Using a Negotiating Framework to Get What You Want

By Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Most people are clueless about how to #negotiate My guest is Brandon Bramley, The founder of The Salary Negotiator. We discuss his salary negotiation framework and much more related to negotiating.

The Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary for Yourself

Jeff Altman   

Terrific. So, my guest today is Brandon Bramley, who’s the founder of the salary negotiator. Brandon has a background was strategic negotiations from having worked in many procurement and vendor management roles at a few large firms, including Amazon and American Airlines, where he did million-dollar multimillion dollar b2b negotiations, and also recruited and hired many career professionals. He also has more than 10 years of experience, negotiating salaries and currently runs, I love this name, the salary negotiator, where he provides professional job offer and salary negotiation coaching to help individuals navigate a negotiation process confidently and earn higher compensation. Brandon, welcome. Thanks for making time today.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, thank you, Jeff. I’m excited to be here.

 

Jeff Altman   

We’ll see about that by the end of the conversation.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Absolutely.

 

Jeff Altman   

So, there are obviously many different ways to navigate a job over negotiation and we may look at things differently because we come from different backgrounds. But I want to understand the negotiation framework you follow with your firm. So, walk us through this process and maybe along the way, I’ll start with clarifying questions, okay?

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, absolutely. We’re both coaches in this space. So, I’m excited to hear your input as well. But at the salary negotiator, I personally negotiated hundreds of salaries for different clients, with all types of companies, whether it’s Google, Facebook, Amazon, or smaller startups and what we’ve done is we’ve identified essentially a job offer and negotiation framework. So, essentially five key steps that we follow, to make sure that we have a higher probability of success in salary negotiations, that essentially anyone can follow themselves, whether they work with us, or they actually do the negotiation themselves. So, the first step is actually understanding the components of your job offer especially, as you start to look at different companies, you increase your kind of breadth, as well as getting promotions and your skill set. Your compensation is gonna get a little bit more complicated. So, rather than maybe just getting a base salary, now you’re getting a bonus, possibly equity, maybe a sign on bonus, and some other packages that are included, that need to be looked at that way you understand exactly what your monetary take home pay is at the end of the day. So, you know how to negotiate that up. The last thing you want to do, just….

 

Jeff Altman   

I want to interrupt you here for a second. I just want to be clear for the audience. We’re not talking about the part of the negotiation that takes place during the interviewing process because as we both know, on their side, they’re negotiating during the interviews. For Job Hunters, this is the point where they think that they’re negotiating. They’ve received the offer and now we have to fiddle with a little bit. So, do I have that, right?

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, that’s correct because really, there shouldn’t be too much negotiating or sharing salary information, at least for our opinion, in the interview process on the interviewee side. So, really, what I’m talking about now is once you have a job offer in hand, you essentially have the right to accept and start working at that company and the leverage shifts in your favor is where our steps kick in.

 

Jeff Altman   

So, the first thing is understanding the different components of the offer and that is salary bonus, RSUs options, whatever the numbers are, they’re being proposed to you.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, exactly. I mean, that’s the big thing, right, is you want to know how much you’re making at the end of the day. That way, instead of just negotiating one of those components, you can negotiate all of them up at the same time and make sure you’re actually increasing your total compensation. So, once you have a good understanding of that, and a key step that most people miss, is actually completing your due diligence on the job offer and asking the right questions. So, this is a big step in any type of negotiation, and even a salary negotiation where before you start throwing out numbers telling the offers low, it’s actually your chance to show that you’re very interested in the role. But start getting the last questions you might have answered, as well as throw out some strategic questions where you can start to collect some data points, maybe get a few freebies, and start build additional leverage before you actually send over a counter.

 

Jeff Altman   

What sort of questions might someone ask during that period of time that makes sense from your vantage point?

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, think about a lot of offers usually don’t have a signup bonus. So, that’s like your first chance to ask about that and essentially, hey, you know, based off my skill set, as what I’ve seen with other offers and other opportunities, I thought it was odd that there wasn’t a signup bonus, including the offer, do you mind just taking this back to your team to see if you do offer this benefit or maybe the PTO is slow, or maybe the foreign key is not as competitive, start asking targeted questions about that, like, Hey, I know the forum K was a little bit lower than I was expecting with like a 3% match. Is that consistent for all roles? Or, hey, I see we only get two weeks of vacation yet most companies are given four weeks or unlimited now. That way you might not right off the bat actually get them to change their mind, especially with like a 401 K program, they’re probably not going to, but what you’re doing is you’re already setting the stage for the negotiation and building up leverage, because you’re poking at their offered gently showing on how it might not be competitive to other opportunities. So, that when you come in with your financial assets, it’s going to have more breadth and legitimate see, and they’re gonna be more likely to make adjustments.

The Second Easiest Way to Negotiate a Higher Salary

Jeff Altman   

So, with the gentle questioning, and I know we’re still on step one here, and perfectly fine with that. I just want to make sure that everyone’s following with us. So, in the gentle probing, what sort of questions might someone ask? This I heard you talk about seemed a little bit low on this in a little bit. This one hit the mark. But these two other areas seem a little off from what my research says? And could you go back to the team in terms of the sign on this? Could you share the language that you coach people to use in doing the program?

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, absolutely. So, really, the program is designed to gently poke at why their offers not as competitive. So, it’s using verbiage like specifically for the signup bonus, saying, hey, you know, based off what I’ve seen at other companies, as well as based on my skill set, I thought it was relatively odd that there wasn’t a signup bonus, including the offer, do you mind taking this back to your team just to see if they offer this type of benefit. Or if you’re say you’re looking at see the bonus, maybe it’s a target bonus, they save 10%? If it’s a target bonus, there’s probably a percentage that can fluctuate based off personal as well as company performance. So, using a targeted question to say, hey, I noticed that there’s a 10% bonus, but what is the average payout each year? And what have you seen over the last few years? And what is the company on track to do this year? That way you can identify if it’s truthful, or you actually gonna get a 10% bonus? Or is it gonna be 5% or is it gonna be 15%? So, you’re already setting the stage or collecting more information before you kind of get into the next step of the negotiation.

A Cute Salary Negotiation Tip

Jeff Altman   

And one of the things I would love in these situations, because you’re talking about the range of the bonus over a few years, COVID obviously affected a lot of firms performance, and a lot of bonuses during that time and if they owned up to it, I would love their honesty. If they tried to hide it, and just talk about one year, you know, to me they’re trying to bury the lead there. So, again, that’s how I kind of look at things, because I look for the relationship between you and your future boss, and where they’re withholding. I view that as a signal for what might happen once you join.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, exactly. I mean, the last thing you want to do is join with false expectations and expect a huge bonus at the end of the year, you work for a year and a year, and then it ends up being half that. So, it’s always good to understand the offer. Set expectations up front. That way, you’re kind of happy at the end, and you’re able to negotiate it to account for that fact to make sure you hit those goals.

 

Jeff Altman   

Surprises are never good.

 

Brandon Bramley   

No, no expect especially not after you’ve started a job. But the next step is really, after you complete the first one, you understand your total compensation. You do your due diligence in the second step and actually ask some targeted question. bring back some data points. Also hopefully get yourself some quick wins is it’s time to actually research the compensation range in that exact role. So, a big thing about how most companies work is they’re going to have a set base salary as well as total compensation number and it’s going to be on a range So they’re gonna have flexibility. There’ll be a low end, mid end, and a high end. So, a big key role is to go in, identify what that is and research. That way you know how much room might be left to negotiate, and how strong your offer is off the bat, very rarely have I ever actually seen an offer at the top end of the pay range. So, there’s usually always flexibility, but it is a competitor off the gate, you want to make sure you’ve done the research, you know how much more to ask for. Otherwise, throwing out random numbers can be a little bit of aggressive and bringing that old school car salesman negotiation, where you shoot high, they shoot low, and you are going to meet in the middle, rather than taking a database approach to where you’re putting something in front of them that’s reasonable, but also at the top end of their pay range.

 

Jeff Altman   

And notice that phrase, data approach. You know, you don’t want to be hip shooting things, because you may hips shoot too low or too high. You may miss some money by not using real data to understand what the real range can wind up being. Cool.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, exactly, and really, anyone can do this. I mean, there’s a bunch of public facing websites out there whether it’s PayScale, Glassdoor or comparable levels that FYI, but the key is I mean, their public reported. Also, Jeff mentioned, with the craziness that happened in COVID and the crazy bonuses and increases and now dropped in the economy is people might be reported higher ranges, maybe say they have like equity appreciation, or raises compared to what a new hire get. So, it’s always good to look at multiple resources to make sure weaving those out and have an average between the two. So, you have a better picture on what the compensation should be.

 

Jeff Altman   

And to repeat the publicly facing resources. You mentioned Glassdoor pay scale, comparatively, was it a third one? And what was the fourth one?

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, comparatively. Yeah, the fourth one is a good one as well. It’s levels that FYI, it’s more specific to the tech industry and tech-based roles. But they do a good job of breaking out the details. However, all of those charts are prone to personal error. So, if someone misses one of the components doesn’t understand total compensation that can bake into it.

 

Jeff Altman   

Gotcha. Perfect. So, we’re up to number three now. Am I right?

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah. So, we’re at number three. So, really, once you get all those steps, you should be in a great place to send a counteroffer. So, once we’ve done the due diligence, we’ve done the research, we understand the total compensation, this is when it’s actually the negotiation kicks off, and you’re ready to ask the recruiter to take an increase back in pay. So, really, it’s combining all of those points that you found to the research as well as the pay range and sending that back to the recruiter. I typically recommend doing this by email. A lot of people have an interest this what you think Jeff like to go ahead and do it over the phone. But by an email, if you think about it is most people don’t have these negotiations that often. So, by doing it by email, you can control the tone. You’re also emailing back something to the recruiter that they can use internally to fight on your behalf, and you would avoid a lot of the interjections that you might get on the phone that the recruiter is going to use to detour you to negotiate.

The Easiest Way to Buy Time in Your Negotiations

Jeff Altman   

You know, with some people, I recommend phone and the way I’ll pose it to them is have you done many negotiations? Do you have this sense of yourself as becoming anxious during a negotiation? If so, do it by email. If you’re comfortable, do it by phone, and then confirm it by email. So, that in this way, there’s a written record of what’s been discussed what’s been proposed. One of the reasons I encourage those who are able to do it by phone is to hear the sincerity because again, to me, one of the missing pieces to email is they’re just seeing this shotgun at them. They have the momentary freak out of how many things are on that list. They’re asking for 12 items. Oh, I don’t know about that, and you can sense where you’ve overshot. But when you’re on the phone, they can hear your sincerity. You can hear how they’re responding to it and adapt on the fly and again, if that’s not you, if you’re not really attuned to other people, and you’ll be in your own head and not really listening by all means, just do it by email. That’s me.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, absolutely. My purchase usually email, but I do think phones are a great route as long as you feel comfortable with those, because the biggest thing is you call that out, Jeff is these negotiations and topics, they shouldn’t be aggressive, it should almost be in the tone where you’re talking with a friend, that’s helping you feel comfortable with the move to the new role. So, if you can do that by email, because you don’t want to have to throw out any tactics with you, that’s great. But if you feel comfortable, and you want to deliver that in a sincere way on the phone, that works just as well.

 

Jeff Altman   

And you don’t want to have a multi-screen text.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, stay away from a text.

 

Jeff Altman   

You know, someone I’m working with now, was getting an offer today and I was just making sure he was clear about what the firm needed to do to bring him on. So, I want to see his list because I know him well enough to know where he might settle and thus for me to know where he might settle, rather than push for what he wanted would allow me to hold them accountable to what he said he really wanted. So, I received this text from him in Europe, and it was like four screens long. I can just imagine sending this to an employer, and it just doesn’t work.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Not the right approach.

 

Jeff Altman   

So, we’ve covered three so far.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah. So, the fourth one was the counteroffer is actually getting that out the door, giving that into the recruiters hands.

 

Jeff Altman   

And thus, you’ve received the offer, you’ve done your due diligence, you’ve gently probed along the way to understand and to share some of the good stuff, the bad stuff and now we’re at the point of the counteroffer and that you counter proposing to the firm to the recruiter, whomever it is, you’re dealing with what you really want.

 

Brandon Bramley  

Yeah, absolutely because the next step after that is what a lot of people miss, and where most people fall short in the negotiation is actually handling objections. So, most times you send over counter, you’re gonna spend all this time you’re gonna prep for this phone call, and be like, I’m gonna deliver it perfect. It’s gonna come out great and they’re going to accept, but typically, they tell you no, and they say, oh, sorry, we don’t negotiate and there’s a laundry list of reasons they can give you. But typically, those noes are not realistic and the key negotiators and the most successful people in these negotiations know to still gently push back and ensure that they still take their concerns back to the team because if you think about it, I mean, the recruiters job is not only to go ahead and hire an employee, run them through the interview process, but it’s [Inaudible 22:44] them from negotiating. So, they have a few tactics. First one is to tell, you know, to see if they can get you to accept the offer, as is before they go internally to fight on your behalf.

 

Jeff Altman   

And one of the ones I know one of my clients when I did recruiting [Inaudible 22:58] is they made an offer for less than what they already had approved because they knew some people would always want to negotiate. So, they had more money in their hip pocket that make the person feel as though they got something out of them, when in fact, it had been pre-approved at that amount. So, if you settle if you buy into the original offer, from their standpoint, save the firm 15 grand terrific. I’m a hero. But always try. Always shoot for.

What Benefits May Be Negotiable?

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, I think that’s the biggest key here is everyone should negotiate a job offer. I mean, even at the salary negotiator, we have a 94% success rate. So, 94% of the time do companies actually provide better compensation when you negotiate. So, in my opinion, with only a 6% rate of them not negotiating or worst case is you go through the negotiation process you try and they say no and then at least in your mind, you know that at least you try it, you’re not worried later down the road. But like I said, 94% of the time, if you do it correctly, they’re going to provide more compensation because maybe they’re expecting you to negotiate and usually it’s a skill set that they’re seeking in most jobs. There’s a ton of reasons why it might be lower. So, it makes sense to justify take that additional step. Actually, try to get more compensation before you kind of commit your life for the next three to five years to this new company.

7 Things to Never Say After Getting a Low Offer

Jeff Altman   

Agreed. So, you mentioned the objection of now we’re not going to do and we never do it except on Tuesdays in August. It’s snowing. But what are the sorts of objections surface?

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, great. So, it can be anything, right? Anything that sounds like an excuse, or no whether it’s very general as in Hey, we feel we gave you a great offer based off your experience and worth the math compensation for a role. So, we just can’t move or saying hey, you know what, we pay everyone the same in this role, or we’re cash strapped with the current economy. We don’t have flexibility on our own offers, and what a lot of companies put out and say they don’t negotiate. The offer is what it is, it can really be any tactic. But if you notice, it’s sounds more like an excuse, a reason or just a general No, you should actually be over trying to overcome that with the goal to have them take your concerns back to that hurt gene. If you think about it as well is hopefully the recruiter already has something approved that they can negotiate and provide you a better offer but typically, they’re not the decision makers, that’s gonna come down to the recruiting team, the compensation team, or the hiring manager. So, the recruiter almost acts as a gatekeeper. You’re trying to get past the gatekeeper to make sure they take your concerns to the decision makers to see if they’ll provide you with a better offer.

 

Jeff Altman   

And I’m also going to mention the third-party recruiter, not just simply the corporate recruiter. The third-party recruiter has a fee involved and they don’t want to worry about whether or not they’re going to lose all that time and the fee involved. So, often they’ll slap you down to. So, when they start pushing back, you might just simply remember that and say, hey, look, I’m not inclined to say yes, right now, which really gets them scared. So, take it back to your client because I’m going to have you don’t and that puts them in a huge bind. No, don’t do that. Don’t do that because you don’t want them working on your behalf and at that moment, actually, throughout the entire service, they’re working on behalf of their corporate customer and trying to be a friend and your buddy and move you along the conveyor belt to the point where you join later and their money and they try to be very slick throughout this time and particularly a close in time, at the time that you’re getting the offer. They will advocate for their client, that’s really yet. It’s all they can go. Really take it or leave it. Well, I’m going to leave it so once you go back to your client, and saving, get them out the money. This is what I’ll take. This is what the numbers need to be and suddenly they’ll advocate for you because they don’t want to lose the deal. Suddenly, they’ll fight for you, rather than work for their client. Is that what you find in those situations as well?

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, honestly, 100% you’re spot on, because most people just think the negotiation is going to happen with the recruiter or the hiring team. But third party recruiters there, it’s interesting, because what I’ve seen in our experience is that’s usually where sometimes the negotiation will get a little bit more aggressive, because the recruiter almost gets ticked off a little bit, because they now see kind of their feed disappearing because they’re like, oh, shoot, not only you might not accept, but now I gotta go back to this company and they’re gonna think that I didn’t set the right expectations. Now, that you’re negotiating so it might make me look bad. But at the end of the day, it’s their job, and they’re getting paid a very hefty fee to place you with that company. So, it makes sense that you’re doing the due diligence. You’re pressing them with some of those tactics to make sure that they go back fight for you and get you a better offer before you accept.

 

Jeff Altman   

And folks, I’ll just remind you, there’s a point where you may hear from a third-party recruiter saying something to the effect of, I’m having a conversation with him at four o’clock tonight, where I’m gonna be doing the negotiating for you. I just want to make sure that I have the numbers down right for you. They already know the numbers at this point and what they’re trying to do is to see how manageable you are to get to those numbers, or whether they’re going to be in a fight with you with their client. So, don’t fall for the BS.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Yeah, exactly. Usually, that question is to go ahead and find out what your like bottom dollar is. But it’s if you’ve already done your research and who it is, or if you already send out the counter, it’s better to stick what you’ve already shared, don’t negotiate down. Keep it vague and just press them to go back and negotiate your behalf and also just send the counter and kind of set their expectations. Don’t put a ton of tactics in place. That will get you stressed out. But it should be a pretty common negotiation.

 

Jeff Altman   

It really should is the truth. Once you start to recognize that the game is rigged against you that the third-party recruiter at this particular moment in particular is not your friend. What they are is another person at the table trying to hit you over the head like his baby seal and get you to become compliant. Once you understand that, you don’t want it giving away all your power at the negotiating table.

 

Brandon Bramley   

Exactly. It’s very similar to sales, right? Salesman try to become your best friend and they’re using that emotional tie, which is also what recruiters do. Not only does it make it a pleasurable experience, but then you’re going to open up, you’re gonna trust him more, because it’s not a business relationship. Now, it’s more friendly. You’re gonna feel that they’re being more honest, kind of take their word at face value. But at the end of the day, you probably only been recruited or going through the interview process for a little bit. You need to make sure that you kind of void still be nice and genuine, build those relationships, but kind of keep to the facts and the figures and don’t just take everything they say, at face value, because that’s a key goal. So, picture them as a salesman that you need to overcome.

 

Jeff Altman   

Exactly, right. If you want to feel well, I’ll skip that. I was going to be critical of people in particular professions and I’ll just back away from that. Did we cover point number five? I just want to make sure we haven’t missed anything there.

 

Brandon Bramley 

Yeah, really the last point was handling any objections, and actually sending another counteroffer, if you need to say they didn’t hit the first mark, when you sent over the first counteroffer, and they come back with something but it’s lower than what you were expecting. It is okay to send a second counteroffer, and still push back on the data that you found what your goals were. Maybe you’d have another offer that’s competitive, bring that into the loop. But going past that it can sometimes get aggressive. So, usually, we only recommend two counters. But the key steps we recommended, or at least I recommend is understand the components of your job offer first, really don’t kick off the negotiation to have a job offer in hand. The second is complete your due diligence on the job offer by asking questions. Don’t skip that step. Make sure you understand everything about the role, build yourself up some leverage, hopefully get some freebies and then research the compensation range so you know how much to ask for and then the fourth step is sending a counteroffer. So, actually creating that counteroffer getting it out to the recruiter, whether it’s by email, or over the phone and the fifth one is handle objections. Do not take no for an answer. Learn how to overcome those objections, and then send another counteroffer if you need to.

Salary Negotiations. Negotiating the Package.

Jeff Altman 

When I work with people, I believe that negotiation on their side is beginning with the screener in the first interview, where they’re asking you so what you’re looking for and you really don’t have enough information to answer that question. So, I encourage the strategy of defer and deflect and differ and deflect translates into, you know, all I’ve done is read the job description, or I got the briefing from recruiter, and she told me about the job, but I haven’t met my future boss don’t have a real sense of expectations, what the work is going to be like, what the team is like, timeline for getting things done. So, could we circle back to that later, once they have more information, because the job description probably isn’t completely accurate. Most HR people are honest enough to admit maybe if they’re lucky job descriptions, 80% accurate. So, you’re aiming at the wrong target to begin with and they’re trying to tie you into numbers early in the process and that’s their form of negotiating. It’s a heavy hand early and when they try and push you, I encourage people to say, you know, I can give you a number, but I’m not wedded to this. I can come back and change it afterwards and after I meet with everyone and have a clear idea of the role, I may go up. I may also come down a little bit. So, can we just deal with this at a later point once I have the more information?

 

Brandon Bramley 

Yeah, absolutely. I’m glad you said that too because too many times do recruiters ask for salary expectations, and people feel that they have to throw them out. If you think about it, they’re hiring for the role. They know what skill set they need. They also know what budget they have approved. They know exactly how much they pay, you should not have to tell them. Usually, they’re trying to get you to anchor around the number and the risk with that is if you throw out a lower number, you’re stuck to that. It’s gonna be harder to negotiate it up and a lower number you might be coming in at a less competitive pay range and the other risks which a lot of people don’t think about, a lot of people are like, hey, you know what, I’m gonna throw out a big number. That way, I’ll have a very aggressive competitive salary, if I land this job is they might be like, wow, we can afford this person. Maybe we should go into different route and move some of these other candidates for it. So, just like Jeff mentioned, I mean, you should push back on that and say, hey, I’ve just looked at the job description or hey, you know, what I’ve been focusing on interviewing for the role. I haven’t even thought about the compensation yet. So, we can talk about that once I have a chance to review the job offer and the details are included as well as the benefit information or you can go ahead and actually turn the question back on them and say, hey, you know, I don’t like I mentioned, I’ve been focusing on interviewing for this job. I have no idea what the compensation should be. But why don’t you tell me what you have approved for this role and what range you’re thinking about.

 

Jeff Altman   

And that’s true, using the differ and deflect approach once you’ve been finish that say, hey, could you give me an idea of what the range is for the role? And sometimes people, they laugh when I say this, and sometimes that the firm responds with I asked you first! Yes, but I asked you second and what difference does it make? And it’s just, to me, there’s information and everything that goes on in the process, and nonsense questions like this, where they try to tie you down early and they really push hard on the number is a message in that sort of a culture, that being very rules based, that I think is very useful for individuals to recognize, and what might want to look out for in the organization as they start to interview and they consider joining. So, I just want to check what haven’t we covered yet that we really should.

 

Brandon Bramley

Yeah, I would say a few other items, specific to job offer negotiations is it’s a very uncomfortable experience, right? A lot of people haven’t done it before, or they get nervous about it. So, there’s a lot of myths out there throughout but at the salary negotiator, my goal is to make sure that everyone negotiates, and they at least give it a try and they feel comfortable going into these because with the economy right now, people have heard layoffs in the news, they feel they don’t have as much leverage. So, they’re getting scared or maybe it’s their dream job. You know, I’ve been interviewing for a while I need this job, I don’t have another opportunity. I want this. So, I’m just not going to negotiate them and accept as is. But there’s so many myths and reasons that get in your mind to go ahead and kind of make for fear that just aren’t realistic. So, I don’t know if you’ve heard any myths out there for why people don’t negotiate, but I’m happy to share some in hopes that everyone will actually negotiate their job offer.

The Top 10 Salary Negotiation Mistakes

Jeff Altman 

The big one I find is I’m afraid that they’ll take it back or rescind the offer.

 

Brandon Bramley 

That one is ridiculous. Everyone asked that and like how often does this happen and I can tell you, Jeff, I have never had a job offer rescinded while helping clients negotiate. As long as you’re a friendly, kind, confident and professional not being super aggressive, follow a framework, there’s no reason they would pull it. The worst case they could ever say is no. But you should also make sure that’s a real no, not just an objection. But why would they pull an offer after the interview you for what, a couple of weeks, a couple months, and they had the hiring manager as well as the rest of the hiring team pointing at the recruiter and saying, hey, you better make sure this person starts and get them in this seat and so that work can get done, instead of like, oh, you know, they need a little bit more money. Let’s go find another candidate. Let’s start the month process or two-month process over again.

 

Jeff Altman 

Gotcha. What are the myths do you find people buy into?

 

Brandon Bramley 

Yeah, I think a lot of people just don’t think they have leverage to negotiate. A lot of people think that they need additional offers to negotiate otherwise, there’s no reason to negotiate. They would never say yes, or the employer would flat out refuse. But in all reality, the way it works in the interview process is throughout the interview, you’re trying to show that you’re the best, the best person for the role. You’re showcasing your skills and essentially, the employer has the leverage, right? You want the job, you need the job, once they give you a job offer. That’s actually when the leverage shifts. They now have gotten everyone signed off and approved to hire you. It’s the recruiters sole job to make sure you start so the leverage in the negotiation actually shifts and now it’s up to you if you accept or not and if you don’t accept that recruiter has to go back, not only tell the hiring team, hey, the person and accept but now they aren’t hitting their goals. They have to go find someone else start those interviews over the hiring manager and hiring team have to have additional interviews. So, there’s an opportunity cost tied with that. So, you actually have leverage because they want you in that role. You have the skill set they need to actually have these conversations and feel confident. As long as you’re doing your research and ask with is within reason, there’s no point not to negotiate and know that you have leverage for these conversations.

 

Jeff Altman 

Agreed. Brandon, this has been fun. How can people find out more about you, those salary negotiator everything. Okay.

 

Brandon Bramley 

Yeah, Jeff. So, this one’s gonna be very easy. It’s the salarynegotiator.com. That’s where you can find out to learn more about us learn more about our services. Also, we offer a free consultation to anyone who’s gotten a job offer or right before they get a job offer. So, we can give them some quick tips and possibly help them through the negotiation, and you can find me on LinkedIn. My name is Brandon Bramley. You can also find our business page on LinkedIn as well, the salary negotiator, and then if you don’t want to work with our team directly, we also have started releasing courses. Our biggest goal is to make sure that everyone can negotiate their salary and they have that framework to do so. So, we have courses on the salarynegotiator.com as well.

 

Jeff Altman 

Super! Brandon, thank you and folks, we’ll be back soon with more. I’m Jeff Altman, the big game hunter. Hope you enjoyed today’s show. If you’re watching on YouTube, share it, leave a comment, click the Like button do something that lets people know it was worthwhile. Also visit my website thebiggamehunter.US. There is a ton on the blog that will help you plus you can find out about my courses, books, and guides, scheduled time for a free discovery call the coaching session. Again, a lot there they’ll help you. Also connect with me on LinkedIn at linkedin.com\In\thebiggamehunter. Mention that you saw the interview. I like knowing I’m helping some folks. Have a terrific day and most importantly, be great. Take care.

10 Tips For Negotiating Salary After Getting The Offer

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. He is hired to provide No BS Career Advice globally. That can involve job search, hiring staff, management, leadership, career transition and advice about resolving workplace issues. Schedule a discovery call at my website, www.TheBigGameHunter.us

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with over 2500 episodes.

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