Bad Employer Behavior | No BS Hiring Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/nobshiringadvice/2016/01/14/bad-employer-behavior

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter attempts to discourage you from engaging in some of the offensive and rude hiring practices she maybe employers engage in.

Read Full Transcript

Hi, I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. And I'm back with more No BS Hiring Advice to help you make your next hire more quickly. Now, this is a video that talks about some of the mistakes employers make in their assessment process.

I want to start by saying all these come from conversations I've had with people, or almost all of them come from conversations I've had with people in recent times. One or two of them are memories of mine from some time back. But, these are pretty common instances.

The first one, you know, and this is a friend of mine who wrote to me about this, involves not showing any interest in the person they're interviewing. So that shows up when you're doing a Skype session with someone, and they're watching you looking down taking notes, never making eye contact. Why don't you make it a Skype anyway, if you're not going to look at the person. If you've already rejected them within two minutes, well, you shouldn't have scheduled theirtime and wasted it, like you did. So, pay attention. Give the job applicant attention during the interview. After all, do really want to see them on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn talking about your bad behavior? I doubt it. So, number one, give them some attention.

Number two is, you've asked someone to set aside a certain amount of time for the interview. Use it. Have a prepared interview script that you're working with, so that you make sure that you're covering the basics that you want to attend to in the course of this meeting. Don't just wing it. Use their time well. Use your time well evaluating talent.

Number three is you act as though you're God's gift and your job is God's gift to humanity and this person has no other choices but to go to work for you. Huh? How rude is that? How do you feel? How do you think you'd feel if you were treated in that way? Why do you want to treat other people in such a manner? It's ridiculous.

Next is your jobs description, the one that you advertised that caused someone to apply for this position doesn't resemble the reality of what the job is. So, this person comes in to talk with you about a job and they discover along the way, it doesn't match up with what they understand from the job description. They ask some follow up questions and you become indignant. It's a joke. So, you know, you basically wind up being rude to someone and it's your fault. So, make sure that your job descriptions have a basis in reality and, as a result, you're valuing their time.

Don't ask stupid interview questions that don't relate to the job in evaluating people on their qualifications for the role.Yes, there's a place for brainteasers but, to me, the real answer is how they respond to the brainteaser, not the specific answer. Brain teasers are a waste. Even Google says so and I'm sure you know that already. Don't bother with stupid questions. You're there to evaluate and assess people in order to determine whether they have the knowledge that will cause them to be effective in the job. Then, from there, you want to a very cursory basis, get a sense of personality. And I say "cursory" because, clearly, you want to hire smart people. If that's the kind of people that you hire, you don't want to hire smart people if you have a clerical job and you know that the nature of the smartness is a little bit different than each. The meticulous attention to detail of a clerical job may not be needed, and may require a different version of smarts than the executive team.

But at the end of the day, you want to hire people that have an affinity with your group without enforcing your own biases, your own bigotry in the process. Are you young and have a thing about old people because it reminds you of your mom or dad? These folks, are there just to do a job. They're not there to be your mom.

Are you white and you don't want to hire black people because you're racist? Or conversely? Are you a person who is black or from a foreign nation who doesn't like to hire American Caucasians? Sheet over it. Be smart about these things, and don't have your own biases get in the way of hiring really talented people.

Here's my last point and that involves negotiation. I have seen way too many firms trying to take advantage of Job Hunters, by offering lowball salaries as though these people are morons and don't know what they can afford and are morons and don't know that they've walked in asking for X amount of money. And you're asking them to take $25,000 less for staff level positions and $50 or $60,000 less to take an executive position.

You know, treat people fairly. If you think you're going to come in low, evaluate their financial thoughts early, so you don't waste people's time, and you don't waste your own time.

Hi, I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. And I'm back with more No BS Hiring Advice to help you make your next hire more quickly. Now, this is a video that talks about some of the mistakes employers make in their assessment process.

I want to start by saying all these come from conversations I've had with people, or almost all of them come from conversations I've had with people in recent times. One or two of them are memories of mine from some time back. But, these are pretty common instances.

The first one, you know, and this is a friend of mine who wrote to me about this, involves not showing any interest in the person they're interviewing. So that shows up when you're doing a Skype session with someone, and they're watching you looking down taking notes, never making eye contact. Why don't you make it a Skype anyway, if you're not going to look at the person. If you've already rejected them within two minutes, well, you shouldn't have scheduled theirtime and wasted it, like you did. So, pay attention. Give the job applicant attention during the interview. After all, do really want to see them on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn talking about your bad behavior? I doubt it. So, number one, give them some attention.

Number two is, you've asked someone to set aside a certain amount of time for the interview. Use it. Have a prepared interview script that you're working with, so that you make sure that you're covering the basics that you want to attend to in the course of this meeting. Don't just wing it. Use their time well. Use your time well evaluating talent.

Number three is you act as though you're God's gift and your job is God's gift to humanity and this person has no other choices but to go to work for you. Huh? How rude is that? How do you feel? How do you think you'd feel if you were treated in that way? Why do you want to treat other people in such a manner? It's ridiculous.

Next is your jobs description, the one that you advertised that caused someone to apply for this position doesn't resemble the reality of what the job is. So, this person comes in to talk with you about a job and they discover along the way, it doesn't match up with what they understand from the job description. They ask some follow up questions and you become indignant. It's a joke. So, you know, you basically wind up being rude to someone and it's your fault. So, make sure that your job descriptions have a basis in reality and, as a result, you're valuing their time.

Don't ask stupid interview questions that don't relate to the job in evaluating people on their qualifications for the role.Yes, there's a place for brainteasers but, to me, the real answer is how they respond to the brainteaser, not the specific answer. Brain teasers are a waste. Even Google says so and I'm sure you know that already. Don't bother with stupid questions. You're there to evaluate and assess people in order to determine whether they have the knowledge that will cause them to be effective in the job. Then, from there, you want to a very cursory basis, get a sense of personality. And I say "cursory" because, clearly, you want to hire smart people. If that's the kind of people that you hire, you don't want to hire smart people if you have a clerical job and you know that the nature of the smartness is a little bit different than each. The meticulous attention to detail of a clerical job may not be needed, and may require a different version of smarts than the executive team.

But at the end of the day, you want to hire people that have an affinity with your group without enforcing your own biases, your own bigotry in the process. Are you young and have a thing about old people because it reminds you of your mom or dad? These folks, are there just to do a job. They're not there to be your mom.

Are you white and you don't want to hire black people because you're racist? Or conversely? Are you a person who is black or from a foreign nation who doesn't like to hire American Caucasians? Sheet over it. Be smart about these things, and don't have your own biases get in the way of hiring really talented people.

Here's my last point and that involves negotiation. I have seen way too many firms trying to take advantage of Job Hunters, by offering lowball salaries as though these people are morons and don't know what they can afford and are morons and don't know that they've walked in asking for X amount of money. And you're asking them to take $25,000 less for staff level positions and $50 or $60,000 less to take an executive position.

You know, treat people fairly. If you think you're going to come in low, evaluate their financial thoughts early, so you don't waste people's time, and you don't waste your own time.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1500 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.” He is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council. “No BS JobSearch Advice Radio” was recently named a Top 10 podcast for job search. JobSearchTV.com was also recently named a Top 10 YouTube channel for job search.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

No BS Hiring Advice Radio
No BS Hiring Advice Radio

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