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The Three Jokes of Recruiting |No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter uses the three jokes of recruiting in order to teach an important lesson about job hunting.

honeypot2

 

spp-transcript]

I want to talk with you about the 3 jokes of the recruiting business.

The 1st joke is, “How can you tell a job applicant is lying to you?”  The answer is, “Their lips are moving.

What’s the 2nd joke?

How can you tell a client is lying to you?

Their lips are moving.”

The 3rd joke is, “How can you tell he recruiter was lying to you?”  You guessed it – – their lips are moving.

 

When you basically translate it, what is being said is that everyone is posturing for advantage and the best outcome.  Everyone is exaggerating to some degree.

For you as a job hunter. You have to remember that the company may be talking with you about this great opportunity for you to advance when in most cases, what they really want to do is is hire the 4th drone in the 3rd cubicle on the 5th floor of a particular building.  You are not particularly important to them.

You may be important to that particular manager, but that manager, when times get tough, may not be they are any longer than you are.

In terms of the recruiter, the recruiter is posturing to engender trust in you. That’s because if you are unsure you may trust their words and allow yourself to take a job.

Now, if we were talking about an investment advisor and they were saying, “Trust me. Give me $50,000. Yeah. That’s the ticket yeah, trust me with the money.” You would be very hesitant. With the recruiter, you need to take your time before giving away your trust.

Finally, I understand that you are trying to get the best of the deal possible and you are trying to position yourself well. Everyone is kind of like 8-year-olds who are visiting their friends’ parents. Invariably, the 8-year-old is on good behavior over there, right? Well, everyone is on good behavior as part of the search process.

Your goal is to get the best information that you can in order to make a good decision for yourself. It’s not to be a good boy. It’s not to be a good girl. It’s to get the best information possible so that you can make a great choice, so that your career advances and you can get to where you want.

 

[/spp-transcript]

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Turn It Up! | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter shares some of his observations about working with recruiters and applies it to job hunting.

Serious mature businessman on call in front of laptop at desk in a bright office

Summary

In my career, I’ve trained a lot of very successful recruiters. I’ve also trained some people who have washed out.  I put my best effort to try to help these people. But, when push comes to shove, ultimately, the onus falls on them to follow through a lot of the coaching that I give. Often, the biggest failure is around effort.

Most people (including job hunters in this) say they want to do a hard days work and they want to put in. Best effort. They want to be successful BUT when you examine what they do, they are not working as hard as they think they are.  That is true of job hunters, too.

How People Find Jobs

For you as a job hunter, statistically, people are finding work in a number of ways.  Consistently, statistics show, the job boards fill between 3% and 4% of all positions.  Recruiters fill an additional 20% to 22%.  I’m going to combine the numbers because some recruiters use job boards to find candidates.  And I will add a little more than that.  So, let’s assume that 30% are filled by job boards and by recruiters.  

70%, though, is filled as a result of networking.  In a recent statistic that I heard, 70% that of those jobs (70% of the 70%) or filled as a result of a network connection to someone that they didn’t know at the beginning of the job search.

Here’s the point.  You are not working as hard as you can to find people to connect with and develop a relationship with in order to become 1 of those people in the 70%.  What you need to be doing is putting in a “Max effort.”  You need to try that much harder, to operate at a much higher capacity than you are now.  I’m not saying to work like a maniac.  You need to have some fun and there, too.  At the end of the day, you need to kick it up some notches. You need to put yourself out there with some people you are not really talking to yet.  You need to track these relationships so that, in this way, you remember your conversations, what your commitments are and follow-up… Stuff flows along those lines… When push comes to shove, you have to kick it up. Some notches.

Again, it’s not who applies to the most jobs on the job board.  You are swimming in the lake with a lot of hooks out when you’re swimming in job boards.  There is a lot of competition with other fish in their for that hook.  You want to be out there swimming in streams and rivers that have hooks out there, but not a lot of fish there. This way, you are able to swim up and be able to connect with the organization.  In addition, you need to be able to come in with a referral from someone you know.

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Marketing Yourself Like a Headhunter | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks with you about marketing yourself just like headhunters market themselves.

marketing-yourself

Summary

Let's talk today about what headhunters do in their work.

Answer.  They are doing business development work to identify potential clients that want to hire. [/spp-transcript]

How are they doing that?

There are a variety of different ways but the primary way is called:.  They are networking.  You're trying to find people who will give them a name, phone number and/or email address of someone to reach out to who is hiring.

More often than not they are doing what is called telemarketing.  They are on the phone, presenting themselves as human beings who have skills and capabilities that can help an organization fill positions.

Telemarketing works.  It is still the most effective way that salespeople sell.  They may get leads in a variety of different ways but being on the phone, causes them to do the sale.

You need to be doing the same thing.

How do you get those leads?  There are a variety of different ways.  You know about LinkedIn. Have you considered data.com? Spoke.com?  How about zoominfo.com?

These are all sites that provide you with names and the position of potential hiring managers.  In this way, if you are going to submit your resume to affirm, you can use a backdoor way to reach out to someone and present yourself as a human being, different than just a resume submitted to an applicant tracking system.  Different than just a resume that submitted or referred by someone.

They can hear you on the phone, even if you are just leaving a voicemail.  It's an opportunity to present a case for yourself.

Again, I just want to encourage you.  Get on the phone.  Don't just simply rely on applicant tracking systems, emails or even introductions.  Reach out to people so that they know something about you.  They get a sense of your enthusiasm, passion and excitement for what you do, just from the tone of your voice.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

What You Must Do If a Recruiter Calls or Emails – No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what you must do if a recruiter calls you or emails you after you submit a resume.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you today about an experience I’ve had recently that I think is absolutely ridiculous. You, as a job hunter, cannot do this.

You send a resume to a recruiter after seeing a job that they had online.  You receive an email or phone call from the recruiter and what don’t you do?

Respond to them.

It’s ridiculous!

I’m not saying you shall respond instantaneously, but, you saw a job! I’m staring at a bunch of messages that I left 2 days ago.  I haven’t gotten over for return phone call from these people.  If I sent them an email.  I haven’t received a response.

A phone call.  Very simple.  A conversation.  5 minutes.  Responding to an email to answer a few questions so I can discern whether you fit.  5 minutes.  Very easy to do.

No response?  Come on!

You are in job hunting mode and don’t respond to people when there’s a position available? Help me understand how this makes sense to you.

I’m not going to encourage you.  I’m going to demand, Once you send out a resume, you have a commitment to respond when someone leaves a message for you.  After all, they’ve invested effort in responding to you.  It is rude not to respond back.

You may say the reverse is also true.  Recruiters don’t call me back.  Well, if you sent out spam to them (a resume that in no way, shape or form was close to fitting the job that you are submitting it for) why do you expect the call back?  After all, all you are doing is wasting their time.

However, if you said that a resume for job that you appear to fit AND you have gotten a call from 1 of them, or an email seeking clarification of some points, you have a fish on the hook! Reel it in!

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Should I Tell The Recruiter I Have Counteroffer?


You’ve been looking for a job for a while, received and accepted an offer from a firm, given notice and received a counteroffer. Should you tell the recruiter?

Summary

Should I tell a recruiter I have a counteroffer? I want to start off with a few questions.

In telling the recruiter you have a counteroffer, what are you trying to accomplish? If you want to stay where you are, if your current employer has resolved every single reason why you decided to leave (after all, it wasn't only about earning more money; it wasn't just about getting a better job; it may have involved coworkers. It may have involved promotional opportunities), stay. What are you hoping to gain by telling the recruiter?

If the counteroffer is one where your current employer says, "We'll match the offer," that takes care of the money part of the situation. What about the rest of it?

By the way, there are two different types of recruiters. Agency recruiters and corporate recruiters. Our bill with both a little bit later. Right now, I'm talking about you and your side of this.

So, again, if they match the money, so what? There still all these other things that are problematic. I talk to people all the time you stay when the money is matched and then call me a month later and asked if I can get the previous offer back.

NO! You burned a bridge. You said yes and now you said no. They have long memories.

What you do instead is ask yourself why you would want to state an organization that's holding you back that will keep you at the same desk for a higher paycheck. If the that's the reason you are leaving, you put a gun to their head, they will remember that when review time comes along or the next time that there's a promotion and they have a choice between you and the person that was loyal. They will reward the loyal one, obviously.

Unfortunately, people are seduced by the money and start jumping for it, begging for more and forget that there were other factors important, too.

Why would you stay with an organization we had to put a gun to their head, force them to make promises that they may forget later on in order to keep you.They may change nothing once you turn down the other offer.

The second thing I want to speak to is the difference between corporate recruiter and agency recruiter in this scenario.

Agency recruiter may pull out this article called, "Counteroffers: The Road to Ruin." This is an article written many years ago in a publication for recruiters. It tries to persuade job hunters that staying in a current job instead of joining the firm they promise to join will kill your career because employers have long memories and remember the disloyalty. After all, all they've done is give you your next raise a little early, nothing changes, etc.. They will beat you up relentlessly.

You have to calmly deflect that and tell them, "Go to the client. Tell them to up the money. I'll do it for this. It has to be a little bit above. After all, how do I gain if it it's the same money?"

With a corporate recruiter, will generally seem a little more care. Agency recruiters are afraid of losing their fee, the big payday for all the work that they've done. A corporate recruiter will ask, "Why do you want to stay? What is it about your old job that's changed the makes it better than ours?"

"Well, they match the money."

"What about all those other things that they haven't improved upon??"

You may eventually get to, "Well, I need a little bit more," but when push comes to shove they will either be able to do it or not be able to do it and you will have to make a decision.

I'll end by saying if it is only the money, remember that you put a gun to their head to get it. If they change other conditions, then maybe it's worth considering. Caveat emptor. Yes, tell other recruiters but have a reasonable expectation of what you can get from it. Just know that statistically, when I've seen people stay, problems arise later on.

When you go to a new place, you start fresh with a halo around you, in some respects it's easier and in some respects it's harder.  They view you as their Savior, a solution for them a solution for them, rather than someone aggravation on a Friday afternoon by giving notice.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Should I Email a Recruiter Who Missed an Interview With Me?


I am not sure if I should call them or let it slide and wait for them to call.

 

Summary

SUMMARY

The question for today you should I email the recruiter who missed the call with me today?

Let me turn the question around; if you missed the call with them, do you think they would’ve called you?

Hell yeah! They would’ve called you and probably put you on the defensive. And you can’t do that. You have to be bigger than that. A corporate recruiter might do it and expect to get an advantage from you later on.

With recruiters, you have to take it on the chin a little bit and say something like, “we were scheduled to speak at 230.”

To me, I would give them 10 minutes of grace time before calling them; I wouldn’t delay major lengths of time.

Why?

Because of is only 10 minutes, you probably have enough time to do the entire interview they would have done and not have to reschedule it.

They may feel inhibited or defensive if they get an email from you.

Your job is to get the interview and deliver on it. It is not to be in power or look for advantage where you push them around. All that happens if you try to push them around is that you will be rejected.

At the end of the day what you want to be accomplishing is really very simple. You want the in person interview.

If this were to happen during the in-person interview, I would go over to the receptionist and say something like, “I had a [2:30] PM appointment with Jenny. She seems to be running very late. Would you mind checking with her?”  I do this at doctors offices when I walk in.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Don’t Steal | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why you should not steal from recruiters.

Summary

You probably don't think of it this way but let me clear it up. When you see an ad from a recruiter and refers to a job online and you say to yourself, "hey I know that firm is! I think I'll contact them directly," you are stealing. You're taking information that you learned about and using it for your own purposes.

I also want you to understand it's not the smartest move in the world. Why? The recruiter has a relationship with this firm. They know more than you about the organization. They can handle your schedule. They can help you tailor your resume based upon the job involved and the relationship with the firm and what they may know about the job apart from what has been advertised.

Why would you go around them? To save the firm money?

It costs you so much more because 95 times out of 100 people to get the job that they apply to directly without the coaching of a recruiter.

Foolishly, you think you're doing the company a favor. In fact, you're hurting yourself and you are stealing. You are stealing that information to use it for your own purposes without any consideration for the impact on the other person.

Be considerate.

Be kind.

I talked to a friend of mine who is a recruiter with another firm who told me about two instances where people saw one of her postings and went directly to a client and the client dismissed these people and told her the story about them because it was real clear that these people had come to them based upon seeing the advertisement.

Let me summarize by saying, "don't do it." What do you get out of it? Do you feel good about it? Do you feel good that you were tricky and are better than the recruiter?

Or you're going to get back a recruiter that you don't even know for all the things that happened to you at the hands of recruiters?

Stop it. Seriously, be considerate to everyone that you meet professionally because you don't know when it will come back and either help you or hurt you.

Help you because you are considered to the other person or hurt you because you acted obnoxiously.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

You’re Kidding Yourself

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out a common misconception people have when they think about recruiters.

Summary

Recruiters. Very charged topic. When I look around at people and their opinion of recruiters, they are universally criticized, complained about and thought poorly of.

Part of it stems from the fact that you have a misconception about who the recruiter works for. Most people think that recruiters work for them; it doesn't work that way.

If the will, how much you paying for that service? And you think you're working for you?

The fact of the matter is that recruiters are hired by organizations to fill jobs. If you fit the requirement do you think you're going to get on the phone and call companies and say, "hi! I've got this great candidate! You've really got to talk with them! They are terrific! Best person I've ever spoken with! Sorry, you don't need someone like that?"

And may call after call on your behalf trying to market you the companies.

It doesn't work that way. Recruiters work with organization that defined a need for a person with a certain kind of background and go out and find. They are paid for that service. To do that they need to find someone like you.

I say like you because it may not be you. It may involve someone with a different set of skills. Even if you have the same skills as the firm is looking for, do you think they're only sending in one person? Of course not!

They are going to send it is many is the client will let them submit in order to ensure that they collect the fee. By sending in a lot of people the recruiter is hoping to encourage them to make a choice of one of the candidates.

Why do they do this? Because they want to earn a fee.

They are not relying upon placing you and you don't fit. What they care about is referring someone… Anyone… Will satisfy the client and being hired by, then work 90 calendar days and receive a check from the company.

Recruiters need to look out for themselves because you are not going to pay them anything! This is not social work; this is recruiting. Unless they refer someone who is hired, a contingency third-party recruiter will not be paid.

Why do you think they are any different than you in looking out for their own interests? Respectfully, when you think the recruiter is working for you you are deluding yourself.

Yes, to earn their fee, they have to find someone who fits the role the client to specified and will work there successfully for 90 calendar days.

Why do you think this person is any different than you in looking out for their interest?

At the end of the day if it is not you, they are hoping that it is someone else that they are representing. That way, they will make a substantial chunk of money.

So don't kid yourself and think that recruiters are working for you. As many of you know they aren't and that's a fact

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

JobSearchTV.com

Your Biggest Mistake Working With Recruiters | JobSearchTV.com

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out the biggest mistake job hunters make when they think about working with recruiters.  

Summary

Today, I want talk with you about your expectations of working with a recruiter and point out to you that they may be out of whack.

Most people have the mistaken notion that a recruiter works for them. That is the job hunter you're in charge and the recruiter is working for you. That’s partially right. To understand who are recruiter works for, ask yourself how much are you paying them? Seriously, how much you paying them? Nothing. Who's paying the recruiter? The employer. Do you think a recruiter is going to go out once they have your resume and knock on thousands of doors until they find a job for you?

No. That's a working for you really means. It means that they are out there trying to find a job for you; in point of fact, since employers are paying recruiters, they’re working for the employer and what they're trying to do more often than not is finesse you into the square box that the employer has defined in terms of job, in terms of compensation, in terms of role and responsibilities . . . Every step along the line. If you don't fit that box, you're not on their radar screen.

When they get a job, when they find the job the fits you, have no fear period They will get back in touch. But understand, they are not working for you. They’re really working for the employer.

Now, I also don’t want to ignore the fact that, ultimately, they have to listen to you and work with your constructs and your needs, wants and desires in order to fill a position. But, if you think your number one, in their book, you are very confused because, ultimately, as is in your life, the person who pays you is the one to whom the loyalty exists.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes, “Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Sh*t Recruiters Say


Another little tidbit recruiters say.

What sh*t have recruiters said to you? 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching throughout your search, interview coaching or help with a salary negotiation?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line. In the body of the email, tell me what you would like help with.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”