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How Do I Get a Recruiter to Respond to A Salary Negotiation? | JobSearchTV.com


There has been no response to emails or instant messaging. I don’t want to bother my boss. Why aren’t they getting back to me?

Summary

I was asked, "How do I get a recruiter to respond to a salary negotiation?"

The person has been an intern and they have made an offer to them.  The recruiter for this firm hasn't been responding to emails or instant messaging and the intern is frustrated.  They want to find out how they can reach this person for negotiating.

Here are a few points:

As an intern who is converting to full-time staff, you are small fish on their plate.  I have other, more important fish to fry, too.  HR has a lot of things on their plate; they have hiring managers who are demanding service; they are interviewing; they are trying to fill positions; they are writing a heads… There are many things that HR is doing… You are not a big concern for them.
This HR person may be out of the office.  They may be traveling. They may be doing campus recruiting, hence why they may not be responding to you.
You are right not to trouble your boss.  This is not a major priority.  If the rule, they offered you a job  and you have already done parts of this job before.  They will probably be asking themselves, "What's the big deal?  You knew what the price point was we brought you want for this internship?"
They just don't care.  There's no point or concern that they have, because, after all, it's not like you're the only intern on the planet or qualified to do this job.  There are others. Their desire to negotiate is really small.
Let me summarize for you where you stand.

On the one side there is a rock. On the other side, there is a hard place.  You are somewhere between the two.

If your goal is to just make the connection and they are not respond, send an email to HR with the subject line, "Are you okay?"  The message may read something along the lines of, "I have emailed and I am do you and had not received a response.  I have a few questions about the job offer.  Would you give me a call, please?  I just want to make sure you are okay?  My experience of you is that you would normally get back to me but since I haven't heard, I just want to make sure that you are all right."

That will usually "guilt them" into surfacing.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Job Search Lessons from the Presidential Election of 2016


I believe there are lessons that can be learned from the first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Sec. Clinton that you can apply to your job search. Both made mistakes that you can learn from.

Summary

Today, I want to point out another one of those lessons that’s coming from this year’s presidential election. The lesson I want to point out comes from the debate that took place this week with Donald Trump and Sec. Clinton and entering “the deathmatch.” One on one. “Manno a Femmo.” I want to offer a less biased opinion of what I saw and what the media seems to be providing.

Universally they seem to say Trump was awful. When I saw was that in the first 30 or 40 minutes of the debate he matched up well. They obviously disagreed on items and you would expect that. I thought he was accurate and some of his statements on the impact of trade policy and matched up well with her there.

There was a point after the 30 or 40 minute mark where the tide clearly turned. At this juncture, Sec. Clinton’s preparation served her very well. For you as a job hunter, I believe there are lessons that you can learn from both candidates. Critiquing both of them I think there are things that you can take away.

He was not as well prepared as he could have been. Yes, we all read these stories about how he wasn’t going to be doing debate prep and a variety of other things. It’s kind of like going to an interview without preparation and deciding to “wing it.” Presidential debates on job interviews and were seeing the two people in making decisions about them.

Trump didn’t do well he did well in the first part of the interview but in the next hour of time, I thought he did poorly and revealed his lack of preparation. The words didn’t come out well. Even his snarky comments where he whispers into the microphone to disagree with her, he hadn’t done them with an audience before and appeared to be snarky.

I think Clinton made mistakes, too, and the biggest one was that she was smug. She appeared to bask in her own magnificence and missed opportunities to connect with the audience. Yes, she had punches to the ribs and kidneys throughout. Here is one example. Talking about how Trump and his businesses didn’t pay bills to small businesses like her father’s. Her father’s business never did business with Trump. she used it to illustrate that a lot of small business owners who were stiffed by Trump.

She would have a smile on her face that was arrogant, smug and not likable.

To me, that was a missed opportunity. Yes, the intelligence is there but part of what you try to do as a job hunter is connect with the audience, the interviewer, the panel. You can’t sit back and be so cocky that you turn people of.

So, I want to point out that there are lessons we can take from their mistakes that you can apply to job hunting. I’ve done shws about dumb interviewing mistakes that candidates make involving lack of preparation and being so full of yourself that  \\you are sitting there with a big smile on your face, enjoying yourself, instead of focusing on the audience.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Trial By Fire


Facing facts. Facing who you are and the decisions you’ve made . . . incredibly hard.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been coaching people to play their professional and personal games BIG for what seems like 100 years.

For more No BS Coaching Advice and encouragement, visit my website, <a href=”http://www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com” >www.NoBSCoachingAdvice.com

Ready to schedule your first coaching call? 

The Purpose of a Phone Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the purpose of a phone interview from the employer’s perspective and from yours.

 

Summary

SUMMARY

I’m going to discuss it from both sides.

Your site is easy – – your purpose is to get to the face-to-face interview. In almost every case I’ve ever heard of, no one is hired on the basis of a phone interview. There are some exceptions but they are very rare.

The employer’s perspective is, (1) to confirm that what piqued their interest about your background is actually true and that you have relevant experience. So they may have some questions about whether your experiences relevant; there may be some things causing them some concern.

They may also be looking for confirmation. In other words, they may see your background as a great fit and they’re trying to confirm that.

In fact, what they can confirm is a couple of pieces of objective information that may come through subjective questioning. That may sound contradictory, but the questions that they use to evaluate someone involve some degree of subjectivity.

The other thing that they can evaluate is your energy level. Do you have passion, excitement, zeal for what you do? How does that come across in your voice? Do you speak in a slow, methodical, monotone manner that puts people to sleep? Do you demonstrate a degree of enthusiasm and excitement?

Then on your side of it, how do you demonstrate that you have some passion for what you do? How do you demonstrate that they don’t have to worry about you and that you do fit the role?

If the call is coming out of the blue from a corporation, not a third-party recruiter, I want to encourage you to say something like, “I’d like to speak with you. Can we schedule a time later in the day to talk?”

Then you can reference your notes about the job and background check the individual on LinkedIn, and before you jump off, say something like, “before we jump off, would you tell me a little bit about the position please?”

For the call that is actually scheduled, you start the conversation (remember, scheduling can come from a third-party recruiter), “I spoke in the Jeff Altman about the position and he gave me a brief summary, but I want to get your take on the job. Would you tell me about the position and as you see it and what I can do to help?”

That way they’re going to start off by talking about the position as it currently is (remember, jobs often change from the time that the job description was developed and no one ever goes back to modify them. This helps you avoid using obsolete information on your interview).

As a result, when they continue by asking you, “tell me about yourself,” you have the best information possible at the beginning of the conversation so that you can talk about what you’ve done that matters to them and not just simply talk about what you’ve done. You can tailor your answers to make those points.

Remember: the purpose of a phone interview is either to screen you in or screen you out.

They don’t want to waste time with someone who isn’t a fit. They want to confirm that you have the right background or get answers to a few basic questions that gave them hesitancy.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday. Will

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Body Language Won’t Get You Hired

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to NOT overemphasize your body language preparation when you interview.

Summary

I think a lot of job hunters spend way too much time focusing on body language. It's as though if they mirror the body language of the interviewer, that person will just simply turn around and magically hire them! Nothing could be further from the truth.

The fact of the matter is, whether you mirror the body language, mirror the speech of the interviewer, or doing the tricks people think they are learning to manipulate an interviewer, you're not going to get hired.

I can tell you what won't get you hired from body language. And that is if you are in an interview and you make some ridiculous gestures to copy the interviewer, that is to get you hired.

Frankly it's gross.

You can mirror body language to your hearts content but the fact is if you can't answer questions, you won't be hired.

You can sit with your arms folded in front of you and get hired. And I want to encourage it because even the most beginner interviewer looks at that and views you as being shut down, closed off, detached… Nothing complementary about that.

I encourage people to speak with their hands as long as they are not so demonstrative that they are flashing all over the place. If anything, if you speak with your hands, and you use them as emphasis points, never go across the middle of the your chin. Do nothing to cross the facial line.

When all is said and done, what is going to get you hired is whether you can answer questions well and demonstrate enthusiasm, power, passion and self-confidence. That more than anything is going to get you hired.

There are a few little tricks I'll give you:

The first one is that when you shake hands, use a firm handshake but make eye contact with the interviewer. A smile on your face when you shake hands goes a long way toward breaking down the walls between you and the interviewer.

I know culturally with some people, who are raised to be polite, and not make eye contact, this is US-centric advice. Different cultures and different nations have different beliefs.

If you are interviewing in the US, I contact, firm handshake and a smile on your face goes a long way toward starting the interview off well.

Some people believe you should be sitting upright and leaning slightly forward like an obedient schoolchild hoping to be called on in class. I don't encourage that. I prefer that you sit comfortably in his seat with one leg crossed over the other properly (you will know what I mean by that), and confidently answering questions.

From there you can use your hands to confidently emphasize points as you answer questions.From there you can go point by point by point pretty easily. You should try to stay away from your face and eliminate distracting gestures because they stop listening and start watching what you're doing. By not paying attention, they tune you out.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Only Ask for LinkedIn Recommendations from People You Know

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to only ask for recommendations from people you know.

Summary

Have you ever received a message from someone overseas who asks you to recommend them on LinkedIn?

I have and I receive them all the time. For me, it is infuriating and for you, you should be embarrassed.

Do use a recent example, what do I know about your work as a shipping clerk in Pakistan that would cause me to recommend you? Do you think people can figure out pretty quickly that this is a phony recommendation?

I do.

I will not help game the LinkedIn system by giving fake recommendations and it says a lot about you that you have to reach out to someone like me and others to get recommendations from us.

Only asked for LinkedIn recommendations from people you know. They are the ones who could write textured and detailed and nuanced recommendations that will reveal something about you that an employer will care about.

What can I say about this person in Pakistan?

"He's a really good guy!"

Do you think that would be helpful or, do you think someone reading it with think of you and me as being liars?

I know the answer that and so do you.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to jobhunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

The Right Way to Use a Cover Letter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains exactly how you should be using your cover letter as a teaser for your resume.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Have a question you want me to answer? Contact me through PrestoExperts

Should I Ask My Boss For a Reference?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter answers a question from a viewer who wants to know whether he should ask his current boss for a reference given that he has worked for the same firm for 10 years.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Have a question you want me to answer? Contact me through PrestoExperts

Take The Pillow Test to Decide Whether to Change Jobs

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers a simple test for helping you to decide whether to change jobs.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Have a question you want me to answer? Contact me through PrestoExperts

Coping with Job Search Rejection


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to cope with job search rejection and improve.

Summary

If you've been job hunting for any length of time, you've been turned down for a job. Maybe, it was in the no reply to the resume you uploaded to someone's applicant tracking system. Maybe, you went on an interview or two or three with a firm and got turned down. Whatever it was, you've experienced that feeling of rejection and disappointment that often comes with a job hunt.
Now, in this video, I just want to offer you some simple pointers for how to deal with rejection. And, number one is try not to focus on your excitement and your desire for this job because the statistical probability is you are going to get turned down for more jobs than you're going to be accepted for them.So get used to the notion that you're going to get turned down.
Secondly, if you are actually turned down, I would like you to ask the employer or the recruiter what it was that caused you to get turned down or rejected. Now, if it's an applicant tracking, yeah, I hate tracking systems. They are . . . I use a very simple one so that I'm able to screen everything but most applicant tracking systems like Taleo, for example, the one that's used by more corporations than any other . . . Basically, all they are doing is they're screening resumes for keywords in an automated way with no discernment. So, if your resume isn't one that uses keywords in a particular sequence, you're going to get rejected. It's really that simple and, as a result, no one's going to see your resume. No one's going to be able to see that you've actually done the role except expressed it differently.
I really detest them but that's not the purpose of this video. I just want to simply say you're not going to get a response as to why you got turned down by an applicant tracking system.
If you got turned down on an interview, step number one is to ask the employer or the recruiter why it was that you got turned down. Often, you hear the answer to lights too light in what regard. Just follow up with a question and simply say,"You Know, I'm not here to get into an argument with them. You just want to learn from their observations and apply it to future situations." Often, an employer isn't going to tell you. often, a recruiter isn't going to tell you; at least ask the question. Why they won't tell you? These are litigious times and, as a result, if they turn around and say., "your oral communications were horrible. You know, you you were featherweight in this line of work." They're just afraid of getting sued. So, don't expect an answer from them. However, what you can expect to do is to take some time in self-reflection., what could you have done better? How could you've delivered your interview even better than the way you did?
I'm not saying you did a bad job. Often, the reason you're not taken is that someone with more experience comes in and as willing to work for the same amount of money or someone with more equal experiences wants to work for less. It's often that simple. But if there are things that you can learn, ask and, if they're not willing to share them you've got to spend some time learning from this.
Now, here's the most important thing that I can tell you. Just because you failed on this interview doesn't make you into a failure. And, as a result, you need to get right back on the horse and get back out there and start networking and talking to organizations and working on finding your next job and not just simply going, "oh, woe is me! I feel terrible. I'm so disappointed!" I'm being facetious of course, but so often, people go into this great funk from which it takes days to come out of.
I was talking to someone I coach recently who didn't return my calls for a few days and then decided to surface and and he told me that he really expect to get a job he was interviewing for. He didn't so he decided to take a couple days off. Okay, not the way I would suggest. If anything, you go back out there again. You spend some time having focused on what it is you could have done better .If it was in your control or had to do with them. If it was them ,you go, "okay, it wasn't me," and move on. If it was you, you figure it out and you change it. It's that simple.
So, getting turned down for a job doesn't have to be a death sentence for you. All it is is an opportunity to improve your skills to learn more and work harder on finding your next position.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for more than 40 years.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1200 episodes and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Connect with me on LinkedIn. Then message me to schedule an initial complimentary session.

If you have questions for me, call me through the Magnifi app for iOS (video) or PrestoExperts.com (phone)

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedInLike me on Facebook.

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