EP 1975 Karalyn Brown hosts a LinkedIn Live called, “Career Care Package,” with her co-host , Naishadh Gadani, Monday – Friday. Her perspective is refreshing and useful.

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Jeff
So my guest today is Karalyn Brown, who you'll discover is not from Brooklyn, New York with an unusual accent. Karalyn is someone who's been recruiting for a long time and is hosting lots of LinkedIn live. So we're going to be talking about what she's learned from doing all these LinkedIn lives with regard to networking. Karalyn, welcomes and introduces yourself to my audience.

Karalyn
Okay, thank you. Thank you for having me. So I'm Down under and probably down in the down, so I'm based down in Melbourne, in Australia. And so yes, you're right. I've been in recruitment for a long time, but about 15 years ago, I flipped my career and I escaped the corporate world and I decided to start my own consultancy interview IQ. So from that point on, I've been helping people find jobs: so working on resumes, LinkedIn profiles, interview coaching. I run a stretch shortlist challenge, helping people learn how to network and approach people directly for jobs and bypass recruiters.

And yes, so from March this year, from mid-March this year, I've been doing a daily LinkedIn live with a co-host nation GoDaddy. And we decided that we would be very present for people during a really terrible time during the lockdown, and people losing jobs, and tall stuff careers. So that's what I've been doing daily every day at three o'clock, and every weekday at three o'clock.

Jeff
And that's Melbourne time, of course.

Karalyn
Melbourne time, yes. So it's probably some hideous hour on your side of the world. But, and from time to time we do, and we've had quite a few guests from the States, so sometimes we've done 10 o'clock in the morning, sorry, 10 o'clock at night our time. So we've had guests from all over the world, actually, which has been pretty amazing.

Jeff
Very gracious of you to accommodate the rest of the world on your schedule.

Karalyn
I am used to it.

Jeff
And first of all, I want to start by saying I am very envious that you've had access to LinkedIn live. I've been pleading with them for the longest time. The with more than 6000 videos on YouTube, you know, the number one podcast on Apple podcasts for job search. I switch all my YouTube work over to LinkedIn. They've yet, I've said this to them, but they have yet to bless me for having access to LinkedIn live.

Karalyn
Yeah, we know the weird thing; Jeff is that they originally gave up. We do02:34 [Inaudible]. He's my co-host, so we do via his stream. But they gave me LinkedIn live, and then they took it away from me because I didn't use it. So I had access for a few weeks, and then I went to go to use it; and I'm like, "Oh, I don't have access anymore. So it is in beta form so I guess, but I think it just be, they would be overwhelmed if they released it out to everybody, but it sounds like you've definitely got a worthy cause to get it.

Jeff
Yeah, I agree. Let's start talking to folks about lessons that you've learned about networking, from running these LinkedIn live. So what would you say your first lesson is?

Karalyn
Well, I think it's, you've got to make it a habit. And we procrastinated; I procrastinated for such a long time about doing video. I'm an intermittent blogger, and I've always chastised myself for like, not blogging regularly. But when the pandemic hit, it was like, I got to do something. And the biggest lesson was, if you make it a habit, you do it, it's no harder than actually just making it a habit. So for the first one and a half hours or two hours of my workday, I don't schedule anything else, except working on what we're going to be putting up on the show and marketing, the show, and that type of thing. So yeah, just to schedule, it is probably my number one takeaway. If you're going to network, schedule, the time, otherwise, it won't happen; because it's always an investment. It's a future investment; it's not something that pays immediate rewards.

And folks, I am going to interject here and simply say, not only when you're job hunting you should be making it a habit, it's when you're not job hunting, that you make it a habit because otherwise, you're pretty invisible.

Karalyn
Yeah.

Jeff
And then no one knows about you, and then you need some help, and then you're scrambling and no one's going to do it when you're desperate.

It's the thing that because not everybody says yes, right? If you think about networking, reaching out to people, not everybody says yes, so it actually takes a long time to really build up a solid network. So you're way behind the eight -ball if start, when you absolutely need to do it, basically.

Jeff
Oh, yeah. And it's way too late at that point.

Karalyn
Yeah.

Jeff
You come across as a desperate person.

Karalyn
Absolutely.

Jeff
And whether it's in dating or in job hunting.....

Karalyn
Yes.

Jeff
No one likes desperate people under those conditions.

Karalyn
05:13 [Inaudible], yes. And also, it's kind of thing too, you know that there's that sound you like give before you need, right? So you're very needy when people can smell that kind of neediness. So the thing about doing, say, LinkedIn lives is that we're not asking anything of anyone except for their time to appear, but there's benefit in that for them, like, you know, and appearing on your podcast in your video. There's a benefit to me. So a lot of people would say yes, but when you're reaching out for a job, then you can expect a lot of people to say, "No", or just ignore you, basically,

Jeff
Most of you, senior people know this, that this is something that has to be part of your efforts on an on-going basis. And when you don't have the habit, particularly when you're single, it comes back to haunt you. And I know there's one person I've been coaching, I have been working with him for a year, he'd been out of work for a long time as a consultant. He and his wife are moving to the west coast of the United States; and through his networking, he got an introduction to someone who's very well known in the risk management world. And he's had weekly phone calls with this man, for probably six months. As that fellow starts to figure out whether he's worth having the relationship with; what he really knows, and whether he substantial enough and now they're going to collaborate on a paper together. And the paper is going to become a huge calling card for him. The other man is that is the well-known individual in the space, the guy I'm working with is not. And it's suddenly going to allow him to have increased branding, reputation, and visibility all because of his association with the other.

Folks, don't waste time, just get into the mix of things, and don't worry about whether or not people respond to you right away. Sometimes 07:26 [cross talking].

Karalyn
I am sorry, I didn't mean to interrupt, but you can definitely expect a non-response. So with the straight to short, this challenge that I do, I say to people, so we reach out to people called, accepting that most people won't network before they need to use is why I started the 07:44 [Inaudible]. So I say to people when you're reaching out to people, expect about 25% yes rate for a complete stranger that you don't know, to say yes to meeting you. And that puts it into perspective for people and they don't take it so personally. But yeah, it is the heart effort, I think, to start completely cold and then reach out and try and build that warm relationship from zero.

Jeff
Agreed; and the funny thing is, folks when you hear 25% response, some of you I'm sure, gasping but I'll remind you, how many are you responding to?

Karalyn
So true, it's so true; and I've done lots, and lots, and lots of outreach. Generally, I say to people, it's kind of like a shake your expectation thing I say, expect a 25%, but you can get up to 50 or 60%, so people don't take the no so personally and keep trying. So yeah, it's a bit of a psychological thing that I do with a challenge.

Jeff
So number one is to make it a habit.

Karalyn
Yeah.

Jeff
What would you say the second thing is that you've learned from your networking, about networking through LinkedIn lives?

Karalyn
Well, LinkedIn lives pretty brutal and pretty raw, right? So you just jump on at three o'clock or whatever time. And so we've had screen fuzzy, people drop out, whatever, but I've learned that it's fun. Because a lot of people won't put themselves in that spotlight, but I've learned it doesn't matter if stuff goes wrong. And I've learned that it's fun. And there are so many people out there that have got great stories to tell and really fantastic insights of people. Yeah, you can actually enjoy that opportunity to interact with people that you don't know. And that's what I discovered about myself is like, I think I was avoiding doing it because, in my mind, I was thinking it's not going to be fun, but it actually has been a hold lot of fun.

Jeff
Did you make the mistake of thinking you were supposed to be professional?

Karalyn
Oh, that's right. I was traveling, how can I be professional?

Jeff
Thank goodness.

Karalyn
Oh, yeah, no, that's right. I mean, we are professional, but the mistakes happen, right? And that's just what happens. So people haven't been perfect. We've had guests on that have talked probably too much like I'm doing and lost track of what they're saying, but, it's been fun. I have to say that this part of being locked down at the bottom of the world, we've reached out to a global audience, and yeah, it's been fun.

Jeff
And one thing I'll say, folks, that most of you think networking is pretty tedious stuff. And you will learn a lot if you just act curiously; and ask questions and invite people to teach you what it's like being them doing what they do. And initially, you may sense a degree of apprehension, because they're waiting for the other shoe to drop off, "Okay, When are they going to ask me about a job"? The reality is, if you focus on being curious about them and learning from them, you will do so much better with your networking, then if you say, "Hi, how are you? "Do you know of any jobs"? No one's going to tell you about a job, under those circumstances, enjoy yourself, learn something. That's what I try and do in these interviews, is learn something from my guest, it works wonders.

Karalyn
It's a funny thing; because I always say, and we've done this on our show, but I always say to people, when we go through that networking conversation is, "You've just got to start with a great opening question". You need to explain why you've selected them and why they're really interesting. But, you know, start with a great opening question around, what do you love about what you do? I'm curious about what you're doing. I'm curious about what you love; and it's kind of like the heat gun question. And once people get talking, it turns into this conversation. And I think if you had a great curious conversation, inevitably people say, "What are you"? You want them to say, "What are you looking to do next"? Do you know what I mean? You don't want to be pushing that. And if you have that great and curious conversation, where they've done most of the talking, that does come up, you don't need to actually push it so much, because they felt heard and respected and valued in that type of thing.

Jeff
One of the things I teach people about interviewing is when you discover that they're doing most of the talking, one of the secrets, when I was doing recruiting, is the more they talk, the more they like you.

Karalyn
Exactly. So I'm really liking you 12:57 [Inaudible].

Jeff
There you have it. I've proven it yet again.

Karalyn
Exactly!

Jeff
And we're laughing about it, but its human nature. Because a part of this is although we're over zoom, we've never physically met, we've spoken once before. Folks, I do a pre-interview before to make sure that anyone I bring on is not a psychopath. They're at least a funny psychopath.

Karalyn
That's right! I'm a psychopath, you can string a sentence together, I think that's probably me.

Jeff
I can work with that.

Karalyn
Okay, do I use that as an intro line?

Jeff
No, it's probably not a good one. But when someone's messaging someone, what do they say in the message to try and get that connection to even have the conversation?

Karalyn
Well, I think the important thing is to me, for example, I'm talking on LinkedIn now. The important thing is to message. A lot of people don't, right? So if you're a complete stranger, and you've got another complete stranger reaching out to you, they don't want to have to guess why. And so basically, it's usually along the lines of, 'Hi', really interested in your profile, and that you've got this experience. I've got that experience as well, I'd love to connect. And sometimes we say and seek some advice from you or career advice. And some of those messages have come back like that literally that 300 character message on LinkedIn. With that, I like to seek some advice or some career advice. Some people have just responded to that and said, "Sure, do you want to have it, what would you like to know"? But it basically then frames up the fact that then you're going to be reaching out if they say yes, and actually, in that email, we do like a follow-up email. So it leads them to expect that, or something like that from the next email is a logical conversation basically.

Jeff
So if I heard you correctly, the idea is through LinkedIn...

Karalyn
Yeah.

Jeff
You’re sending a connection request that explains that our profiles are similar, and I'd like to ask you for some advice.

Karalyn
Yeah.

Jeff
Are you also suggesting they look to people more senior than they and follow that career path?

Karalyn
It really depends on the person, for example, I have a lot of people that are skilled migrants that come to work with me in Australia. I look for people who have an affinity, right? So if you're an Indian coming to Melbourne, and you're a business analyst, we look on LinkedIn for other Indians in Melbourne that are in the same profession; so that person's at the same, at generally at the same level, or might be one above, and generally go, like as a general rule for peers or somebody one level above. But we also seek out people that I call hubs, so people that you can see that they're visibly connected and internetworking, and they might be a leader of a group, they might have a blog, they might have a meet up group. So they may not necessarily be in your, like doing the same role or one above, but they've got a real interest in having a presence and being a connector in the industry; because that's what they do. And those people absolute gold, we've had so many people that have just come back and said, "Oh, wow, that meeting was fantastic. They talked about what they're up to, they're happy to give advice, and so forth.

Jeff
I'm going to translate one or two things that you said for the US audience.

Karalyn
Okay.

Jeff
Skilled migrants translated legal aliens.

Karalyn
Okay.

Jeff
Legal immigrants to the United States; in the United States, we might not use that direct term, but in other countries, there's no issue with that.

Karalyn
Yeah.

Jeff
Recognize folks, there are cultural differences in his communication style, and don't immediately jump down Karalyn, about using terms that you're not comfortable with, in the US and other nationalities and other nations, they are. Okay?

Karalyn
I had no idea that that was something that you wouldn't say, I guess.

Jeff
In the United States, we also deal with the Native Americans who are also called Indians. That's odd because initially, Columbus thought he arrived in India.

Karalyn
Yeah, okay. I can't know speaking from people from India, Pakistan, China, that's what I meant by that.

Jeff
Of course, I know that but again, for the US audience, if anyone has there certainly rrr, I just want to translate that in other cultures, it's perfectly normal.

So we've covered a couple of things so far. We've spoken about making networking a habit, it's fun. Looking for hubs, how you reach out and do reach out through LinkedIn, and look for ways that you could be asking people for advice. And what else have you learned about networking through your LinkedIn live conversations? This is great stuff.

Karalyn
Yeah, well, I think the thing about it is not to ever expect that, it's like that reciprocation, I'd always get that word confused. Reciprocity?

Jeff
Yes.

Karalyn
I got it, okay. Just because you give, it doesn't mean somebody will give back. I think you've got to really understand that, and never ever expect that you've, like, there have been people that we've had on the show that we've built a great relationship with sort of then have ignored every single email afterward. So that I think that's an interesting lesson, you can't take it like, just the act of giving means that some people will give back, but never, never expect that from when you've invested in somebody that that's going to be returned, but just know that somebody will give back. It may not be the person that you're actually expecting. So you can have, for example, a great meeting with people, and then that person might ghost you. So that's all part and parcel of actually, the process. So that was that's been a lesson for us as well. And, we've had a lot of people on our show, but not everybody has responded when we've reached out again, and that type of thing. So it's just the way it goes. It's not personal, but it does happen.

Jeff
Right; and it's fascinating that having had that exposure, they wouldn't reply back later on. And I know that that happens in job hunting with networking too, and with a lot of regularity. But folks, I'm just going to remind you, for those of you who've seen me for a while, you've heard me say, it just takes one. The right one, obviously, and we don't know how that's going to be. But you just need that one who suddenly adopts you and looks out for you, and introduces you to that person who's going to be the one who wants to interview you and perhaps hire you. And like, I use the metaphor of dating all the time; you'll be going to be going on a lot of blind dates. And on those blind dates, not all of them are going to be good; a matter of fact, most of them could be pretty bad,
and then...

Karalyn
Yes, you're going to be kissing the frogs basically; another dating metaphor, there are a lot of frogs out there. But there are a lot of princes or princesses as well, in a nice term, I guess, so yeah, there just is and that's the way it is. And I read some research that really resonated with me that as human beings, we're not that great at judging the reciprocal nature of friendship. So we think, we might describe people as great friends, but they may not describe us as great friends. And if you think of it like that, that makes sense of the whole sort of networking or dating world as well. You just don't know. You might think you're making a terrible impression on somebody, but the act that you've turned out is enough for that person. Do you know what I mean? And then you might be thinking, making a fabulous impression, and you're not.

Jeff
It is amazing how that works. And the parallels with dating are so remarkable. And the number of times you have those circumstances where you really think there's that great connection. Call me.

Karalyn
In silence.

Jeff
Silence forever.

Karalyn
And then there are the mind games, right? Because he goes, and this is a great parallel with job hunting. It’s like, "Oh, it's me, nobody's ever going to say yes to me", and then you stop, right? And that's the worst thing that you can do. And I actually think, I know, with my clients that we're doing the outreach to people, that the people that are most successful are the people that just push on. Like, they actually do make it going back to that habit thing. They do it, they do make a habit of it, and they do set the time aside and just do it. This is the stopping start. They're the people that were I think the mind games start to creep in much more easily, and it's hard for them to keep the momentum up. I don't know if you've noticed that in your work, Jeff.

Jeff
Yes, persistence and resilience are the two key ingredients to any job search. Facing defeat, "You know, oh, that interview went so well, and then nothing". You just have to keep going out there; and someone pointed out to me, he was like a boxing trainer. And he showed me how he trained one of his boxers. And he brought them in front of the mirror, and he said, "See that guy over there, toughest opponent".

Karalyn
Yeah, yeah.

Jeff
And you are your own toughest opponent, folks. You're the one that gives yourself all those negative messages; and most of the time the world really isn't thinking about you at all.

Karalyn
Exactly!

Jeff
But you're talking yourself out of opportunities, just keep plugging/. Don't worry about you didn't get that job. Just keep plugging. What you can control, you control, which is your own behavior. And from there, if you have the marketable skills, eventually no matter what the economy is, like even the freakin pandemic, I've been getting people hired; and early on the pandemic, when everyone was terrified. People were getting hired sight unseen except 24:22 [Inaudible], so just keep plugging, because that's within your control.

Karalyn
Can I just make another point?

Jeff
Of course, you can. That's what a guess does, they make points.

Karalyn
Okay, well, I'm going to make one.

Jeff
Good.

Karalyn
24:39 [cross talking] wagon. And again, this is 101 stuff. But what I've noticed from reaching out to people on LinkedIn myself through LinkedIn lives, but also for people that I work with, is how few people actually pay attention to what's in their LinkedIn profile, which actually makes it incredibly difficult to make a real connection. So if you're wondering, I know it sounds weird because LinkedIn has been around for feels like centuries now, but they’re out of date, they're in the third person, I'll have one line that speaks about their company or nothing else. And it makes it, if you want people to reach out, you have to open yourself up as well, I guess is my point. So having that wealth crafted out LinkedIn profile is a number one thing that you can do to give to other people around networking as well. I don't know if it's the same in the states in Australia. I mean, if people knew how many times people have looked at their LinkedIn profile and what I won't connect with them. You can make your life a hell of a lot easier if you just paid your level of attention to it.

Jeff
I was number 7653.

Karalyn
Oh, wow.

Jeff
I spotted it very early, I read something online; and I said, "Sure". And I joined there was very little there of course, but with time, I learned to open myself up. And I've got a great brand to attract people with the term, The Big Game Hunter, and those people have reached out to me.

But folks, as you think of your profiles, as I remind you again, how will people find you? What terms will they search for in order to discover you? And thus, if you're not sure what those terms are, look at job descriptions. In the job descriptions, if you look at 10, job descriptions, five or six have half common terms related to what you do, those are the ones that should be your profile. And now the outlier terms that may be used less frequently, but clearly the ones that are the dominant ones you should be using all the time. And thus, that's the core is the profile, and then from there, what you can do is more things to draw attention to yourself so that people are curious about you; whether it's writing, sharing video, now they have LinkedIn stories. Ooh, now we're a short video recorded from your phone, about something happening in your life or your day. It's a nice little service that they've introduced, and there's a lot more you can do.

Folks, when you're trying to be the aggressor, your resume has to be the tool that tracks, but the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest, they don't always work the hardest. People get ahead by being alert to opportunity. And most of the time, it's external to their organization. And the way people find you, is you want to be hunted by them, and your profile is the way that they do it.

And as I had a conversation with an executive recruiter in the UK, and as he said, "It's everyone's database now". 28:13 [inaudible] these exquisite databases that they cultivated on their own, but now LinkedIn with, as of this recording almost 700 million people, you don't have to create your own.

Karalyn
And it comes down to the relationship that people have, and the brand, and the recruiter. And I think, recruiters are the better ones, knowing that they need to nurture those things, nurture their pipeline and that type of thing. But yeah, it the whole database, if you think of it, the whole database has been open to, you're open to being found and that type of thing. It's a funny thing like I was just reflecting, as you're saying. When I went to change my career from being incorporate into doing what I do now, I deliberately went out and crafted a profile on Google, knowing that people would Google my name. And I didn't have any background or, any proven skills in doing what I'm doing. But I wanted them to see that I knew what I was talking about, so I went in and wrote for some organizations and some papers and made sure that I could be found on Google around that. And I think that that helped me actually make that transition; and now like 15 years on, there's no excuse not to do it because it's so easy to put an update on LinkedIn, or even do a small blog post, or a story, or get involved in a group. It's very easy to be visible. And I'm surprised still people don't do, I don't think people do enough of it.

Jeff
I'm too busy. I got a job to do. I can't do that. Like you don't commute, folks. Give me a break!

Karalyn
You remind me not to get on the wrong side of you, Jeff.

Jeff
I'm a sweetheart.

Karalyn
Okay.

Jeff
But my podcast is no BS job search advice. So I'm very directive with the advice and I call people out for their nonsense and do it in a playful kind of way. So I'll just simply say, "You do have the time, it doesn't take long". Like, if you're going to write a blog post, I understand why you might want to craft it, but a quick story, a quick video that you share, even if you're sharing someone else's post it through repeated action, you start to get seen as the expert; and it takes no time other than share. How tough is that, folks?

Karalyn
Exactly! I might steal that one.

Jeff
Thank you.

Karalyn
Okay.

Jeff
And what have we talked about yet that we should?

Karalyn
I don't know. I'm just trying to think of the other things. Okay, so I think going back to what we've done with LinkedIn, live and create a care package, people have found jobs about but and again, this is one on one stuff, but it's worthwhile reinforcing. People have found jobs from, interacting in the community that have comments and people that talk and whatever. They go there at three o'clock every day, and they made their old friends after three or four months, and people have found jobs from that process of just connecting up with other people, and taking it from there, basically.

I reckon if you're looking for a job right now, go and look at your professional communities that are doing because lots and lots of people are doing these live stuff now, particularly on LinkedIn, because people have got time. And there are lots of community bubbles that have been formed around a particular area of interest; and I've certainly seen that happen from our audience in our show as well. And in fact, we had a guest and somebody who commented, who was teaching architects how to speak more clearly, and communicate in English. I invited her to our show, and then she found clients in Thailand from our show.
So that whole kind of interaction, put your hand up, communicate with other people, it's a great way to start a networking relationship, and that's what we've seen from doing the daily LinkedIn lives.

Jeff
The more visible you are, folks the more people will get to see you as an expert. "Oh, I am not an expert". Yeah, you are more than you give yourself credit for. And if you're not as big an expert as others, well, you're still an expert at what you do. And it's a big world, it's a big country, someone will be interested in you and your expertise. Result winds up being, if no one knows about you, you're invisible. If people start to see you as the experts, they have certainly with me in my work, as they certainly do with you your work, suddenly; opportunities arrive in your inbox, which is what you want. If you're always the hunter reaching out, it's like being like amongst all the other fish trying to jump on the hook. Now, there's a lot of competition to get on the hook.

Karalyn
Yeah.

Jeff
If people are reaching out to you, which is really what you want, you've cut the line. And I'm just going to use one more metaphor: when you're trying to get into a nightclub, you can go in through the front door where the bouncer is, the back door where someone opens it up for you, or there's a side door. And being visible is like the side door. You're able to get in because you're doing something that no one else is willing to do, and you have the courage to do.

Karalyn
And it's interesting with social media and LinkedIn, and I think these statistics are still relevant; that 10 years ago, I was looking at online research and being done over the almost from the time that the internet started about online communities. And the statistics where 90% of people are lurkers, so they just consume and whatever; 8% of people actually give the thumbs up or like or comment and 2% of people are creators. And so guess who stands out the most in that entire scenario? And I think that still stands it no matter what the community is.

So we've had also just on career care package, we had people that have told how they've really struggled to find a job, but what they've done is that is actually create put themselves at the center of that community, and be the expert in helping other people find jobs and have actually found jobs themselves. And in fact, Jacob who introduced as the job mom, he told that tale about that's how he's done the job mom was it, he was looking for a job himself in Paris. So he started looking about it and creating opportunities for himself. If you look at those numbers you go, "Gosh, you can stand out, if you're just one of the 2%". You might not be the smartest person in the room, but certainly you've got a voice that people actually listening to.

Jeff
Bingo, and that's what everyone should be looking for is the opportunity to be seen, notice, as opposed to lurking in the background, because the lurkers are the ones who have the whole fight to get on to the hook. Whereas by cutting the line....

Karalyn
Yeah.

Jeff
And this is my favorite line cutting story: my wife and I adopted our son, from Kazakhstan. And when we left Kazakhstan with him, we had to fly out by way of Moscow. And in Moscow, when you go through customs, there are thousands of people waiting to get through the official, but parents with very young children can walk to the front of any line. It's a custom. And as we arrived, there were people waving us to the front, because we clearly look like Americans, we dressed differently. And it was clear, we didn't speak the language, we look kind of puzzled, but we were being told go to the front of the line and we did, and we didn't have to wait behind 300 people. And that's what you're looking for folks; you are looking for the opportunity to get to the front of the line all the time. And what Karalyn is talking about, is some simple ways to network, get yourself to the front of the line, be advantage, so you get the results that you want fast, as opposed to taking so long.

Karalyn
And it makes it more fun, you write a blog post, or you appear on a podcast, or you have a chat with somebody on LinkedIn live or whatever. like it doesn't, it takes it seriously. It's just, it can be having a great conversation with a couple of friends and other people watching or reading. And it makes it more fun than having to be like the cold calling salesman.

Jeff
And, folks, I'll just simply say I'm sure some of you guessed that the idea of appearing on a podcast, or a YouTube video, it's really no big deal. It's really very easy. And you just find someone who hosts a show that relates to what it is that you have some degree of expertise in, you let them know you're available as a guest. And I'm sure you'll concur with this, if the person has some knowledge and can string some sentences together, "Hey, I'm happy to have you on". Right?

Karalyn
38:25 [Inaudible] a little tip around that too, Jeff is that you want to look at people like one38:29 [inaudible] daily. So the biggest one of the biggest headaches is finding guests; and I've been really fortunate because 38:35 [Inaudible] taken on a lot of that into him. He loves watching Ted TEDx talks, and reading blog posts, and so forth. So look for somebody that's actually producing a lot of content, because they will be looking for guests a lot of the time. So if somebody that does a podcast, whatever, once a month, he's probably got a bank of podcasts lined up, that people like us who are doing daily stuff, it's one of the big things is to find interesting guests. So make yourself interesting to you know, a podcast or LinkedIn live person and tell them why your audience would be interested in what you've got to say or share or there's an interesting angle around that, then you've got much more chance of actually doing.

Jeff
I agree with you wholeheartedly. Hey, how can people find out more about you and the work that you do? And please spell your name for them, okay?

Karalyn
And so you can look me up on LinkedIn. So my name is spelled k-a-r-a-l-y-n, and my surname is brown, and everybody knows that but without an E. And so you'll be up on LinkedIn. I have a website called interview iq.com.au being in Australia, and if you put the hashtag in on LinkedIn career care package will pop up on LinkedIn and you can watch past shows. Also got a YouTube channel, career care package that you can find us on YouTube, where I'm slowly getting to upload old shows and optimize new shows, so a lot of our shows actually there, so that's probably the easiest way. Plus Twitter. I'm not on Facebook so much, but yeah, that's me.

Jeff
And how do they find you on Twitter?

Karalyn
Interview IQ, is my handle trying to get my words together, yes.

Jeff
And folks, we'll be back soon with more. I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. I hope you enjoy this show. Share it with other people if you did, because it does help discover you for the show. More importantly, it helps the people that you know find it. If you're interested in finding out more about me, if you visit my website, which is the big game hunter.us, you'll find, first of all, the blog has almost 10,000 posts at this point that you can watch, listen to, or read, they'll help you.

And in addition, if you're interested in coaching, you can schedule a time for a free discovery call to schedule time for coaching with me. If you just have a question, I have two ways that I'll answer; first of all, if you are willing to accept the three to five-minute video and return the big game hunter.us forward slash video answer is the way to get that. And the other way is a 15-minute conversation with me is the big game hunter.us forward slash live and be happy to answer your questions.

Connect with me on linkedin at LinkedIn.com/in/TheBigGameHunter. Mention that just saw this. I like knowing I'm helping some folks. And lastly, lastly, I just want to remind you to be great. Take care.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching, job coaching, and interview coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1900 episodes, and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have a quick question for me, you can get it answered with a 3-5 minute video at https://www.wisio.com/TheBigGameHunter. Want to do it live?

If you want to learn how to interview like a pro, order “The Ultimate Job Interview Framework” from udemy.com Jeff NoBSJobSearchAdvice.comhttp://www.TheBigGameHunter.us/interviews  The Kindle and print versions are available on Amazon.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Watch my videos on YouTube at JobSearchTV.com, the Job SearchTV app for FireTV, Roku or a firestick or BingeNetworks.tv for AppleTV and 90 smart tv platforms.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

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