EP 1967  The hidden job market. Hidden jobs. The importance of the hidden job market. That’s what today’s interview with Tony Talbot is about.

Read Full Transcript

Jeff

So my guest today is Tony Talbert, a director, and executive head-hunter, with minds, let me restate that, mind-set search in the UK. He's been recruiting for more than 20 years and is particularly strong with tackling senior strategically important and hard to fill positions where the pool of potential candidates is teeny, tiny, highly specialized and hard to reach within the professional services feel. His work is in the UK and globally, and he also hosts the career move secrets podcast. Tony, Welcome

Tony
How are you, Jeff.

Jeff
Terrific, thank you, and thanks for making time today.

Tony
It's a pleasure.

Jeff
We talked last week when I spoke on your show about the hidden job market and you shared with me that, although you've been in search for more than 20 years, it's probably been 15 years since you last advertised for a position.

Tony
Yeah. I just don't yeah, I must say during my time. You've obviously been in recruitment longer than I have and we had that interesting conversation about all the changes that you've seen, but certainly during my time in recruitment, which probably started around 1999 those days, yes, we used to advertise. There were certain channels, there was in the UK, you use the Times and The Telegraph, these were the national papers. The job section came out on a Thursday, and all the big-hitting jobs, everything sort of six-figure plus was in there, and that was the means by which you recruited. It was really what we call selection as opposed to search. In that, you would advertise a position you got 100, 200, maybe 300 CVS with a covering letter, some of them on weird paper, and all this sort of stuff. And you sifted through that, and made calls those people and try to work out who's going to be on your shortlist.

Actually, recruitments changed so much since the dawn of the internet, which was just sort of getting gaining pace then on all the job boards, and LinkedIn; and actually differences in the way that your end employer, our clients want, not just the people that are available on the market at any one time for a senior role. They want the very best people that the market has to offer. So actually, it's all about passive candidates as much as it is about active candidates, and the game of recruitment has certainly changed.

Yeah, I've got to say I don't advertise my roles, because I don't think it's a great route to market for me. I find that if I go direct and head hunt people that I find, through my network, through networking, through LinkedIn through other resources, and find people that are a perfect fit that is a better route to market or better solution for my clients, so yeah. The hidden job market is real. I know it's not one of these terms, isn't it that everyone finds annoying what is it? But all it means is you said Jeff is just means that jobs that are not advertised and they do get filled. I'm filling jobs that are not advertised every month, every year, and it's thought to be the biggest part of the market, 80%. So it's a market that you need to be in, in my view, if you're looking for a job today, and that's the trick. How do you get into that market?

Jeff
And it's interesting, you bring this up. There are a couple of things you've already hit upon, they're terrific. First of all, that notion that we were brought in for a search, the client is expecting you to find the best person available, not the best one who happened to respond to an advertisement. And the distinction between the two folks is very profound.
I know when I started in search back when dinosaurs roamed the earth, that's the way I would market myself with the notion that you can run a huge ad in the New York Times was my advertising medium; and that was a Sunday newspaper where you'd have these huge ads in the financial section that would cost 10s of thousands of dollars when that really meant something, and there we get whoever was actively looking. And my thing was always to tell them about we're going to find the best person available, who probably has their head down doing a great job, and they're not really thinking about looking. But we've reached out to them...

Tony
Absolutely!

Jeff
And we've engaged them in this role and they're interested. So that was one thing to hit on right away that I thought was a great takeaway that I didn't want to let go by. The research firm is finding people. They're not just trying to find active individuals, if you happen to be that by accident, so be it.

Now, the other fun thing, folks are of the notion that he mentioned of LinkedIn. As I've said, For years, LinkedIn is everyone's database now.

Tony
Yes, absolutely and the only database that is self-populating, which I think is just great, that's why I love it so much.

Jeff
Agreed. So the hidden job market is unadvertised positions. Now, let's put ourselves in the position of being the job hunter first second, and you're trying to connect with the hidden job market. It needs a certain degree of booming voice in residence. Where do they go find it? It's not like it's advertising itself and say, "Look over here for me", like, how do you get them engaged with you?

Tony
That's the real trick. And of course, LinkedIn allows you to publicize where you're at in your career and your achievements. And I think that's it's certainly for all of us now, that's the first port of call when we're looking for a particular set of skills. So your CV, as I think we were talking about this the other day, Jeff, I believe your CV and your LinkedIn profile are essentially very, very similar. I know, a lot of people will say, Well, if you're selling something, and you're trying to do something outside of the world of job searching, that you might have a different type of profile, and that might be the case, but if you are looking to be found for jobs by head-hunters, then pretty much you want your CV. And your LinkedIn profile to match and to be very, very similar, so that the keywords, whatever they may be, for your industries, for your roles for the things, the skills that you have, are all there on your profile, your profile is complete and full. And if it is, then people like me will find you and the hidden job market will start to come to you if you're in that mind-set.

Another way of doing it is to find recruiters in your niche. So if you're an oil and gas guy, and you do a search on LinkedIn, you be the reverse head-hunter if you like. You look at maybe recruiters or head-hunters as a title, in oil and gas, maybe with some very specifics in there, maybe its location in there, and a bunch of people will come up, and you connect to those people and reach out to them. And what you will find is that they have a whole heap of jobs that they are dealing with that are not on their website for various different reasons. The reasons being, often, these jobs are highly sensitive, there's an incumbent in there that maybe needs to leave before this role becomes super real. It could be that they are looking at a different part of the market where they're about to win a piece of work, and they don't want everyone in the world to know that. Maybe it's just because they actually think that advertising rolls as I do, doesn't really get you anywhere. It just gets you lots and lots of interested people, sometimes as many as several thousand who all think they're right for the role, but they're not; because they're not close enough, because too many....

Here's my other thing, here's my big book bet search, click and apply online, has made it too easy for people to apply for jobs. We've all got into this mind-set that there's this abundance of jobs out there, and there are, but of course, as you and I know, Jeff, you know, the same job is advertised 10 times by 10 different people, it's cut and paste by different recruiters, some of whom aren't even talking to the end employer. So you get this fantasy that there are all these amazing jobs out there. The truth is, not many of those jobs are really real. There's a lot of fake stuff out there, people just cutting and pasting stuff to hit a daily target of how many jobs they've advertised, and even just making jobs up so that they can gain interesting candidates. So it's a bit of an odd area now I think the sort of online advertising game.

Every job attracts about 250 CVS on average, but only say 2% of the people that apply a call forward for an interview. And the reason is, that's not the only thing that's happening in the recruitment piece. Behind the scenes, much more interesting things are happening, like search. I like referrals in companies, I mean, that's 40% of the market right there. 40% of jobs are filled through referrals by people within a business saying, "Hey, I know a guy that could do this job", and then there's recruiters and all the other things. So actually, just applying to lots and lots of jobs and thinking I'm being busy. There tends to be a real lag on advertised positions it's other things more important things are happening all the way along.

Jeff
And I'm going to pause for a second and point out to everyone that what you've also said is something about the importance of networking, proactively. Identifying firms that you want to be associated with and developing relationships within those organizations, so that people proactively know like, trust, and respect you and can feel comfortable referring you to that organization, should something appropriate develop. Too often Job Hunters, lurch in their networking, only coincidental with their job search; and thus, they're fearful of seeming like one of those people. Those people who are only there to take, take, take, because that's the way they look and it's what they're doing, and they're right to be concerned about that. But what I've heard just talked about here is the notion of proactively developing relationships in organizations that you'd like to be associated with...

Tony
Yes.

Jeff
No matter where in the world they might be and see what you can do to develop those relationships when you don't need them, and thus, they'll come to you at the right time.

Tony
Yeah, and you mentioned that I mean, you and I are on the same page with a lot of this stuff. You mentioned a Bob Berg, quote there and I agree with him, he says, The golden rule of networking is all things being equal, people will do business with, and refer those people that they know like, and trust". And I think that there are no like interest piece is incredibly important. And that's why people who get referred to a job, they're already ahead of the pack, they've come in through the side door or even the back door. They're not going through the front door, with the thousands of CVS that come in through an ATF system napkin tracking system, that then gets rid of 80% of them because they don't have the right keywords in it. They're not in that group, they've got a person in a senior role within the company saying, vouching for them saying, "I know like and trust this person, and therefore you want to interview them". it's a completely different situation and one that gets you closer to the job more quickly, and more effectively, particularly as you've got an inside track. You've got somebody who's telling you what the job is really about.

Because you look at any job online, I always argue that it's 80%, fluff, you know, bump, job spec, anyone that I read that they just seem to be full of HR, sort of nonsense really about this, that you're that it's all very cut and paste. When you speak to a hiring manager, they have a reason to recruit, there is a story behind every vacancy, but it's the story you need to know. And normally it's, 'this person didn't do that, they weren't capable of doing x, y, and z. I need them to solve this problem. And it's finding out what that problem is, and then presenting yourself as a solution, which is the difference between getting the job or not, or getting the interview or not, and actually then getting the job or not. And you don't get that information from an online app, you get it from somebody you know, in the business, or really good recruiter who understands the brief, properly and that's where you want to get to. As I say, search, click and apply, it's all very good, you are sitting there, it's all very quick, but it's not effective. You need to speak to people. You and I Jeff were dinosaurs at once, talk to people about jobs, and that's how you get ahead, that's how you really do it.

Jeff
It's so funny; I have a course coming out online shortly that I talk about the best question to ask in an interview. So often people are surprised to find out that that job description or that advertisement that they saw, doesn't really reflect the position, and they're shocked. The HR people have laughed with me for years when I've said, 80% of job descriptions are accurate; and the question is, what's the 20% that's inaccurate? And thus, the first thing I teach people to do on an interview is to ask for the interviewer's perception of the role, and what they can do to help. So they can hear the current thinking about the role, which might be a little bit different than what they believe it to be, and thus, once they know what the target is, everything flows from there.

Tony
Yeah, absolutely, and it does change as well. I mean, each person an interviewer interview changes their perception of the role of their recruiting in a way because it becomes about, "Oh this guy had this and he brought this to the party, and this lady, she brought", that what I really like is a hybrid of the two. That's during the day that they've interviewed. It's turned from a bit, a sort of two-dimensional piece of paper to a 3d person that they're trying to find that's perfect for the role. And yet, you are definitely asking great questions and as you say, asking some open questions at the start of an interview when a company's giving you their sort of usual speech about the business. If you can turn that into a conversation about the role and about their expectations, not just now, but in the longer term, then you're going to have a better starting point than anybody else that's in that interview process.

Jeff
And I don't want to let something you said go by without emphasizing it, the roles evolve. From the time the job description is created, from the time that you saw the ad, as they start to talk to people, the thinking about the role evolves, and you never know it. You never know what the changes are in their thinking. And unless you inquire at the beginning of a conversation, you're operating with older information, and thus you're disadvantaged in those circumstances. So always find out more, but we're off the topic of the hidden job bar.

Tony
Oh yes, we've got away.

Jeff
So far, we've talked about the importance of LinkedIn. We've talked about developing relationships with people proactively within an organization to make sure that they know, like, trust, and I add one extra line of a word in there, respect you, and will consider you for something should something materialize, so you're not just simply lurching from each search to build up your network. What else can people do to kind of tap into this market?

Tony
Well, they see interesting; this is something that I've seen throughout my career. Every year, I place maybe two, maybe three people into roles that don't exist. We're not just talking about the hidden job market, but we're probably going a stage further where, in essence, what I do is perhaps present a very interesting person who is in their wheelhouse, somebody who is in their industry, probably works for one of their competitors to some extent, and has a very strong profile, a very, very, very placeable candidate. And I will approach a CEO or somebody in the C suite with this particular person's profile, and lo and behold, they're interested and they want to meet them. And at that point, there's probably not really a role, all they're thinking is, "this person's interesting, I'd like to meet them. If they're on the market, I want to talk to them".

And over the course of a couple of meetings, it becomes evident that they know more than maybe the current company or the current group on a subject or in an area, and they start to form a roll around that person. And I've always found that to be some of the most satisfying pieces of recruitment. And in fact, they’re great for the company because they get somebody who essentially builds a role that they are very, very capable of doing. And the candidate gets their ideal role, in many ways, a role that allows them to really focus on their key strengths. So it can be a massive, massive Win-win. And it's actually a win for me as well, because I, you know, I get to have a really great conversation with a company maybe I'm not currently working with as a client. So yeah, there is definitely that opportunity, and people can do that themselves, by networking, by making themselves available for conversations. It's amazing how what comes out of these conversations and the knowledge that somebody might be available, all of a sudden, things are rejigged and a role is created around you, and that's something that happens regularly. So yeah, take advantage of that because companies react to opportunities, that are what being in business is all about, reacting to opportunities as they come your way.

Jeff
And I'll point out the two dynamics to that folks, one is you can do that yourself if you understand the organization that you're targeting. Number two is, a great search professional will be able to connect the dots between the clients that they serve and you.
And you can suggest to them, who you might be interested in talking with or who understand their clients, and suggest that they might approach one of those firms, on your behalf based upon the relationship. It doesn't guarantee an outcome, quite obviously, but when all said and done, nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Tony
Yeah, I find it, there's a ratio in there something like 20% of the companies that you identify as being a good fit, will be interested because they're in a space where they're interested. It's all about getting to the right person or business or the right decision-maker, with the right approach, and as you say, a good search professional, we'll know how to do that. It is something you can do yourself though if you're armed with the right tools.

I have an online where 19:41 [Inaudible] is just that 19:43 [Inaudible] dot com. I talk to people about accessing the hidden job market and using some of the techniques that we use as head-hunters to get themselves in front of these companies and start that conversation, and then once they're in that situation, whether they're in an interview process, it's then about using all of the experience of the very best candidates to drive that process forward to a nice offer, and an offer that you can negotiate into a role that you're very, very happy with. So it can be done, people are doing it. And I think actually right now, in this weird world of sort of COVID, I think this is happening more and more. Because, yeah companies don't want to advertise roles for various reasons, sometimes they're making redundancies at the same time, and you can't be doing that. So there are lots and lots of these direct conversations happening in my view,

Jeff
I was thinking about the thought leader strategy. How do you become seen as a thought leader in your field? One of the techniques I've suggested to people for years is the idea of being a speaker. Being on the day is presenting and presenting extremely well. You wind up as part of Google searches, people will discover you for having been in that kind of role before, make sure your bio and the other things related to your presentation become keyword-rich, so as the searches are being conducted by search firms, and by others, they were able to locate you for that not just simply your name. Your name doesn't have that value; it's the keywords around the speech, or what the topic is, that's more important here. But being on the day it makes a big difference to people because it separates you from the ordinary.

Tony
Yeah, it's a value piece, isn't it? I always say this about LinkedIn profiles and everything, everybody; we're all making value judgments all the time. We're all very judgy I'm afraid, particularly recruiters, they look at a CV, they make a value judgment, and they look at your LinkedIn profile and make a value judgment. If they think you're a person of interest in a particular sector and known entity, somebody that has a profile, then they value more highly than the next person who doesn't have those speaking engagements or that content on LinkedIn or has been interviewed for that podcast. These are the things that make you more visible but not only more visible, but they also make you more valuable.

And this is a bit; we're going into the sort of world of brands and everything other, but everybody's paid over the odds for something based on your perception of its value. And I think this is also true in the case of people and hiring. There is a perceived value with somebody who has more accreditation or more accolades, or more exposure on social media or more media engagements or whatever. They are the guys who are earning a little bit more and getting more offers than those that don't have all those bells and whistles, so yeah, there's a lot of value to be added in that.

And of course, we've never, today is incredible, because we can all self-publicize, we can all express our expertise in various different ways. And LinkedIn is a great way of doing it, but there's YouTube as all the other channels that you can use as well to sort of say, "Hey, look at me, I know my stuff".

Jeff
And Tony mentioned in passing, appearing on podcasts, there's writing, there speaking is YouTube, the situation where you're presenting in one way or another. Well, the video is going to wind up on YouTube, that's going to be searchable through Google, the same thing with the podcast appearance, on and on, and on. The notion of how do you build23:30 [Inaudible] use a word that many of you don't like to hear a brand for yourself.

Tony
Yeah, personal brand, yeah, I'm afraid, I argue if you're on LinkedIn, you have a personal brand, whether you like it or not. You've already filled out that little bit, you've got, and you just need to invest in it now because your name is associated with your background. It is searchable, as you say, people have a perception of it, they value in one way or another. If you invest in a little bit more than it's going to start to do more for you. So I'm afraid we all have a personal brand, whether again, it's a normal phrase like the sort of hidden job market. Everyone wants to poopoo it, it's not really a thing, but it is, unfortunately, you've got to just embrace it now. That's the modern world.

Jeff
And how else can someone tap into this market? Because we've discussed a lot already with these points. I'm flying past branding 24:25[Inaudible] of course, circle back to. How else can someone be noticed?

Tony
Here's a really good one, okay right, so you're in a particular industry. I like my questions or interviews well. I think one of the questions that you should always ask at the interview would be about the mega trends of the industry. But you could also think about that from the point of view of when you're trying to grow your visibility and have something interesting to say. So every industry has got something coming around the corner. I don't know, looking at aviation right now. You know, the big elephant in the room would be, what's going to happen with business class flights or whatever it might be. You often find that graduates who are doing their dissertation will do these interesting topics about future gazing. But we can all write something, we've all got knowledge, and we can all research using the internet. To be an expert in any given field, you just need to know more than the person that's talking to you in a way, know more than the next guy. So I would argue whatever industry you're in, try and get a grip of what's happening next, read about it, get the articles together that are interesting. One way of just appearing to know more is to just recirculate other people's articles, point them out, in much the same way as people do on LinkedIn and say, "Hey, I read this great article, it moved my knowledge forward in this subject, you ought to read it too", that's one way of presenting yourself.

Another would be the old fashioned essay off, you know, like, we all did it university or whatever, where you essentially do the sum total of other people's knowledge. You package it up into an argument that you then form and ask a question thereafter, which is another great way on LinkedIn, or other places to say, "Hey, I know lots about this", but you're really showing the knowledge that's already out there, but then you're asking other people to comment. What you'll get is people engaging with you who are interested in that next thing. And it's always, most senior business leaders, they are paid to think about what happens next, not just what's happening now. So they're the people you get on the radar of really, really quickly if you future gaze, if you say what's happening in the industry next. And I've maybe not got all the solutions or all the answers, but I know what the problems are, and I know what people are proposing. There's a great way.

Jeff
And thus, you're the curators of information.

Tony
We can all be curators, absolutely. And doing that well makes you look like somebody that other people want to know and perhaps employ.

Jeff
And it's something that if you speak to a group or you appear on a podcast, one of the things you can do is take the file, have it transcribed by someone on Fiverr and then do an edit job and turn it into a short book.

Tony
Yeah, absolutely 27:16 [cross talking]. Yeah, absolutely, I think there's plenty of scope for saying, "Look, I'm interested". People want to hire people who are interested in the industry that they're in. They want to know that you have industry knowledge, that you understand what's happening now, what's happening next. These are some of the things that I think really play out in the interview, but also in the interview process; and the recruitment process beforehand, does this person look like they're committed to the industry sector, and they know what's going on? It's just a basic that you want people to have, but if they then go beyond that, and they look like a bit of a trailblazer in the industry, wow, your value has just gone up massively. So you're capable of maybe, you know, jumping a grade or two by being, the sort of pseudo expert in what's happening next. It's a brilliant thing to do, it's not that hard. It's a bit like being in a university and writing a piece on an essay on a topic that you don't understand. You research it, you become more of a knowledgeable person than the next guy, you ask the right questions, you post or write stuff, and you share quotes from people who know more than you and perhaps ask some questions. It's a tried and tested method. It does work.

Jeff
Yes, it does. I know friends of mine have done this for years, and going back in time, pre internet days, 28:39 [cross talking] I knew who would share little articles. This is pre internet. So she would make Xerox copies and mail them to people, things that she thought might be interesting, might be interested in the article, might benefit in some way this got on your radar. She was a very early commodities broker; and for women, she was the first one in her class at a major firm. And when all is said and done, that's how she rounded up many wealthy investors as our clients, the same thing exists today. How do you get on the radar, is the question?

Tony
It's the information age, isn't it? That's the age range and knowledge is power. If you can curate the information, if you can project the information that's relevant for people, to the relevant groups, joining groups, and starting conversations, it just makes you look more like an expert in your field. And that's what I think, more and more these days, it is about expertise. I guess we're coming full circle back to the hidden job market, and why it is like it is; because we as recruiters are asked to find people that as we said at the start or, experts in an area. People don't want to hire somebody who could transition into a role, they want to hire somebody who hits the ground running, and has the company running faster than it was previously. They want somebody that that moves the dial forward. So that always tends to be somebody who has great knowledge of the sector.

We used to talk a lot about transferable skills, I think they clearly are there at the start of your career; I think they're at the end of your career when you just talk about the size of the company that you run, and all the sort of management piece. But in the mid part of your career, now, it is much more about, are you an expert? Do you know more? Do you add value in that way and understands something that's happening in the industry? It's why going back to why do people not advertise jobs, or why don't they fill jobs that way? It's because what companies want is the readymade product; and when they post an advert they get, 80% of the people that want the ATS discounts are people that are outside of the industry that just think, "This sounds interesting, I'd like to learn more about this job that I don't really know loads about, but I think I'm 70% fit". Companies don't want to send 70% fit, they want to 80,90 95% fit, and that's where we've ended up with the hidden job market being as prevalent as it is.

Jeff
And if you'd like to be the one who's tapping someone on the shoulder, in the course of your search. You don't want to be looking at job boards, to find resumes; you want to be the one who's reaching out. So folks, I'll just point out, you can have your resume out in lots of places, and people like Tony and others, an executive search will never see them. The goal here is how can you be found by him and others like him? How can you proactively reach out to people so that they know, like, trust and respect you. I'm going to hit that theme again. And they believe that you are more expert than someone else. What can you do proactively to do that is a big part of this?

Tony
I think you've got to decide. I talk to people about their job search. If you're open to everything, and we were talking the other day about people who are open to opportunities on LinkedIn, and I think, well, your number one, your headline is your prime real estate. So if that's just saying open to work or open to opportunities, but he's not telling me what opportunities you are open to, it's a bit of a damp squib. You need to narrow down what you want to do, and where you want to do that thing, and then project that out. Because otherwise people will, they'll just pass you over if you're too much of a generalist or open to everything. Nobody can solve that problem for you, you have to solve that first. So you have to establish, what do you want to do in what industry? How can you then get in that industry? And that's a sort of a process of thinking it in reverse if you like. If you then start to project that you want to be in the industry, and link with people who are already in that industry and have those conversations. Build that tight network rather than just a massive general network. And do what you were saying early, Jeff, say, identifying the 20 best companies in that space that you want to speak to. Start following them on LinkedIn, start linking to their people; and reaching out over time, maybe, you know, stalking them a bit on social media. So this is something that I talk about a lot.

Not many social medias user, and not everybody gets traction, if you like, and better still, you comment on people's content, you get on their radar straightaway. So some person in a business that you want to work for, if you constantly like, and comment on their pieces, perhaps even asking questions, you're all of a sudden, more of a known entity to them than everyone else. Because not everyone's getting 500 comments on their latest piece of content, and more likely they're getting five, maybe 10. So you can be one of those 10 people that's having a direct conversation with them. What a great opportunity that is, and it's there for everyone to have that opportunity.

Jeff
Super! Whatever happened, we covered yet that we should?

Tony
In terms of the hidden job market, I think just being aware that, the facts are that you're a long way from getting a job when you make an application. It's fine for people who are at the start of their career, graduates, the first job, there's no other real way of doing that other than networking with people or businesses that you want to work for in the same way. But if you're in any way, senior, I'm saying to you that really your effort shouldn't be the sort of 80-20 rule. If you like that, 20% of your rewards come from, sorry, 80% of your rewards come from 20% of your effort. Actually, your networking wants to be the bit that you spend more time on, maybe your applications online.

I think there's a bit of reverse idea. I think if I was looking for a job today, I wouldn't be sitting around making hundreds of applications by just search clicking applying. I would be making real high quality applications by looking at jobs that I found, and saying, "Am I an 80, 90% fit for that company? And why? What's my why as to why I'm a fit? And then instead of just hitting apply, I would find out who do I know in that business, and I reach out and speak to them. And I'd say, about this interesting role, I noticed who's going to be the hiring manager for that, as far as you know, is that a live position. I'd get the real inside track, I'd see if I could get directly referred to that because the person you know, in that company may well even get a reward for referring you; might get a two or $3,000 reward for doing that, so there's a win-win there. And of course, you're then in the know, like and trust situation where you're already being bashed for. So that that would be something I would do in terms of an application that made more sense than simply hitting apply and watching my CV fly off into the black hole of the internet. Not knowing whether I'm going to get any response whatsoever. And that to me, just, I'd be too out of control, that's no good to me. So spend more time on quality over quantity is what I'm saying.

Jeff
Thank you, Tony, this has been terrific. How can people find out more about you and your work?

Tony
Well, if you go to career move secrets dot com, you'll find that I have a website there that talks about a lot of things I do. In fact, some of the interesting things that are on there, other than my podcast, which of course you've been on Jeff, which was great, which where I interview, senior people who have had great career; lots of CEOs on there, lots of senior recruiters, and even people who have just made great career moves. Most of which it seems, have occurred within the hidden job market as it happens, but there's some great stuff on there.

But there's also some free content, some free master classes. So for instance, if you're looking at your CV resume at the moment, a resume if you're in the US is a more common parlance, isn't it? I show you how to, it's a presentation where I show you how to actually construct your CV. What's the best way is to beat the applicant tracking system when you need to, but also have your CV be written by somebody like me and understood. So I give you the perfect format, and I give you the template, and that's all free, that's great.

And in terms of your job search, I also have a master class on that as well, which explains a lot more about what I've been talking about here in the hidden job market, about how it really works, how recruitment really works, and how you can get yourself into a situation where you're accessing the job market. So there are two free resources that you should absolutely take upon and you'll find them a career move secrets.com.

Jeff
And the third, of course, is the podcast.

Tony
Yeah, the podcast, which I'm enjoying; I think what am I, I'm not like you, Jeff, where I'm up to 2000 episodes, I'm still early days at about 26. They are sort of slightly longer pieces, but they are as I say, I think there are some real gems in those people, genuine people talking about their experiences as hiring managers, CEOs, as international recruiters. And I think there's some incredible information that's coming out of that. So do subscribe to that one if you're interested.

Jeff
Thank you, Tony. And folks, we'll be back soon with more on Jeff Altman, the big game hunter. If you have a question for me about your search, there are two ways that you can get an answer. First of all, you can reach out to me at the big game hunter.us forward slash live and schedule a 15 minutes with me. I think we're charging $50 for it at this point, or the big game hunter.us forward slash video answer; where you pose a question you get a three to five minute video back from me.

At my website, which as you probably have guessed the big game hunter dot us, I've got thousands of posts there to answer your questions about job hunting, hiring more effectively managing and leading, being effective in the workplace. And if you're watching on YouTube, subscribe to the channel. There's a small icon in the lower right or a picture of me in the upper left. You get notified when I release something new oh.

One last thing, if you have a fire TV or fire stick or Roku, download the job search TV app on Apple TV and maybe 90 other smart sets, download binge networks.tv and watch me there. Whichever choice you prefer, go watch there. Have a terrific day, and most importantly, be great. Take care

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching, job coaching, and interview coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Jeff NoBSJobSearchAdvice.comSearch Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1900 episodes, and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have a quick question for me, you can get it answered with a 3-5 minute video at https://www.wisio.com/TheBigGameHunter. Want to do it live?

If you want to learn how to interview like a pro, order “The Ultimate Job Interview Framework” from udemy.com www.TheBigGameHunter.us/interviews The Kindle and print versions are available on Amazon.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Watch my videos on YouTube at JobSearchTV.com, the Job SearchTV app for FireTV, Roku or a firestick or BingeNetworks.tv for AppleTV and 90 smart tv platforms.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show like you did.

 

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nobsjobsearchadviceradio/support

About the author

Leave a Comment, Thought, Opinion. Speak like you're speaking with someone you love.

%d bloggers like this: