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How to Work Contingency Recruiters | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2011) NOTE: if I mentioned any jobs later in the show were filled the years ago. PLUS I no longer do recruiting. I’m an executive job search and business life coach.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Why Do Recruiters Ask How The Interview Went? (VIDEO)


Here I answer a question from someone who wants to know why recruiters ask how the interview went after someone meets 1 of their clients.

Summary

This question is, "Why do recruiters ask how the interview went?"

We like to debrief the candidate about how their experience was. , There are a number of reasons why this happens, ranging from the innocuous (recruiters really want to know how it went.) to more manipulative reasons. There are other terms for it, but they're not coming to mind right now.

1. We want to know if you've learned something about the job that might be useful to us we have interviewing. After all, sometimes employers don't communicate changes to a job description. They just contact number of recruiters and although they may be talking to the recruiters with some regularity, they may forget to tell the recruiter that they change their thinking about some aspect of the job.

That's one thing, "So how do they explain the position to you," might be 1 of the follow-up questions.

The sequence of questions might go, "How did the interview go?"

"Uh-huh."

"And what sort of things that they ask you about?" There, a recruiters trying to find out the questions you might've been asked.

"How do they explain the position to you?" If the role, sometimes the job description is missing some significant pieces to it that indicate is tantalizing or maybe defective about the job. "Why would anyone want to do this?"

There are a lot of reasons why recruiters would ask that question, including the basic but now one that says, "I want to know if I have a chance of earning a fee with you."

I also want to know whether I should call the client because if you say, "Oh! It was terrible. They just beat me to a pulp." Why would I want to put my head in the noose and putting myself in the position of calling my client and going, "Hi! How to go?" Then I would discover it was bad and get link to your bad performance. The recruiter would remember that I was the person who referred you and then be harder to get more interviews.

The reasons why are primarily to gain information but is also to find out whether or not you might do a placement, whether you are the one who might be hired and whether the recruiter might earn a commission.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com and then forward your question to the same address.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How Do I Reach Out to a Recruiter Who Reached Out to Me A Year Ago? | JobSearchTV.com


A recruiter reached out to me a year ago about a position but I wasn’t interested. Now, I decided to look for a job. How do I reach out to them? Is there any etiquette about doing that?

Summary

I received a question from someone that I thought was interesting.The question is, "How can I reach out to a recruiter who contacted me a year ago? Is there an etiquette to keep in mind?"

Hopefully you kept etiquette in mind when you rebuffed the outreach from them. Hopefully you weren't rude, obnoxious, or cause them to question their sanity and ever reaching out to you. Believe it or not, some people act like jerks. That's true of recruiters, obviously, but job hunters do it in spades to say the least.

if you are courteous when they reached out to you and said something along the lines of, "Thank you for reaching out. That wasn't my time to consider other things. It now is." The more drawn out way to do it that I think would work best is, "A year ago you reached out to me about a search that you were doing. I wasn't ready to make a change. Now I am. I would like to schedule time with you. Would you like to see my resume 1st?"

With an executive search firm, with the retained search recruiters, unless they have a position open for what your background would be a fit, you probably won't hear from them.. With a contingency recruiting firm, that's usually the case, as well, but you may get a phone call from them just to clarify your background now. Regardless, there is no harm to reaching out as long as you're well mannered and present yourself decently.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. Will

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchTV.com

How Long Does It Take to Screen Resumes? | JobSearchTV.com


Someone from a smaller firm asks how long it takes to screen resumes because they think they are spending too much money for an external recruiter.

Summary

The question for today is, "How long does it take to screen resumes?" This question is asked from the vantage point of an employer who is using a recruiter, who is finding good, but not great candidates for them. As they write, "For each position, we get 3 to 5 candidates who are referred to the hiring manager." They are thinking of bringing the process in-house and using tools like ziprecruiter and Workable. They are recruiting for IT positions. . "How long is it going take 2 narrow things down to get those same 3 to 5 options?"

The real question I want to start off pointing out is most people undervalue a recruiter and what they do. After all, you are seeing the results of their efforts (those 3 to 5 resumes); you don't know what they did to get those 3 to 5 resumes. For example, you are looking at those 3 to 5 resumes and thinking to yourself, "I can get 3 to 5 resumes if I use those tools. What's the problem?"

So the problem starts off with who is going to screen those resumes when people apply for your position? Who is going to do the pre-interview with them? Who is going to evaluate the respondents? I know what I was doing recruiting, I would receive hundreds of pieces of garbage that were little more than spam. Some systems may have a data dictionary that will screen resumes for particular keywords; sometimes the system is messed things. If you're okay with that, let's move on.

Using myself as an example, on Monday morning. It was typical for me to walk into 200 to 250 resumes and then have to start going through them. In the usual 3 to 5 seconds that normally is used, you do the math – – if I operated like a machine. It was actually able to do each resume in 5 seconds, with 5 seconds to open up the next one and delete the previous one, it is 6 resumes per minute. If I received 250 resumes, it may take a little bit more than 40 minutes to go through them.

But I get interrupted, I get distracted and I am not a machine. It is boring to read little more than spam , and you have to take a few seconds to figure out, "What are they saying that they do" before you delete it.

As I said in early podcast of Job Search Radio, out of those 250 resumes. I may actually interview to people. Let's use your own math here. You're stuck in this position of going through resumes to find, perhaps, to the might vaguely appear qualified ... It may take about 2 hours of labor time.

Remember, there are days that go by where I'm not even seem to resumes that are worth my calling. It is awful, but it is true. So in the context of finding those 3 to 5 people that you want to locate on your own, you will probably take several days and that is before you start pre-interviewing people before deciding to forward them to the hiring manager.

Now, remember, all the math I'm referring to here is with "dedicated effort." However, with a firm that is small, you are not going to have a dedicated resource doing this. Doing this is going to be ancillary to their job. After all, if you had someone dedicated to this resource already, you wouldn't be asking this question! This person would already be doing the prescreening for you and you wouldn't be using a recruiter.

This is a small firm and this will be an "add-on function" to someone's workday and it will take more time than you think. If you're okay with that, that's fine. But that's really what you're paying the external recruiter to do. You are paying them to do that screening to reduce it to those 3 to 5 potential hires.

I would say that easily it can take a week to a week and 1/2 to identify those 3 to 5 people while this person is doing something else.

If that is worth it to you, if that expenditure of time which may prove out to be pointless (that's because the people that they identify may not fit either.), go ahead and bring it in-house. If you are not sure and you want to cut your costs, instead of doing all of this, reduce your recruiter fee. Reduce it by 2%. If you are currently paying a 25% fee, make it 23%. If you are paying a 20% fee, make it 18%.

Simply say, "I want to continue to give you an exclusive on these jobs. We are evaluating internal resources , and I want to continue to consider you because you been very helpful to us and this might be a way that we can get around it."

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Measuring The Right Thing When You Hire (VIDEO)


If Peter Drucker is right, you can’t manage what you don’t measure. But what if you are managing the wrong thing? What if your measurements are incomplete?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice and encouragement, visit my website, <a href="http://
www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com” >www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Ready to schedule your first coaching call? https://gum.co/JAcoaching

Interview Questions to Determine Emotional Intelligence (VIDEO)


As organizations grow or expand, emotional intelligence becomes a more important factor when interviewing new leaders. In this video I offer several basic questions that any person can ask to assess for whether someone is self-aware.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice and encouragement, visit my website, <a href="http://
www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com” >www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Ready to schedule your first coaching call? https://gum.co/JAcoaching

JobSearchTV.com

How Do I Recognize a Good Recruiter or Headhunting Firm? | JobSearchTV.com


My answer to this question is crystal clear.

Summary

Today's question,

"How Do I Recognize a Good Recruiter or Headhunting Firm? "

I'm going to give you the answer that you don't want to hear… But it is the truth.

The answer is you can't.

You can pickup a clue or 2 along the way but I think the issue is the disconnect between what you define as a good recruiter and what a client might define as a good recruiter.

To you, a good recruiter is someone who can find you a job.  To a corporation, a good recruiter is someone who can fill a position, who has good discernment, who has the ability to understand a person's experience and ability. Who can understand with their particular corporate culture was like, save them time and deliver great potential new hires to them.  The recruiter can't guarantee that the firm will actually hire someone from them, but they can't deliver good quality potential hires that make the decision difficult for an employer.

Let me go back to you, for example.

You want to hire someone who is a good recruiter or as a good headhunting firm.  As a result, they have to have jobs that fit you.  That basically translates into seeing what jobs that they have to fill in job hunters have a pretty loose idea of what fits their background. Judging by what I received in my inbox each day which tends to be hundred to 150 pieces of email that are little more than spam.

You send a resume to someone, you don't hear back. And you say to yourself, "Hey! This is a bad recruiter. They didn't call me!"  However, you send a resume that did nothing to demonstrate that you are qualified for the role that they are trying to fill. So, to you, a good recruiter is always going to be the one who finds you a job.

I think there are clues to a successful recruiter or a good recruiter through longevity with one agency. For example, if you see someone who has been with the firm for 10 or 15 years, you know they are filling jobs. You know that firm has an environment for them that allows them to be able to perform at a high level for their corporate clients. That's one indicator that guarantees that there is a possibility they could be effective for you, but there are no guarantees.

How can you recognize a good headhunting firm?

Longevity is normally a variable. As the firm did in operation for, I don't know, pick a number of years? However, there are people who start off firms who may be out on their own now. They had been with the firm for 10 or 15 years and recently started a search firm that is only been open for 3 months. Does that make them less capable? I don't think so.

I don't think size of firm matters. After all, you can contact Robert Half, 1 of the largest recruiting firms in the world or Manpower, again, 1 of the largest recruiting firms in the world, you got the wrong person, what happens is that they miss out on opportunities for you. They aren't sending you out on things because he got the wrong person at the right firm. To be clear, I am not endorsing either of those firms in case you misconstrue that I was using their names as an endorsement. I was just using them as an example of huge firms in the recruiting sector.

There are boutique firms that do a far better job than the larger firms, but they are specialized or "narrow focused." They may be a part of a network of recruiting firms like n NPA Worldwide that allows firms to have good market penetration so that even though this person might be a solopreneur, they have access to 500+ other recruiting firms around the world and can submit your resume to affiliates in other places. Again, it doesn't guarantee anything.

At the end of the day, I think the issue comes down to the question and how the question really implies, "Who can get me a job?" Remember, there are no guarantees. After all, all they can do is get you in the door. They can't get you the job because your performance on the interviews may stink, your expectations may be atrocious, the resume is even worse, yada, yada, yada.

The fact is 70% of all positions are filled as a result of networking. 70% of those 70% are filled. As a result of introductions to people that you didn't know at the beginning of your job search. You need to go out there and network and not just simply outsource your efforts to recruiting firms. Don't just simply apply to job boards because, between job boards and recruiting firms, they only fill 30% of all jobs.

Don't be a fool. Get out there and start meeting new people. Start talking to others. Don't outsource just to recruiters.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

The Three Jokes of Recruiting |No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter uses the three jokes of recruiting in order to teach an important lesson about job hunting.

honeypot2

 

spp-transcript]

I want to talk with you about the 3 jokes of the recruiting business.

The 1st joke is, “How can you tell a job applicant is lying to you?”  The answer is, “Their lips are moving.

What’s the 2nd joke?

How can you tell a client is lying to you?

Their lips are moving.”

The 3rd joke is, “How can you tell he recruiter was lying to you?”  You guessed it – – their lips are moving.

 

When you basically translate it, what is being said is that everyone is posturing for advantage and the best outcome.  Everyone is exaggerating to some degree.

For you as a job hunter. You have to remember that the company may be talking with you about this great opportunity for you to advance when in most cases, what they really want to do is is hire the 4th drone in the 3rd cubicle on the 5th floor of a particular building.  You are not particularly important to them.

You may be important to that particular manager, but that manager, when times get tough, may not be they are any longer than you are.

In terms of the recruiter, the recruiter is posturing to engender trust in you. That’s because if you are unsure you may trust their words and allow yourself to take a job.

Now, if we were talking about an investment advisor and they were saying, “Trust me. Give me $50,000. Yeah. That’s the ticket yeah, trust me with the money.” You would be very hesitant. With the recruiter, you need to take your time before giving away your trust.

Finally, I understand that you are trying to get the best of the deal possible and you are trying to position yourself well. Everyone is kind of like 8-year-olds who are visiting their friends’ parents. Invariably, the 8-year-old is on good behavior over there, right? Well, everyone is on good behavior as part of the search process.

Your goal is to get the best information that you can in order to make a good decision for yourself. It’s not to be a good boy. It’s not to be a good girl. It’s to get the best information possible so that you can make a great choice, so that your career advances and you can get to where you want.

 

[/spp-transcript]

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Turn It Up! | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter shares some of his observations about working with recruiters and applies it to job hunting.

Serious mature businessman on call in front of laptop at desk in a bright office

Summary

In my career, I’ve trained a lot of very successful recruiters. I’ve also trained some people who have washed out.  I put my best effort to try to help these people. But, when push comes to shove, ultimately, the onus falls on them to follow through a lot of the coaching that I give. Often, the biggest failure is around effort.

Most people (including job hunters in this) say they want to do a hard days work and they want to put in. Best effort. They want to be successful BUT when you examine what they do, they are not working as hard as they think they are.  That is true of job hunters, too.

How People Find Jobs

For you as a job hunter, statistically, people are finding work in a number of ways.  Consistently, statistics show, the job boards fill between 3% and 4% of all positions.  Recruiters fill an additional 20% to 22%.  I’m going to combine the numbers because some recruiters use job boards to find candidates.  And I will add a little more than that.  So, let’s assume that 30% are filled by job boards and by recruiters.  

70%, though, is filled as a result of networking.  In a recent statistic that I heard, 70% that of those jobs (70% of the 70%) or filled as a result of a network connection to someone that they didn’t know at the beginning of the job search.

Here’s the point.  You are not working as hard as you can to find people to connect with and develop a relationship with in order to become 1 of those people in the 70%.  What you need to be doing is putting in a “Max effort.”  You need to try that much harder, to operate at a much higher capacity than you are now.  I’m not saying to work like a maniac.  You need to have some fun and there, too.  At the end of the day, you need to kick it up some notches. You need to put yourself out there with some people you are not really talking to yet.  You need to track these relationships so that, in this way, you remember your conversations, what your commitments are and follow-up… Stuff flows along those lines… When push comes to shove, you have to kick it up. Some notches.

Again, it’s not who applies to the most jobs on the job board.  You are swimming in the lake with a lot of hooks out when you’re swimming in job boards.  There is a lot of competition with other fish in their for that hook.  You want to be out there swimming in streams and rivers that have hooks out there, but not a lot of fish there. This way, you are able to swim up and be able to connect with the organization.  In addition, you need to be able to come in with a referral from someone you know.

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Marketing Yourself Like a Headhunter | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks with you about marketing yourself just like headhunters market themselves.

marketing-yourself

Summary

Let's talk today about what headhunters do in their work.

Answer.  They are doing business development work to identify potential clients that want to hire. [/spp-transcript]

How are they doing that?

There are a variety of different ways but the primary way is called:.  They are networking.  You're trying to find people who will give them a name, phone number and/or email address of someone to reach out to who is hiring.

More often than not they are doing what is called telemarketing.  They are on the phone, presenting themselves as human beings who have skills and capabilities that can help an organization fill positions.

Telemarketing works.  It is still the most effective way that salespeople sell.  They may get leads in a variety of different ways but being on the phone, causes them to do the sale.

You need to be doing the same thing.

How do you get those leads?  There are a variety of different ways.  You know about LinkedIn. Have you considered data.com? Spoke.com?  How about zoominfo.com?

These are all sites that provide you with names and the position of potential hiring managers.  In this way, if you are going to submit your resume to affirm, you can use a backdoor way to reach out to someone and present yourself as a human being, different than just a resume submitted to an applicant tracking system.  Different than just a resume that submitted or referred by someone.

They can hear you on the phone, even if you are just leaving a voicemail.  It's an opportunity to present a case for yourself.

Again, I just want to encourage you.  Get on the phone.  Don't just simply rely on applicant tracking systems, emails or even introductions.  Reach out to people so that they know something about you.  They get a sense of your enthusiasm, passion and excitement for what you do, just from the tone of your voice.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes