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Bring Your Tablet

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter suggests bringing your tablet to an interview especially if you are in a creative field.

Summary

I remember when I started in recruiting and would interview people. Eventually, they would get to the part of the interview where they would want to show off something that they had done. The region to their briefcase and pull out this huge binder a material, show me flowchart after flowchart of computer systems they had designed. My eyes would glaze over as they with him through and try to show me things.

Remember these were the days of text and pure text and the occasional chart. It was horrible and I had no interest whatsoever.

Let's fast forward to today. Instead of bringing the book or the huge binders of material to an interview to show off what you've done, if you are in a creative area, if you do work that is somewhat artistic, where the visual is the reason you are being hired, come with the tablet to the interview. Have it set up for a presentation so that all you have to do is enter tablet to the interviewer and be prepared to talk about what they are seeing.

Ending your tablet to someone and have them scan through it their pace about what they are interested in that you been doing and asking questions about his incredibly powerful.

Just remember, you have the opportunity with the presentation to be extremely creative and present things in imaginative ways. Instead of boring people with incredibly boring flat shots (remember you can use hyperlinks to give people an idea of where was implemented).

Come with the tablet to the interview. Hand it to the interviewer. Make sure you take it back at the end, of course!, It doesn't matter what flavor it is of tablet, just make sure that is set up so that as soon as it's opened up he goes directly to the presentation.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Two Tips for When You Have All Day Interviews

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers two important tips for when you have an all day job interview.

Summary

I want to tell you story that relates to having a full day of interviews.

Yesterday, I had someone flown out for a day of interviews with the client. 8 AM to 6 PM was the schedule. He actually finished up at about 7 PM. 11 hours of interviewing and a break for lunch. He was seeing people every 40 minutes. I'll be shocked if his head wasn't spinning by the end of this day.

However, I gave him one piece of advice that he told me was really helpful to him. You know how in job hunting we are told that it's a marathon and not a sprint? That's true in job hunting, but it interviewing, on days when you have a schedule like this, you have to think that you are doing lots of sprints.

Every person, every person you meet with and speak with, you have to try to connect with them and think that you have 40 minutes to create a great impression.

If you're casual about it, if you think you can feel out the other person what they want to hear, you will be mistaken. In the schedule that this person had and the one that you may have if you are scheduled for an all-day interview, you have to go in there "guns blazing."

40 minutes. 45 minutes. You gotta go in there and create a great impression. You you have to size them up as you presuppose them to be and interact with them in that way. Trust your gut.

My advice about asking about the role of the beginning of an interview goes out the window because you cannot asked that 15 times.

Think about it from the perspective of the employer. What is each one of them trying to find out about you? The only question I would suggest asking at the beginning of each conversation, if you don't know, as you shake hands with them or as you're sitting down ask them, "What's your role with the firm?"

This way you know, to use an example from IT, is this someone that you be interacting with from the user community, and IT manager, someone from operations, or any other area. You want to be speaking the right language to them. All that happens is you talking past them and you will lose.

So as you sit down with them, just asked them, "What's your role with your organization?"

So there are two tips on today's podcast: lots of sprints and asking about their role is with the firm.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves life coaching, as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching from me?  Email me at JeffAltman@TheBigGameHunter.us and put the word, “Coaching” in the subject line.

Do you have a quick question you would like me to answer? Pay $50 via PayPal to TheBigGameHunter@gmail.com  

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

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If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Using Stories to Answer Interview Questions

Stories aren’t just for bedtime.

Here, Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the value of stories when you interview and suggest a format for your stories to create the best impression with an interviewer.

Summary

When people put their children to sleep they often tell stories. The stories aren’t designed to engage the child and, of course, to relax them.

As adults, we forget the power of stories and there is no place for powerful to tell stories that a job interview.

There is a format to effective interview stories and you need to be prepared with a number of stories for every interview you take.

The format goes by the acronym of SOAR.

You start off with the situation you have been involved with. What did you step into? Was the problem you were asked to address?

The obstacle you had to contend with? The obstacle you had to overcome to contend with those situations.

What action sdid you take in order to solve that problem? The results that you achieved by doing all of this is the R in SOAR.

Results need to be quantified; you can’t just say everyone lives happily ever after. You can joke about that in the interview (you don’t start off with, “once upon a time”),

You do talk about the situation you were facing, obstacles you faced, actions that you took and results that you got quantified in money saved or money earned for your company wherever possible.

There’s no better way to stand out from the competition by quantifying using metrics because your competition often isn’t using them. When an employer is trying to evaluate what you did, as a recent guest of mine on Job Search Radio said, we’re looking for measurements of results. Whether it’s the size and scope of the project you worked on the results of what you did, numbers create an impact.

So, follow that format of Situations Obstacles, Actions and Results and your interviews will soar.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Handling a Phone Interview From Out of the Blue

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains what you should do when you get a phone call from someone who wants to interview you from out of the blue.

 

Summary

Phone interviews are easier and harder than face to face ones. They are harder because the interviewer will not be influenced by how handsome you are or what a great wardrobe they that you have. All that they have to listen to is your voice. On the other hand, phone interviews are easier than face-to-face ones because they can't see that you have your resume out in front of you, that you have talking points marked off on your resume or that you may have a book open to answers to questions that you tend to flub.

There are two different types of phone interviews that people can yet but today I'm going to focus on the phone interview that comes in and out of the blue. You know, someone found your profile on LinkedIn or your resume on a job board and decides to call you up and do a brief interview with you.

Today, I am going to cover the basic point of how to handle a situation like that. I'm a play the role of the caller.

So they call you up and say, "Steve? I'm Jeff Altman. I'm a recruiter and I saw your resume on a job board or read your LinkedIn profile and would like to talk with you about a job I have the client of mine. Is this a good time to speak?"

"No, Jeff. It isn't a good time. I am about to go into a meeting (I have a call scheduled for five minutes from now). I want to make sure I have time to speak with you. Can we schedule a time to speak?"

"Sure," and you schedule the appointment.

Then, before jumping off the phone, you ask, "would you take a minute and tell me about the role you want to speak with me about?"

Why is this such a great technique? You want to know what the target is then made them want to call you so that you can proactively address this in your conversation with them as opposed to just guessing.

When I speak about guessing, I'm talking about how you just talk about what you've done as opposed to talking about what you've done that matters to them.

The first one is just talking and talking and talking without really knowing what matters to them or what they are looking for. The other, is speaking about what your experiences that will help them with the work they need to have done. Big difference!

By just asking them at the beginning of the conversation, you know what they are looking for and target answers to questions.

After all, when a consultant comes to meet with someone, they don't just simply talk about what they can do for you. They ask a number of questions to understand what your problem is and then focus their discussion on the work that they can do you think can help you with your issue. You want to do the same thing as a job hunter.

 

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Forget the Elevator Pitch

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to “ditch the pitch” and substitute something better instead.

Why?

Have you been ever on the receiving end of an elevator pitch?

I have . . . a lot of elevator pitches.

They are awful.

Here, I explain my thinking.

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Reading the Interviewer’s Body Language

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out some body language clues to look for when you are interviewing. He also points out a way to try to reconnect with the interviewer if you are not connecting.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit http://www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

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