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How Do I Get a New Job When My Manager is Giving Bad Reference? | JobSearchTV.com


A job hunter who is learning that references matter asks what s/he can do When his manager is getting a bad reference.

Summary

The question for today is, "How do I get a new job. When my manager is giving up that references about me?"

Before I answer the question, I want you to learn a lesson- -Don't put yourself in that position. You discovered how difficult it is to find work when the best person to evaluate you is not in your corner.  They are not your ally.

Whether the issue is around bad behavior in the office, whether the issue is around poor performance or excessive lateness is, this all comes back to bite you in the butt.  This person is not an ally or willing to lie for you, they are not going to stick to a story.  You are going to need to find someone else to do it for you.  Maybe a former coworker will (the key word in that is former); maybe a former manager -- someone who predates your current manager who can attest to your work.

Let's assume that you were fired for poor performance.  Why would your firm give out a good reference?  After all, they fired you because you did a bad job. Understand that firms will comply with one another about confirming dates of employment.  They're not going to lie about things related to your work with them.

You can go to HR (and I think this would be the smart move) and ask whether the firm has a policy against providing references because, frankly, "Mine will be poor and I don't want to be in a position where I have to sue because the impact of the reference your firm provides is going to keep me from finding work. I don't believe I should be punished for the rest of my life for mistakes I made. I'm sure you don't want to deal with litigation. What I would like to have everyone cautioned about is that it is not company policy to give references out we can confirm dates of employment."  That can get you off the hook.

You still need to get people who will talk about you and say that they are a former colleague, former manager… Stuff along those lines… And talk positively about you.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

The Mechanics of the Job Interview


From before you arrive for your job interview to their first question,

Summary

I want to take you to the mechanics of the in person interview today from before you meet the interviewer to arriving at the building through their asking the 1st question.

60% of getting a job is already accomplished before you set foot in the door in that each of you believes that you have something of the other one wants. From there, 20% is involved with each of you convincing one another to what you been told about the other is true and the remaining 20% is purely subjective criteria. That is, are you the kind of person that can fit into their organization; do they seem like the kind of people and does it seem like the kind of job that is going to be of interest to you. Each of you needs to get an A in the course.

If you drive into the interview, give yourself some extra time to get there. There's nothing worse for you or for them than you arriving there late. Try to target get into the building about 15 minutes early. If you taking the subway or bus, or some other version of public transportation, you can take a dry run before hand. If you can't, do a dry run. Just give yourself adequate time to arrive to the building early.

If for some reason, it is extremely hot or extremely cold, I want you to take the time to warm up your hands if it's cold, or dry your hands of perspiration, dry your forehead or face of any perspiration if it's hot; there is nothing worse than shaking hands with a popsicle at the beginning of the interview or having sweaty palms when you are shaking hands with someone.

By getting there a few minutes early, it also gives you a chance to focus on what your objectives are for the interview. If the role, much as you may believe that you're going to have some great energy walk again with 1 minute to spare you are not could be as well prepared. Give yourself adequate time to get there and give yourself a few moments to prepare some of the points that you want to make again.

Let's assume that you got through security, you've gone upstairs because invariably it is an "upstairs" that you are to be interviewing in and now you're at the reception. Inevitably she will say, "So how can I help you?"

You'll say, "Hi! I have a 2:30 appointment to see someone so." They'll invite you to take a seat and maybe give you an application and you'll sit down. I want you to sit down at a point in the room facing the greatest number of entry points so that you can see someone approaching announce your name. I mentioned that because of something I saw happen years ago where I had an appointment with someone at the bank and there was someone there for an interview. It was a rainy day and they had a raincoat on, an umbrella, they were reading a copy of the New York Times. They had the raincoat folder on their lap, had a briefcase and were engrossed in their reading.

They didn't realize that the person was going to interview them was going to arrive in the reception area from the direction of your immediate right shoulder. Thus, when the person stepped out of the doorway and announce the name, I could see this person be visibly startled, have to pick up the raincoat umbrella briefcase, fold the New York Times, shake hands and they were startled so you knew that this interview wasn't going to start off well.

You have to understand that the 1st 10 minutes of an interview are the most important time because that's where each of you decides whether or not to pay attention during the remaining 30 or 40 minutes you might be talking. So it's important for you to get off to a good start.

Sit facing the greatest number of entry points to the room and thus, when someone comes out to greet you, although you may be reading, you will have adequate time to notice them (again, don't get so engrossed in the reading that you don't notice that someone is coming out to announce your name) and thus be prepared when they announce your name.

As soon as they do, walk over and give them a firm handshake and as soon as you do, immediately size them up as a person and deal with them as you presuppose them to be. Are they smart or not. Are they aggressive or not. What are they like as a personality. Do they seem like a friendly individual? Are they out type person? Are there aggressive person? What kind of individual are they? As I said, deal with them as you presuppose them to be.

Most people make the mistake of thinking that they can feel out the interviewer in the 1st few minutes. If you do that, unfortunately you're going to be paralyzing your personality while you feel out the interviewer. The mistake here, as I said, each of you decides within the 1st 10 minutes whether or not to pay attention to the remainder of the time. By hiding your personality, there is nothing for them to like. You want them to like you as a person.

As I mentioned earlier, the hardest part of getting a job is accomplished before you arrived. They are going to be making a snap decision about you just as you are going to be making about them. As I said, I want to encourage you to decide what this person is like as soon as you meet them. If the role, if you are in a social situation and you met some of the 1st time, 95% of the time your instincts about that person are going to be right.

Unfortunately, because it's an interview and you think it is important it is about a job in your career you really need or want this job, most people paralyze their personality behind it. I want you to trust your judgment. If the role, if you are at a casino in knew that you would win at craps 95 times out of 100, you wouldn't really worry about the 5% were you lost. If anything, you might get happy and excited. I'm going to encourage you to do the same thing. Size them up as a personality and deal with them as you presuppose them to be.

There going to escort you into an interview area or office; they may sit behind a desk with you on the other side, seated in a chair. Male or female, I want you to sit there comfortably with your arms on the armrests cross your legs in a position that is comfortable for you and before they say anything, before they have a chance to answer your 1st question, when I want to do is say this to them, "Thank you for taking the time to see me today."

If you were referred by a recruiter, you might continue by saying, "I spoke with, Jeff Altman about this role and he gave me a brief description but I want to get your take on the job. Could you tell me about the role as you see it and what I could do to help?"

If you are referred by a friend or you answered and ad, if it is a friend, you mentioned their name. If you saw an ad, you might start by saying, "I remember the position description I saw advertised and it seemed interesting, but I want to get your take on the role. Would you tell me about the position as you see it and what I can do to help?"

The reason I suggest this is very simple. Most of the time, it interview is like a karate match. They ask you a question in your reply. They start by saying, "Tell me about yourself," you do that. They going to more depth and you answer. Eventually, they get to the point where they ask whether you have any questions for them. You say, "Tell me about the job." They do that. You say, "It sounds great." And they tell you, "Terrific. We'll get back to you."

By asking the question at the beginning, you are getting information about the job at the beginning of the interview where you can use it to your advantage. I say use it because I want you to answer questions based upon what they tell you. I don't want to just talk about what you've done; I want to talk about what you've done in the context of what they are looking for.

Instead of droning on and on about things they don't care about, I want you to focus in like a laser on the points that matter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Developing A Brand For Your Career and Your Job Search (VIDEO)

FROM THE ARCHIVES
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter identifies the importance of your brand in your job search and why you should work on one now.

Summary

You may have heard of the term, "branding," in the context of job hunting, maybe even start doing some work on branding--Creating a profile for yourself on LinkedIn, developing a reputation for yourself in your profession . . . That's all fine and good but if you 1st learning about branding,, congratulations. You are Going to be doing work to help yourself not on this job search but on your next one. That's because the fact is branding is that something that you do overnight And suddenly people go, "oh! That's Lady Gaga in front of us!"

Lady Gaga and other roots like her spent years becoming Lady Gaga. They worked on creating an image for themselves. The just pop out and suddenly become rock stars.They paid their dues. They did their work.They don't fill up to relationships and their act and eventually became Lady Gaga.

So don't just simply think about this job search but, instead,, think of every job search thereafter.Even while you are doing great work and being happy doing what you're doing where you're doing it,, you are going to be doing things so that people learn about you, find out about you, understand you, trust you and thus want to hire you, rather than that absolute stranger that they know nothing about.

You see, branding is that thing that gives you the edge.. It's the thing that makes people say, "Hey! That's The Big Game Hunter! He knows what he's talking about.." That's how good the brand is..

I don't want you to think about being me or Lady Gaga. I want you to think about what you can do to develop a reputation that people will know, like and trust, not for this job search but for every other one that you're involved with from now on.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work

involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Making More Money | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


FROM THE ARCHIVES (June 2011). PLEASE DISREGARD THE JOBS I MENTION DURING THE PODCAST, I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING AND THE POSITIONS WERE FILLED YEARS AGO.
.
OH! THE EMAIL ADDRESS IS NO LONGER VALID.

Want to learn how to earn $70000+ more over the next 5 years?

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

10 Career Management Mistakes You May Be Making


Here are 10 things you may be doing that hurt yourself.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Missing Ingredients in Most Resumes | Job Search Radio


EP 1 On a typical Monday morning, Jeff Altman the Big Game Hunter will be asked to review more than 300 resumes to find two that might actually fit what his clients are looking for.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.R  

START YOUR 7 DAY FREE TRIAL

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

A Huge Job Search Mistake | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


FROM THE ARCHIVES (2011). PLEASE DISREGARD ANY JOBS MENTIONED. THEY WERE FILLED YEARS AGO PLUS I NO LONGER DO RECRUITING

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and leadership coaching.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

He is the host of “Job Search Radio” and “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” both available through iTunes and Stitcher.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Are you interested in executive job search coaching, leadership coaching or life coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

No B. S. Job Search Advice: Is Your Search Going Nowhere? (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what to do if your job search is going nowhere.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

JobSearchTV.com

What Does It Mean When The Recruiter Isn’t Returning My Calls or Emails? | JobSearchTV.com


If I’m a job applicant and the recruiter I’m working with stops returning my calls and emails, what does that usually mean?

Summary

The question for today is:

If I'm a job applicant in the recruiter. I am working with stops returning my calls and emails, what does that usually mean?  
Well, let me pose a different scenario.  If you are going out with someone and they stop returning your calls, texts and emails, what would that mean?

You know what it means. Who are you kidding?  You just don't like it.

Here is what often happens.  Job hunters have this mistaken notion that recruiters work for them.  They don't.  They work for employers who pay them.  You aren't paying them anything, right? You have to get this notion out of your head that you are working with them.  You aren't working with them. They are trying to fill the positions.  Your background either fits or it doesn't.  When they have something that makes sense, they will be in contact.  

You can drop them a message every once in a while (that doesn't mean daily) to say, "I just wanted to let you know that I'm still available. If something comes up."  

Often, what job hunters do because they are "working with the recruiter" is nag and pester the recruiter. 

Understand you are getting a message in the behavior in much the same way as in a dating scenario, if someone you were going out with stop returning your calls, you will get a message from that that they didn't want to talk with you, right?  

So, you know what it means.  You just have to adjust.

Some people will say you have to work with a lot of recruiters.  I have no idea where you are, geographically, or where you are in your career.  For most people who do not have unique skills or are not at a leadership level, yes, you do have to connect with multiple recruiters.  Recruiters are not pounding on doors to persuade employers to speak with you.  That isn't how the business works.

They are hired by employers and give them requirements for positions that they need to have filled and, if they find the right person, they will be paid for that.  They are not getting on the phone to make 100 phone calls to companies just for you using a call was that they have prearranged so that whenever someone walks in the door they call 100 people every single day.

No. They are filling jobs. They are not "placing people."

Let's assume that you are a relatively inexperienced person, you do need to be contacting multiple people and, more importantly, you do need to be contacting people who graduated from the school that you went to and learn how they got there current job and whether there might be something of their employer that might fit you. You are trying to work with multiple recruiters and responding to ads.  Networking to people that you don't already know and doing informational interviews, networking, going to networking groups, telling everyone that you know repeatedly that you are looking for work…

It's not enough to just simply tell them one time, you have to say it multiple times and the people are reminded that you are looking for job.  After all, when someone has a cold, do referred your doctor to them?  Probably not.  People need constant reminders to refer you to things that they care about.

Back your original question.  It probably means that they don't have anything for you right now and leave them alone.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

JobSearchTV.com

How Do I Get a Recruiter to Respond to A Salary Negotiation? | JobSearchTV.com


There has been no response to emails or instant messaging. I don’t want to bother my boss. Why aren’t they getting back to me?

Summary

I was asked, "How do I get a recruiter to respond to a salary negotiation?"

The person has been an intern and they have made an offer to them.  The recruiter for this firm hasn't been responding to emails or instant messaging and the intern is frustrated.  They want to find out how they can reach this person for negotiating.

Here are a few points:

As an intern who is converting to full-time staff, you are small fish on their plate.  I have other, more important fish to fry, too.  HR has a lot of things on their plate; they have hiring managers who are demanding service; they are interviewing; they are trying to fill positions; they are writing a heads… There are many things that HR is doing… You are not a big concern for them.
This HR person may be out of the office.  They may be traveling. They may be doing campus recruiting, hence why they may not be responding to you.
You are right not to trouble your boss.  This is not a major priority.  If the rule, they offered you a job  and you have already done parts of this job before.  They will probably be asking themselves, "What's the big deal?  You knew what the price point was we brought you want for this internship?"
They just don't care.  There's no point or concern that they have, because, after all, it's not like you're the only intern on the planet or qualified to do this job.  There are others. Their desire to negotiate is really small.
Let me summarize for you where you stand.

On the one side there is a rock. On the other side, there is a hard place.  You are somewhere between the two.

If your goal is to just make the connection and they are not respond, send an email to HR with the subject line, "Are you okay?"  The message may read something along the lines of, "I have emailed and I am do you and had not received a response.  I have a few questions about the job offer.  Would you give me a call, please?  I just want to make sure you are okay?  My experience of you is that you would normally get back to me but since I haven't heard, I just want to make sure that you are all right."

That will usually "guilt them" into surfacing.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”