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Job Search Lessons from the Broadway Show “Cats”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter invokes a memory of the Broadway show, “Cats” to remind you of making your answers to interview questions seem fresh.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you about one of the mistakes the job hunters make way too often. It is the me a mistake but very experienced job hunters make. It’s the mistake of letting their interviewing get stale.

What often happens is that the job hunter has been on so many interviews and they were asked the same questions repeatedly.

Why are you looking for a job?
Tell me about yourself?
Do you have any questions for us?

Even if you’re in the area with very specialized skills, the question start to get very predictable. The result is that people start to get bored with the interview and get stale.

Understand that from the employer’s perspective, they are only hearing your answer for the first time even if you answered the same question for others 20 times.

Someone remind you of something that I learned many years ago. I used to live in New York. Do you remember the play, “Cats?” The one with the song, “Memories?”

I thought about it one day that in this long-running show (a, yes, the cast changed many times over the years) and that normally cast members and apart for at least a year or so. This performer is saying the same lines, seeing the same songs, night after night. They are performing six days a week, eight shows a week. Their commitment is to make it seem as fresh as it was on opening night. After all, the audience may only be watching the show for the first time and they are paying full price.

You can’t imagine that the actors and actresses have gotten bored by now is saying the same things and singing the same songs over and over and over again.

Remember, your job is to be like performer in a Broadway show on opening night, delivering your lines like it is on opening night, making each performance seem fresh, just like this performer stating, “Cats” so that the audience can see you in your magnificence and applaud ferociously at the end of the performance.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. JOIN NOW BEFORE THE PRICE INCREASE ON SEPTEMBER 5TH

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You Don’t Need to Spend So Much Time Job Hunting

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out what seems obvious — job hunters think they spend more time than they actually do in their job search and tells you how to solve this problem.

Summary

One thing I know about job hunters is that you think you do more than you actually do. You think you spend all day looking for work when in fact you spend most of the day blowing it off.

I want to help you. I want to help you see how much time you actually spend job hunting on any given day. This is going to be true if you're working full time and doing this during the evening. It's a very simple philosophy and one that will help you discover how much effort you are actually expanding versus how much time you spend thinking about job hunting.

What I want to do is keep a log daily in your phone, write it in a notebook on a spreadsheet, I don't care.! I just want you to record your activity every day to support your job search.

It can be very simple. Looked at Indeed. 8:45 AM to 8:57 AM.

Called so-and-so. Left message about networking.

Did research into organizations the to the kind of work I am interested in.

Whatever it is you write it down and the amount of time you spent doing it.

Give yourself two weeks. Review it. See what you've actually done and how much time you've really spent job hunting.

This will probably lead you to an aha moment where you realize that perhaps you spend an hour a day doing work related to job search. Maybe it was two hours.

It will beg the question, "what did you do the rest of the time?"

Now if you can get that an hour up to two, if you can get that to up to three, this will be a lot of progress for you folks.

The only way for a lot of you folks to learn how little you did is to keep this kind of a log, tracking the effort that you actually spend, and staring at it and been faced with the data.

Then you will realize, "Gee, I'm not really doing that much. I'm really wasting a lot of time with nonsense."

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Forgotten People to Network With

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter talks about some of the people many forget to network with When job hunting.

Summary

This podcast is about some of the forgotten people to network with. People who know you, want to help you but, so often, people forget to network with and ask for advice.

The first category of people that individuals often forget about our former bosses or managers. You know, those people who watch to day in and day out performing your job. These are folks who are senior to you and connected to different folks than you. Perhaps, there networking expertise is something you should model yourself after.

Many of them have joint professional organizations and gotten involved. Many of them continue to have lunch with, dinner with, talk with former subordinates, former managers of theirs. They don't do it to change jobs all the time but to stay in touch in case they need them.

This is something to model yourself after and a person you should reach out to.

The second category of people that individuals tend to forget about are clergy people. No matter what your religious group, the clergy have connections with (excuse me if I use the wrong term to describe how they might be referred to in your faith) their congregation, their attendees, their participants. They might know some of the professional needs.

To be clear, you're not going to go to your religious leader and say, "I need a job. Can you help me? Please. Please. Please."

But you can say, "in case you don't know this, I'm in a situation room looking for work. You might hear something that makes sense for me and, if you do, please point that congregant to me."

Another thing, whether it is your former manager or religious leader, you might simply ask whether they have any advice for you. Now the nature of the devices would be different from person to person and whether this is a religious person or a business person. The advice may be incredibly worthwhile.

You may think the advice you would get from the religious leader will fit but it may be the most important advice you receive in your job search.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

How to Dress for an Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of appearance on income and offers suggestions about what you can do.

Summary

I was listening to a podcast this morning on Freakonomics radio there was about the impact of appearance on income. I know this and impact of appearance on hiring, too.

The show started off by talking about earnings of NFL quarterbacks (for those of you outside of the US, they are referring to American professional football). It is clear from the show that the income of the NFL quarterback who look better than the average was much higher than the income of the average or, shall we say, less attractive quarterback. There is one exception of a relatively junior quarterback who, because of the pay structure in the NFL, is unable to earn market value as of yet.

How does this relate to interviewing?

In the society at large there is a bias toward better looking people. Before you men think you have it better than when, you are absolutely wrong. Statistically, the bias is more profound with men than with women.

With women, the show reports, that they are more aware of the impact of their appearance on everything that they do. Thus, they are very focused on that. In the statistics for men, those who were less handsome or "didn't look as well," earned 8% less then better looking people. There was one exception (one that I consider it humorous one) and that was with thugs where being downright ugly was a professional advantage for them.

For most of us, however, being average looking has a financial impact upon us. Now to be clear, I'm not suggesting that all of us go out and get plastic surgery.

However, particularly from then, who habitually undervalue this, it is important to present yourself extremely well. It is about your wardrobe, your grooming, and everything else that peripherally relates to your presentation and not your competence.

Unfortunately too few people do enough about this.

Now, to be clear I am not suggesting that you go out and buy a $10,000 suit unless you can afford it. I'm not suggesting that you get plastic surgery. There are grooming things and, I know women are going to laugh as they listen to this, that you can no longer be oblivious to.

You know the shined shoes, the dirty fingernails, the ear and nose hairs, your wardrobe, of course .... There are a whole host of things that take people away from paying attention to what is really important (whether you can helps them or not).

As one of my guests on Job Search Radio said, there are people who are very well dressed for the 1990s.. You need to update your wardrobe to look proper for the times.

When all is said and done, if you can afford to forget about 8% of your income, by all means ignore these suggestions. However, over the course of your career, that's a very expensive decision you've made. After all, this translates into several hundred thousand dollars . . . Unless of course you're independently wealthy and can afford to forget about all that money.

So do the things to take care of your grooming and appearance. Take care of yourself. Try to keep your weight down, especially if you're out of work. Stay out of the refrigerator. Don't do things that are going to put pounds on you and cause your wardrobe to look poorly on you. You don't want to wear clothing that doesn't fit properly on you do you? You don't want people to look at you and think you are grotesque.

 

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You’re Kidding Yourself

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out a common misconception people have when they think about recruiters.

Summary

Recruiters. Very charged topic. When I look around at people and their opinion of recruiters, they are universally criticized, complained about and thought poorly of.

Part of it stems from the fact that you have a misconception about who the recruiter works for. Most people think that recruiters work for them; it doesn't work that way.

If the will, how much you paying for that service? And you think you're working for you?

The fact of the matter is that recruiters are hired by organizations to fill jobs. If you fit the requirement do you think you're going to get on the phone and call companies and say, "hi! I've got this great candidate! You've really got to talk with them! They are terrific! Best person I've ever spoken with! Sorry, you don't need someone like that?"

And may call after call on your behalf trying to market you the companies.

It doesn't work that way. Recruiters work with organization that defined a need for a person with a certain kind of background and go out and find. They are paid for that service. To do that they need to find someone like you.

I say like you because it may not be you. It may involve someone with a different set of skills. Even if you have the same skills as the firm is looking for, do you think they're only sending in one person? Of course not!

They are going to send it is many is the client will let them submit in order to ensure that they collect the fee. By sending in a lot of people the recruiter is hoping to encourage them to make a choice of one of the candidates.

Why do they do this? Because they want to earn a fee.

They are not relying upon placing you and you don't fit. What they care about is referring someone… Anyone… Will satisfy the client and being hired by, then work 90 calendar days and receive a check from the company.

Recruiters need to look out for themselves because you are not going to pay them anything! This is not social work; this is recruiting. Unless they refer someone who is hired, a contingency third-party recruiter will not be paid.

Why do you think they are any different than you in looking out for their own interests? Respectfully, when you think the recruiter is working for you you are deluding yourself.

Yes, to earn their fee, they have to find someone who fits the role the client to specified and will work there successfully for 90 calendar days.

Why do you think this person is any different than you in looking out for their interest?

At the end of the day if it is not you, they are hoping that it is someone else that they are representing. That way, they will make a substantial chunk of money.

So don't kid yourself and think that recruiters are working for you. As many of you know they aren't and that's a fact

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

6 Second Job Search Tips: Jobs


A six second video about the true nature of jobs.

 

Summary

Don’t let them fool you.  It isn’t a permanent position. It is a full-time job.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Getting More LinkedIn Connections


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2017/08/30/getting-more-linkedin-connections/

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers simple ways to get more LinkedIn connections.

Summary

One of the bashful places that people have is not doing enough to promote your LinkedIn identity.

You send out emails to people, right? Why don't you have a link to your profile, there? It can say something as simple as, "Connect with me on LinkedIn." In bed the link in your signature.

You have a business card? Don't have one? Why not? If you have a business card, but your LinkedIn profile there. It becomes another way that people can find you. Connect with me on LinkedIn have a bit.ly link next to it with how to find you. You could also have a QR code that allows people to connect with your LinkedIn profile on the back side of your card.

However you do it, just put out your LinkedIn profile, in more places will invite more connections. Even if you if you hand the card out to someone that you meet at a meetup, your LinkedIn profile or to be there So the people know how to find you later on and follow you and connect with you.

Whether you are in, job search mode actively now or you are at your new job, have them include your profile link on your new card. In this way, you're building up more connections, able to create more business for them of course, those connections become the basis of relationship building for many years to come.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching or interview coaching from me? Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us
and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I on function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com

Do you have a question you would like me to answer? Pay $25 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com
and then forward your question to the same address.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”