing. If you’re a writer, you can add a white paper. All of these things add depth and texture to who you are as an individual. All Linkedin really is is a first interview. And recruiters will go and look at a Linkedin profile well before they’ll call them in for a first interview. So if you consider Linkedin your first interview, what is it that you would like an interviewer to know about you that would make them want to meet you and find out more.

So if you look at Linkedin as the movie trailer for your life and career, one of the most interesting themes from your career that you could put into your movie trailer, if you looked at your Linkedin profile that way: think about that. What would be most interesting for your employer and go and get that kind of material and weave it into your profile.

When I think of that, David, I think of the summary area as a beautiful spot on the Linkedin profile to really demonstrate that. I know recently, I made some changes to my profile in order to bring in more video there, to be clear about the kind of searches I’ve done, where they’ve been geographically, to give people a way to contact me and a few more things that really distinguish me from the typical search professional that they might find me on Linkedin and it’s right there. It’s the first field but I know few people really take advantage of all that Linkedin provides them with in order to really promote themselves effectively for a reader.

Correct. I actually noted that and now I’m going to go compare my profile to your profile and pick up some pointers. There’s a great example. Why do people insist on inventing things from scratch? And what I mean by that is a lot of people get stuck on their Linkedin profile because they just don’t know what to say. They don’t know what’s interesting. Instead of getting stuck, why don’t they take the title of the position they’re looking for, put it into Linkedin search box, and see who comes up first. Ooo! Why do they come first? Because they have designed their profile to come up first. Just like a google search. You know, 50 pizza outlets well one of them’s going to come up first because they’ve done their search engine optimization correctly. And that sounds like it’s hard but it’s not. So when people get stuck, what they really need to do is go and take a look at other people’s profiles and see how they’ve constructed them and construct them in a similar manner.

One of the things that people can realize in addition to that is that there are signals that you get along the way, if you pay attention to them, that your profile just isn’t working for you. That is the notice that Linkedin sends to you about the numbers of people and who has looked at your profile. If you’re getting one or two hits a week or a month, there’s something wrong with your profile and you got to fix it.

And to add to that, Jeff, if you’re getting people looking at your profile that have nothing to do with the industry that you’re trying to target, then you’ve done something wrong and you’ve got to step back and analyze that. The easiest way to do that is to throw the title of job you’re looking for in and see what the other person’s doing.
And I’m going to pile on and say if you’ve got lots of people looking at your profile and no one contacting you, there’s a message in that too.

You know what? I should have thought of that. You’re absolutely right again. That’s a bigger problem because you’re saying something that’s turning people off or you’re not saying something that’s making them want to follow through or you’re making their life impossible, and what I mean is somebody sets up their Linkedin profile and they make it impossible for you to contact them. You either have to be a first Linkedin contact or you have to go through the whole rigmarole to contact them this way or this way. If you’re looking for a job, you want someone to find you’ great. That’s a great first step.

Next, you’ve got to get them to contact you. So I always tell people put your name, your phone number, and it can be a phone that you just rent for job search if you want to. You put your name, phone number, and email address that you want to be connected at the top end of your profile, in your summary so it makes it easy. Not that recruiters are lazy, but when you do a search for project managers in New York you’re going to get, I don’t know, 750,000, and you want to be the one that will get called. And you know that most recruiters go through and take the easy road, and by the easy road I mean, ‘oh, you look qualified and you have a phone number. I’m going to call them first. You gotta get the call.

You mentioned having the job search phone number. One of the tools I love is google voice. Voice.google.com I believe is the address or google.com/voice, and google will provide you with a phone nubmer that you can direct to connect with any other phone number that you have. So if you don’t want to be contacted after the search is over, which personally I think is a mistake but that’s a different conversation, you still have one phone number instead of having them contact you at you home, contact you at the office, call you on the mobile while you’re commuting. One number that will track you to wherever you are that will also forward a text to you if you like, that will translate any voicemail message that’s left for you. It’s a great little tool. Free, by the way.

Yeah, isn’t it great?

I love it. I happen to use it myself. When we spoke previously, you told me about this corporate or divisional CEO, as I recall, who just wasn’t getting responses with his Linkedin profile and you mentioned that you had really helped this person improve their game on Linkedin pretty dramatically and increase his number of connections by several thousand over a short period of time. Could you talk about some of the techniques that you used to really increase their capabilities around Linkedin?

Absolutely, and it was pretty simple. It was a guy that I met that I got to know fairly well. He became a friend. And he decided for whatever reason he wanted to be more engaged with Linkedin because he wanted to look at other things. So he sat down one night over the dinner table at my house and looked at his profile which frankly sucked.

He was a vice president of construction for somebody, so his tagline was ‘vice president of construction.’ I said, how many vice presidents of construction do you think there are in your town and I said you know, you don’t stand out. So what we did was we recrafted his tagline. That was the first thing we did. And we recrafted his tagline from ‘vice president of construction’ to ‘vice president, commercial development. Ask me how I turned a swamp into a billion dollars’.

What a great attention-getter.

Oh, yeah. He had twelve connections. So I should him how to try and connect with people but we started with the title, ‘ask me how I turned a swamp into a billion dollars’ and then we went down and we wrote a profile. And let me read you the opening paragraph. ‘To remain a bullet-proof market leader in an intense, competitive, and highly volatile global market, companies need optimized transformation at their root level across all areas of the company. It’s a zero game. Be bullet-proof or be eliminated.’

Some people will look at that and they’ll go, ‘what are you talking about.’ And you know, that’s good because they don’t need to talk to him. He doesn’t need to talk to them. And the people who read that and go ‘wow’, and a lot of people did, are senior executives in the real estate industry all over the world.

Within a week he was up to 500 connections. And these are connections where he took a very narrow focus. He read every single connect to request with him and he only accepted it if they were senior executives or a head hunter in his particular space. He was at 3,000 by the end of the month. He had a very high quality, very targeted Linkedin face. And he took it from there. He didn’t talk about what his duties were, he talked about what he’d done. And he’d done things all over the world.

He ended up with interesting offers from India, Spain, many of them here in the United States. One in Mexico, one in Brazil. All for senior executives either in construction or in real estate and he’s accepted a job a couple weeks ago, and he’s accepted the president of the western division of a 25 billion dollar real estate conglomerate. And the most interesting thing: he’s currently VP construction of a - call it 50 million dollar company. But he’s built companies from the ground up, the one that’s largest is 250 million. And now, he’s going to be this president of a western division of a 25 billion dollar real estate company.

Here’s a wonderful lesson for our listeners, I think, to ensure a lot of intent to deal with the little picture in their Linkedin profile: the details of role responsibilities, accomplishments, if they’re an IT it might include the technologies that they’ve used and that’s all fine, well and good. But your person dealt at a bigger level. I’m sure they included some of that stuff in their profile to ensure that they keywords came up for them when people were searching and thus, the kind of message that they communicated really stood out by comparison to others. You also have to include the big picture of what your accomplishments were in order to really stand out from all the others that you’re competing with.

Correct. Couldn’t have said it better myself. And he didn’t do keyword stuffing, which nobody wants to do, but he made sure that the types of things that CEOs or recruiters that were looking for at his level would be seen in his profile. Like he used ROI, an abbreviation, or ‘return on investment’. Very few people, even executives, ever talk about return on investment. This guy did. He talks about C-level management suite. A recruiter is going to type in ‘C-level executive’. So all of the keywords that a recruiter or an executive search professional or a CEO or the owners of a real estate or a construction company would likely use, and we had to give this some real thought - we need a list of all this - were naturally woven into the profile.

Now here’s what’s interesting. A lot of people will go to the trouble of putting together all of the keywords they think someone’s going to search on, and then they’ll just make a bulleted list and put it in their summary. And that’s clever. But really, it doesn’t tell anyone anything about you or your abilities, other than that you’re pretty clever or somebody did this keyword stuffing for you. To actually take the keywords that you want to be found for and craft sentences and entire paragraphs around that to give it some depth is well worth it, but difficult.

When I was talking to him last week, his base salary, just the base, which is well into six figures, has been tripled. And his upside has gone from low six figures to low seven figures. So it might have gone up from $175,000 to a base of $450,000 now and an upside of just slightly over a million within the first 18 to 24 months. That’s a substantial change.

This doesn’t just happen at the executive level. This happens at every single level. I’ve done this with my daughters who are on Linkedin. They’re 21, 20, and 18. Instead of getting your regular ten dollar an hour job while they’re off in university, they’re getting $15 - $20 dollars an hour because they are able to articulate their value correctly to their employer to had a solution that these guys could solve.

At the end of the day, you and I both know, nobody gets up on Monday morning and says, ‘oh, I’m going to hire someone today because I have extra money.’ No, they get up on Monday and say, ‘Ugh, it’s Monday and I’ve still got this problem and this problem and this problem. They’re looking for people to be solution providers. And if you come across that way and build it into your Linkedin profile that way, you’ll get phone calls. And by the way, he made it very easy to connect with him.

Beautiful story. And for our listeners, I just want to remind all of you that these are strategies that work whether you are aggressively looking for a job today or are passively open to something in the future which you really need to do. As David said so well, jobs unfortunately in the modern era are temporary, whether they call them permanent or not. These are the least permanent things I’ve ever seen. So you need to put yourself into the position to be found in order to have opportunities present themselves to you. It doesn’t mean you need to respond favorably to everything. But the easiest way to find a job is when you’re not looking for one. Opportunity just gets presented to you that you can go Eenie,Meenie, Miney, Mo. Hey, that one looks pretty good. Let’s go into that one. I know there’s one mistake that job hunters make all the time.

What do you think is one of the biggest mistakes that people make on Linkedin profiles?

The biggest one that I find people make with Linkedin on general is, they never log back on. They get a profile, they put up something.

You’re absolutely right.

I see it all the time. They change jobs and never update their email address. They never provide people a way to reach them once they’re on Linkedin. And it’s bizarre to me.

Some people never send Christmas cards until they’ve lost their jobs and they realize they need to network. As Harvey MacKay said, ‘you need to dig your well before you’re thirsty’. It has to be part of your life. And Linkedin has to be part of your life, even if you only log in once a week or once every two weeks just to make sure things are refreshed and you remember to put your email address and your phone number in your summary. It’s a whole lot easier for recruiters to get a hold of you.

And with recruiters, you have two choices. You can say yes, or you can say no. How much easier can it get? I gotta tell you. It’s a lot easier than trying to get people on the other end of the phone pick up than when you’re looking. So it’s a great show today because you’re adding tremendous value to people’s lives and I hope they take it all very seriously.
And David, thank you so much for making time to be here and talk to our guests. I know you mentioned to me that you have an audio that you’d like to offer to everyone. How can they get a copy of that audio, and what is that audio of?

The audio is a 45-minute presentation with another fellow author being interviewed by another fellow offer on branding and social media. And we go step by step on a whole bunch of points, including the Starbucks coffee cup caper and gorilla resumé and listeners can get that by going to the guerilla marketing for job hunters website, which is simply gm4jh.com. It’s free. No strings attached.

That’s terrific. Thank you for making that available to everyone.

My pleasure.

Folks, we’re going to be back next time with more job search advice. I’m Jeff Altman, the big game hunter. If you’re interested in job search coaching from me, you can reach out to me in a variety of ways. One is, I’m a Live Person job search and career coach expert with liveperson.com. You can reach me that way if you have a couple of questions. If you’d like more broad coaching from me through the course of a job search, you can find out more about my coaching program at www.TheBigGameHunter.us

Again, I work one on one in a personal with you in an effort to help you get back to work more quickly because to me, job hunting doesn’t have to be so hard or difficult or painful or take so long. It’s just for most people, you don’t realize that the skills needed to find a job are different from the skills needed to do a job. And that’s where a podcast or my ezine, which by the way you can get a complimentary subscription to my ezine, which is called ‘no bs job search advice’. I publish it weekly with advice for job hunters anywhere in the world. It’s a $499 value that I give away for free and by the way, you can get a complimentary subscription to my website, which is jeffaltman.com. And while there, go exploring. There’s a lot of great content there. So this is Jeff Altman. Hope you found today’s show helpful. I’ll be back next time with more great advice for you. Take care.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

 

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

 

JobSearchTV.com

What LinkedIn Summary Should I Have to Attract Recruiters | JobSearchTV.com


Recruiters are constantly scouring LinkedIn for candidates. What LinkedIn summary should you have to attract recruiters?

Summary

"What LinkedIn summary should I have to attract recruiters?" As is the case of most of these questions, the sender hasn't put themselves in the position of being a recruiter. I don't do that kind of work anymore but I did for more than 40; I have a good perspective on it.

The 1st part of the question is, "how to attract recruiters." From there, once you understand the recruiters are finding people on LinkedIn, it becomes clearer.

When someone is looking on LinkedIn to find someone to fill a job with the client, they do keywords in order to do a search. Thus, whether is your profile or specifically the summary area of your profile, it needs to be keyword rich in order to demonstrate a fit.

Now, I would think more in terms of your profile and then, from there, use the summary is a summary of what you will attributes are.

When I think of who might be writing this question, I think they might be a less experienced person. Thus, what you want to be doing is writing about what your background really is. That's because when you write your profile you want to write one That is all inclusive… A laundry list of stuff. You want to make your summary as concise as possible (I'm not talking about brevity, per se), but you want to create incident someone looking at your profile clearly understands what your strengths are. After all, you don't want to do pointless interviews, do you? Zero it in and let the rest of the profile be keyword rich in order to draw people to the page.

From there, what I always tell people to do, is put a phone number and email address in your summary. Why? Because LinkedIn charges about $11 per inMail to message you and you are not on LinkedIn all the time To respond to inMails and messages that you receive. The fastest way for recruiter to contact you is not by spending $11 or $12 waiting for you to go online, But, instead, calling you or emailing you.Putting this information in your summary makes it easier for them to contact you… That expedites it for them by making it easier for you them to contact you…That is what you said you wanted when you wrote, right? It isn't enough to just get the view page. You want to get them to contact you.

In addition, if you have a premium account of some sort,Just checking to see who looked at your profile and who hasn't contacted you. From there, what you do is reach out to them, Message them and simply say, "LinkedIn told me that you would look at my profile. Let's connect. Is there anything I can be doing to help you? Is there something you are looking for in my background that you didn't see which I can address in the conversation?" What this does is flush them out so that you have an opportunity to connect with them.

Again, use the profile for a lot of keywords and the summary area to summarize what a lot of your attributes are. If you are a more senior individual. This becomes even more important.

So, zero in In the summary, give them an easy way to contact with you And you will get more results.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Second Most Important Place on Your LinkedIn Profile | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the second most important place for you to write about in your Linked in profile.

Summary

I'm going to speak about the second most important area on your LinkedIn profile. Just to get it out of the way, the most important area is the line underneath your name. Between your name and outline, you are guiding people to what it is that you do. It needs to be quick and punchy to draw attention for people so that they are interested in going further.

The second most important area, the one that gets sorely neglected is your summary. Too often, I see summaries that are four or five lines long. Why can't you say more about yourself and create a section that is keyword rich that talks about your role and responsibilities and achievements in a generic sense, and then going to more specifics in the rest of your profile.

You can say, for So and So, I did such and such, reducing costs by X number of dollars or increasing sales by Y number of dollars.

Don't sell it short. Don't neglect it because it is the first place that a person's eyes go to after they've seen your name and the line underneath your name.

Sequencing it, it is your name, the line underneath your name, your summary, who you work for now, and then people's eyes bounce up to the summary again if it is good.

If it isn't good, it's a waste of time. People will go right to what you are doing now. You've missed an opportunity to persuade them.

A summary gives you a selling opportunity that you should neglect. If you use it well, you have an opportunity to really shine to a reader.

If you like, I have a few punchy comments in mind including my number in LinkedIn (I'm number 7653), as well as how I score on Myers-Briggs, DISC and Core MAP.

I talk about how I filled more than 1000 positions.

It's stuff like that that gets a reader's attention.

After all, is a certain amount that's pretty standard if you do recruiting. How radically different is that? Enhancements around that are what really make me stand out. Then when people go further and they see the YouTube videos I've done, the books I've written the podcasts I host and all the other things I do, I really shine.

Look for opportunities for yourself to stand out from the pack by using the second most important section of your LinkedIn profile and the one that is probably most neglected.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to [email protected]  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Hangout With Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter: Overcoming Your Small LinkedIn Network


A simulcast of No B. S. Job Search Advice Radio on BlogTalkRadio.com

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

The New LinkedIn Profile (VIDEO)


LinkedIn has changed its profile page. How should you change yours?

Summary

I thought I would do a video today about the new LinkedIn profile because it is a little bit different and it requires you to think a little bit differently about the visuals on the page.

When you look at the new profile now your initial reaction may be that looks pretty similar to the old one. However, notice how the summary area is now part of the opening box. Notice how the screen is initially somewhat limited as to what you are able to see. What it tells me is (1) , your headline has to be particularly good. It's going to include the name of your current company, plus the University that you attended. It doesn't tell anyone about your degree, but it just displays your most recent university, where you're located and how many network connections you have. LinkedIn always limits the number that they display in terms of the number of connections. I am someone with 17,000+1st level connections and they say 500+.

Here is one change so I thought was interesting. The summary is that is displayed is initially limited to 2 lines. There was the drop down to see more and what you would come to expect in the summary area from LinkedIn now appears that you now have to click the drop-down. It's now saying that the 1st 2 lines of your summary are most important.

There's another thing that's a little bit different. It has access to your most recent media posts in one way or another, who has viewed your profile and the number of your shares, articles that you've written and then and there is something that is not obvious-- on the most recent experience, it is they are in full. Previous jobs require that you use the drop down for anyone to see what is there. Your. Most recent job is what is being emphasized. Then, there were the number of people who have endorsed you and what I saw initially (and it is not apparent right now), the profile now really emphasizes the 1st 3. I've open this up, but I saw before that the 1st 3 items are the highlighted areas. I'm going to make a few shifts you to move up a few things because I have a number of them that are more relevant as result of changing my career to coaching.

Then, LinkedIn displays a few of your recommendations, accomplishments, but notice that it is limited now. Only a few are listed on everything else is a drop-down. I just to use organizations for networking group I belong to… That is the one that is there. One certification. There the rest of my books. Drop downs are much more prevalent on the page in the new LinkedIn profile. There are a few the groups I am a member of listed.

What it is telling me is (1) your most recent job is most important. (2) if you look off to the side. They want me to change my photo. They seem as though they're going to ask for updates from time to time.

The biggest change seems to be how they are displaying the summary where they are showing the 1st 2 lines of it instead of the whole thing unless you use the drop down, I want you to think in terms of what the 1st want to lines of your summary say and how you can presented most effectively on the profile. Perhaps the 1st 2 lines of your summary are keyword rich in order to emphasize the fact that that is something that people are visually seeing.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at [email protected] and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchTV.com

Why Am I Not Getting Emails from Recruiters? | JobSearchTV.com


I am a gainfully employed data scientist with a solid career history and I have a good network in the data science community online. I am active on Twitter and have a LinkedIn profile. However, I have never received an email or message from a recruiter. What can I do to start getting recruited?

I think my answer is valid for any profession.

Summary

There's a great question.

"Why am I not getting recruiter emails?" A lot of people complain that they get too many. This person isn't getting any and all. They go on to explain, "I am a gainfully employed data scientist with a good job history and a good network in the data science community online. I'm active on Twitter and have a LinkedIn profile. However, I have never received an email or message from a recruiter. What can I do to start getting recruited?"

I think this problem is true for a lot of people that want to start by saying we don't know how experienced this person is. Let's assume that this person has 2 to 5 years of experience. They haven't indicated that their managers so we will just assume that they are a staff level individual.

Maybe this is their 1st job, and their resume in recruiter databases is not particularly provocative or interesting. Keywords in the resume for this individual are not turning up. Maybe they were a recent graduate when they last started looking for a job. As a result, unit may not be showing up in the databases when they run a search.

Next, he says that he is on LinkedIn and the next question is why are they contacting him through LinkedIn? There are a few possible reasons.
1. Your profile is not particularly good. It is not particularly keyword rich (think of longtail keywords). What are some of the words that someone might be using to look for someone like you? Do they appear on your profile?
2. Do you make it easy for them to contact you? Include your email address and phone number in the summary area of your profile.
3. You don't want to say you are looking for position but before you update your resume but before you had your email address and phone number to your profile, you want to go to your privacy settings and temporarily turn them off so that all your connections are not notified that you have made this change. Make sure you turn it back on afterwards.
4. Another reason you may not be being contacted by recruiters is that your privacy settings are set up in such a way that your profile is hidden on LinkedIn. There is now a new feature on LinkedIn that allows you to signal recruiters that you are open to something else. Make sure that function is activated. I can't tell you where to look for it other than to say look at privacy settings or do a Google search or a YouTube search to find out how to do this.
5. The next thing I would do is to tell you to join work groups on LinkedIn that deal with data science.. There are always recruiters in groups who are there to find people to contact about jobs and you have made it easier for them.

Again, it starts by making sure that your LinkedIn profile is keyword rich so that when people are searching for someone like you. They understand what it is you can do and can find you. Also, make sure that your privacy settings are set up in such a way that people can reach out to you once they do find you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Do I Need to Worry About My Contacts Being Hassled If I Connect With a Recruiter?

Do I Need to Worry About My Contacts Being Hassled If I Connect With a Recruiter? (VIDEO)


I’m concerned that my contacts will be harassed by recruiters if I accept a connection request from a recruiter.

 

Summary

This is a job search question that someone asked me that I thought would be a good one to answer. Most people tend to think of answering this in the "old way." The old way is it relevant anymore.

The old way is, "Do I need to worry about my contacts being hassled or harassed. If I accept the connection request from a recruiter?"

In the old way of thinking of things, if you accept the connection request from a recruiter, you would be inundated with connection requests that asked, "Would you introduce me to so-and-so. I would like to speak with them about a job." Maybe, you would be asked, "Do you think they would be interested in land in the Poconos?" All sorts of nonsense.

It isn't that way anymore because recruiters, salespeople, business executives don't need introductions to get contact information from LinkedIn. Putting aside the premium accounts for 2nd, there are Google chrome extensions that, as long as you are on a page for someone will reveal, generally very accurately, the email address for person and sometimes the phone number. Thus, if they want to reach out to someone, they can reach out by email to them as long as they are a 1st, 2nd, 3rd level connection with them or in a group with them.

For someone like me with 17,000+1st level connections, I can reach a hell of a lot of people in the US with that in a hell will want in a lot of other countries, too, because those chrome extensions are really quite good. In addition, for those of you who don't want to go through LinkedIn, there are Google custom search engines like www.LI-USA.info that searches all the LinkedIn public profiles in the United States. Once you have the profile up on your screen, you can use the chrome extension to get an email address. Thus, there's really no reason to worry about it.

What are the chrome extensions? My favorite one is candidate.ai (NOTE: They may be shutting down the extension shortly). Then, there is Prophet

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is an executive job search and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

NOW WITH A 7 DAY FREE TRIAL!

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”