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How to Ask for the Job – No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to ask for the job at the end of your interview.

Summary

Today, we're going to talk about ending the interview and asking for the job.

Asking for the job is one of those classic pieces of advice that recruiters offer and no one really explains how to ask for the job. You never want to go into that situation by saying, Please give me the job! I need a job!" or anything that could be interpreted in that way; instead asking for the job is really a euphemism for expressing interest. So, I don't think it's appropriate at the end of the interview to say things like, I would be a perfect for this job. When are you going to hire me?" . . . or words to that effect or anything they could be interpreting that same way. Instead you want to express interest.

So at the very end, when they signal they are wrapping up," I think the smoothest way to end is to say,"I just want you to know how interested I am in this role. Have I answered all your questions? Is there anything else you need to know in order to feel comfortable with me in this role? Is there anything that's left unaddressed that you might want to ask me?" In this way, you have you given them one more cut at asking you questions you also expressed interest.

When they say "no. I think I've gotten everything I need."

"Great! What would the next step be there in the hiring process? When might expect to hear back from you in one way or another?"

"Well, I expect we'll finish first round interviews next week. We'll be back to you right after that."

"As things stand now, how do I rank? Again, I'm very interested."

That's it of very blunt question that requires that they give you a candidate assessment. To me, it's best that you know right then and there, but you don't have to necessarily be that blunt if you're not comfortable with that. You can again say,"Again, I want to be clear, I am very interested in this role and look forward to hearing from you about next steps in the process. If I heard correctly. I know this isn't cast in stone, because sometimes cancellations and reschedules occur but I might expect to hear back from you within the next week.

"Yes."

"Terrific, thank you so much look. I look forward to meeting you again as well as other people on the team."

The idea is to express interest. I happen to like that question about where you rank in the process because I would rather have you get honest feedback than the current BS where they don't respond back right away and getting delays and you are holding out hope unecessarily. Sometimes, people make the mistake of freezing other interviews, waiting for that one thing.

You keep going out there interviewing until you have the offer in hand because otherwise, you can get caught short. You can be misled by someone who doesn't have the courage to be honest with you. And, again, if they say to you, "You did really well. We think very highlyof you," they still not committing themselves to you. At least you're getting good feedback by being told you interviewed well.

There may be reasons why they choose someone else that include in differences in the compensation, personality and fit and a variety of other things.

At least for now, you're getting feedback that you interviewed well. So, to me, the best way to ask for the job is to simply say, "I just want to know how interested I am in this role. What would the next steps be like? When would I expect to hear back? How would I rank amoung the other people you've interviewed so far?

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

How to Respond to a Low Ball Job Offer – No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers  a simple strategy for responding to a job offer lower than what you are looking for.

Summary

Today, we're going to take a salary negotiation scenario out of, "Shark Tank," the ABC series where entrepreneurs come to pitch product ideas to five potential investors. Here is the classic scenario on the show: one offers to purchase more stock for the same money being asked for by the entrepreneur. So, let's say,  an entrepreneur walks in and says, "I want $500,000 for a 5% share of my firm," one of the sharks will counter and propose that they give $500,000 for a 25% share of the firm. In job hunting, a similar scenario occurs when you ask for a particular salary and they offer a lesser amount to you.

You have a number of different ways of responding when you receive a lower offer than what you're looking for. However, before I start describing how you can respond, I want to remind you of the quote from the old movie, "The Godfather." The line from the movie is, "It's business. It isn't personal."Don't respond indignantly to their offer; start by reselling your capabilities to them. After all, for them, it may have been a long job search to find you and they may have forgotten some of your value along the way.

If that doesn't work, the usual advice people get is to say that you want to think about it. However, like on the show, people often want to "think about it" longer than the firm is willing to allow them to do so. The offer was rescinded. In much the same way as on, "Shark Tank," even the request can be met with the offer being withdrawn.

Instead of asking to think about it, you can come back with a counteroffer. Let's say, you are looking for $150,000 and they extended an offer for $140,000. "I think this is a great opportunity in I'm willing to be flexible but I would like you to show some flexibility, as well. I would accept this offer at $147,500." They may respond by telling you they can go that high and counter propose for $142,000 or $144,000 or something else.Whatever it is, you move them up from their original offer. That's the game plan – – to move them up from their original offer by expressing and showing your flexibility to them.

 

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

When Your Current Employer Wants More Than Two Weeks Notice

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to respond when your current manager asks for more than two weeks notice.

Summary

I want to talk with you about those instances when you are giving you notice in your current employer turns around and says, "No! No! No! Not two weeks notice. We need four, six, eight weeks notice two months notice! Two years notice!" Whatever it is, it's more than two weeks.

Here's how you respond to it. I want to understand that the reason you doing this is that if you agreed to their unreasonable request (and it is an unreasonable request), it has an impact on your relationship with your future employer. That's where you are going to be for the next period of your life, not with your former employer.

You just very simply respond by saying, "I understand your concern. I want you to know that I'm very prepared to do over time in order to ensure that this is a smooth transition. I given a commitment to my future employer on a particular date. My commitments are important to me; it's important to them as well and I'm going to be there on that date."

"If you need me to work overtime or participate in the interviewing for my replacement and assist with the hand off , I can take phone calls, not a ridiculous number of phone calls but I can take a phone call or two when my new job and will be happy to answer the new person's questions. However, again, I need to be there on this particular date."

If you work for big or midsized company, you don't have to worry about this, because sometimes we work for a small firm or the owner is very hands-on you, may have to contend with an owner who says, "What! If you feel that way, get out of here now!" And they throw you out of your job now. If that happens, they obviously didn't need you for more than two weeks, right? If you want to start sooner at your next employer you can contact them and say, "The person I was working for decided it would be better if I left now and I would like to join sooner."

"Why did they feel that way?"

"They had an emotional tantrum when I gave them two weeks notice and they asked for four and I said I'm going to keep my commitment."

That reinforces an ethical quality in the mind of the next employer in you.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn 

A Creative Way to Use Facebook for Job Hunting

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses a creative way to use Facebook for job hunting.

Summary

This is a creative tip and I say it’s a creative tip because it is an underutilized one. I know with Google, you are used to seeing advertising around the page and I’m sure you’ve noticed that Facebook does the same thing.

Facebook is remarkably inexpensive and terrific way to promote yourself. For you people in a creative field, why not do a campaign on Facebook. It’s very inexpensive; you can choose the demographics of who the ad is displayed to. You can run campaigns for a few dollars per day and put your impressions in front of people, perhaps link it back to a website or page on Facebook where you can promote yourself and your capabilities.

Creative ideas like this for creative professionals go a long way toward helping you stand out from your competition. Don’t just go for the conventional route. Look for ways that you can reach out to individuals who might be a position to go, “how. That’s a great idea!” Click through to you and then be interested in meeting with you.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

JobSearchTV.com

How Do I Find a Job Without a Resume? | JobSearchTV.com


I was asked this question on Quora and thought to be a good way to encourage you to think creatively.

Summary

The question I was asked was, "How do you find a job without a resume?" I think the answer comes down to two ways.

If you are very inexperienced and looking for a job, let's say, in retail or a job at a fast food restaurant, you don't need a resume. They may ask you to complete an application but the idea of a formal resume is not important.

However, if you are in a professional discipline, how do you find the job without a resume? The answer comes down to, "Why would employer want to talk to you without you following the convention of you submitting your resume?"

I think the answer is clear. They had a particular need and you have the experience they are looking for. How do they know that?

Perhaps they have seen your LinkedIn profile. Perhaps you referred to them by someone who knows your work and is a strong proponent of it. Perhaps they saw you speak at a group were you are the expert on stage, presenting on that situation.

Being the expert in the field changes the rules because, "the rules," are designed for the average individual-- the one who is compliant. There is no reason to bend for them. If you are seen as the expert, you have opportunities that other people don't have.

How do you present yourself as an expert? I gave one example earlier – – you are up on stage at a conference and are presenting.

Here's another. You have written about this subject for years. Books are a business card for a lot of people. After all, when you think about it, what is a book telling us? Is telling us that you have knowledge and expertise on a particular subject that makes you different than other people. Pretty simple.

So if you want to be found, If you want to be sought after, If you want to avoid the resume trap so that when they call you up and say, "Jeff, we would like to talk with you about an opportunity with a client of ours."

"Great. Let's talk!"

"Do you have a resume?"

"No. I don't have resume. You know about my background. You reached out to me, remember? Look, you found me on LinkedIn (or saw me speak or read my book), and time to write a resume. I have a full plate ahead of me."

That's the easiest way to do it.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Stop Hitting Your Head Against the Wall

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks to those who are finding it impossible to find work and offers them a suggestion that will help.

Summary

For some of you, you been hitting your head against the wall in your job search now for what seemed like an eternity. Your getting no results. And by the way, an eternity is not a week. But this can apply to you as well during the time that you are searching. But this is really a tip for the long-term unemployed. For folks who are just hitting their head against the wall. And this could be true of veteran individuals and it's certainly true of people who try to launch – – graduated school – – and just not getting anywhere.

What can you do? What can you do in the face of all this mounting pressure that you're feeling to find work? All the the lack of results that you're getting. What can you do? The answer is create your own job.

Creating your own job can be as simple as, if you're a writer, you start doing freelancing. You market yourself as a freelancer. You blog. You do a variety of different things that help other individuals through your efforts. Through that, you are going to publicize yourself. People will find your the web. You will mobilize yourself to get out and about in completely different ways so that, when all is said and done, people are going to learn about you.

I found with one person I was speaking with yesterday, she wound up with offers based upon her writing and her blogging and a variety of other things that she was doing. The same can happen for you.

You may be a marketing person. You may be a salesperson. You can still teach others to sell and market. You can still write about some of your ideas along these lines. You can pick up freelance work in your local community or around the country… or for that matter around the world.

Do you have to get the highest rate imaginable? No. You just need to work and, through the working, to build relationships and develop the skills and efforts that are going to be very helpful to you. So don't just simply look for big companies to hire you. Don't just simply try and knock on doors of small companies and say things like, " Hi! I am a fast learner. I can learn anything you give me to do." No one cares.

What they care about is can you give the results that helps them based upon what they need. Starting your own firm, creating your own job, starting your own small business, marketing your skills and talent – – I've seen it help so many people land work during this "great recession/depression" everyone referred to it as.

So don't just settle. Promote yourself. Create effort. Pick up freelance work. There are online sites like Upwork, for example, to help you find work. Get out there.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Job Search Lessons from the Broadway Show “Cats”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter invokes a memory of the Broadway show, “Cats” to remind you of making your answers to interview questions seem fresh.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you about one of the mistakes the job hunters make way too often. It is the me a mistake but very experienced job hunters make. It’s the mistake of letting their interviewing get stale.

What often happens is that the job hunter has been on so many interviews and they were asked the same questions repeatedly.

Why are you looking for a job?
Tell me about yourself?
Do you have any questions for us?

Even if you’re in the area with very specialized skills, the question start to get very predictable. The result is that people start to get bored with the interview and get stale.

Understand that from the employer’s perspective, they are only hearing your answer for the first time even if you answered the same question for others 20 times.

Someone remind you of something that I learned many years ago. I used to live in New York. Do you remember the play, “Cats?” The one with the song, “Memories?”

I thought about it one day that in this long-running show (a, yes, the cast changed many times over the years) and that normally cast members and apart for at least a year or so. This performer is saying the same lines, seeing the same songs, night after night. They are performing six days a week, eight shows a week. Their commitment is to make it seem as fresh as it was on opening night. After all, the audience may only be watching the show for the first time and they are paying full price.

You can’t imagine that the actors and actresses have gotten bored by now is saying the same things and singing the same songs over and over and over again.

Remember, your job is to be like performer in a Broadway show on opening night, delivering your lines like it is on opening night, making each performance seem fresh, just like this performer stating, “Cats” so that the audience can see you in your magnificence and applaud ferociously at the end of the performance.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. JOIN NOW BEFORE THE PRICE INCREASE ON SEPTEMBER 5TH

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You Don’t Need to Spend So Much Time Job Hunting

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out what seems obvious — job hunters think they spend more time than they actually do in their job search and tells you how to solve this problem.

Summary

One thing I know about job hunters is that you think you do more than you actually do. You think you spend all day looking for work when in fact you spend most of the day blowing it off.

I want to help you. I want to help you see how much time you actually spend job hunting on any given day. This is going to be true if you're working full time and doing this during the evening. It's a very simple philosophy and one that will help you discover how much effort you are actually expanding versus how much time you spend thinking about job hunting.

What I want to do is keep a log daily in your phone, write it in a notebook on a spreadsheet, I don't care.! I just want you to record your activity every day to support your job search.

It can be very simple. Looked at Indeed. 8:45 AM to 8:57 AM.

Called so-and-so. Left message about networking.

Did research into organizations the to the kind of work I am interested in.

Whatever it is you write it down and the amount of time you spent doing it.

Give yourself two weeks. Review it. See what you've actually done and how much time you've really spent job hunting.

This will probably lead you to an aha moment where you realize that perhaps you spend an hour a day doing work related to job search. Maybe it was two hours.

It will beg the question, "what did you do the rest of the time?"

Now if you can get that an hour up to two, if you can get that to up to three, this will be a lot of progress for you folks.

The only way for a lot of you folks to learn how little you did is to keep this kind of a log, tracking the effort that you actually spend, and staring at it and been faced with the data.

Then you will realize, "Gee, I'm not really doing that much. I'm really wasting a lot of time with nonsense."

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You’re Kidding Yourself

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out a common misconception people have when they think about recruiters.

Summary

Recruiters. Very charged topic. When I look around at people and their opinion of recruiters, they are universally criticized, complained about and thought poorly of.

Part of it stems from the fact that you have a misconception about who the recruiter works for. Most people think that recruiters work for them; it doesn't work that way.

If the will, how much you paying for that service? And you think you're working for you?

The fact of the matter is that recruiters are hired by organizations to fill jobs. If you fit the requirement do you think you're going to get on the phone and call companies and say, "hi! I've got this great candidate! You've really got to talk with them! They are terrific! Best person I've ever spoken with! Sorry, you don't need someone like that?"

And may call after call on your behalf trying to market you the companies.

It doesn't work that way. Recruiters work with organization that defined a need for a person with a certain kind of background and go out and find. They are paid for that service. To do that they need to find someone like you.

I say like you because it may not be you. It may involve someone with a different set of skills. Even if you have the same skills as the firm is looking for, do you think they're only sending in one person? Of course not!

They are going to send it is many is the client will let them submit in order to ensure that they collect the fee. By sending in a lot of people the recruiter is hoping to encourage them to make a choice of one of the candidates.

Why do they do this? Because they want to earn a fee.

They are not relying upon placing you and you don't fit. What they care about is referring someone… Anyone… Will satisfy the client and being hired by, then work 90 calendar days and receive a check from the company.

Recruiters need to look out for themselves because you are not going to pay them anything! This is not social work; this is recruiting. Unless they refer someone who is hired, a contingency third-party recruiter will not be paid.

Why do you think they are any different than you in looking out for their own interests? Respectfully, when you think the recruiter is working for you you are deluding yourself.

Yes, to earn their fee, they have to find someone who fits the role the client to specified and will work there successfully for 90 calendar days.

Why do you think this person is any different than you in looking out for their interest?

At the end of the day if it is not you, they are hoping that it is someone else that they are representing. That way, they will make a substantial chunk of money.

So don't kid yourself and think that recruiters are working for you. As many of you know they aren't and that's a fact

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Who You Work for Matters


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains why it’s important for you to look at the brand of the firm you’re joining when deciding about a job offer.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.
Job hunting is a rigged game with you the patsy.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter