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Do Job Boards Matter? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses whether you should be spending time in your  job search with job boards. 

Summary

Today, I want to talk with you about whether or not you should be applying for jobs using job boards.

There is an article that I saw online that poses the question, whether job boards matter anymore. The article includes data from the corporate perspective using this 1 firm's model. What they say is that people found their job listings, 38% found them through corporate websites, 35% through social media links, 23% through an email campaign, 4% throughout the links. Interesting data if you are trying to hire. Let's break down the data.

They talk about how 61% of social media visits and 95% of social media applications were in the 1st 7 days. In other words, they were able to get out the message a lot quicker using social media. They got more applications more quickly using social media.

Social Media
From the job hunter perspective, social media is a great way to find out about "stuff." It's a great way to find out about jobs and companies….It is a great tool when you are job hunting
.
However, I also want to say the job boards are a terrific tool, too. You can call that job board Monster, CareerBuilder, Dice or whatever! You can call it LinkedIn because that has because LinkedIn certainly advertises jobs in a variety of ways and I'm talking about a job board feature here.

All these job boards are going to be morphing fairly soon and aggregating jobs like Indeed and SimplyHired do.

The relevance to you is that despite all the hype in the recruiting world is around LinkedIn, the fact of the matter is that people are ship finding jobs to job boards. They are finding jobs through networking too much higher level. But, yes, they are finding jobs for job boards.

Yes, it is a tedious process. There are a few things that make it better. For example, I did a quick demo with someone at monster.com for a little utility that they have called BeKnown. That operates on Facebook. Once you register on monster and come over to Facebook to look for jobs, what you will notice is that on some of the jobs a picture starts to appear on someone that you are connected with on Facebook who works for that firm or has worked for the firm.

This is the idea of using your network to finesse your way into an organization, having an advocate supporting you in order to get interviewed. They obviously can't get you hired, but may be able to get in touch with the hiring manager and provide an employee referral that might result from the introduction and earn a commission and, you, an interview and the job.

The Data about Networking is Overwhelming
My advice to you is to use all the tools that are available to you. After all, they all work. As Dave Opton of ExecuNet said on "Job Search Radio," the statistics are very overwhelming, that the way that 70% of people find jobs is through networking. 70% of the 70% find jobs as a result of introductions to people that they didn't know at the beginning of the search.

Catch that one. 70% of the people find jobs through networking. 70% of the 70% (or 49%) found a job as a result of someone that they didn't know at the beginning of the search.

Anything that you can do is going to help you find work. Networking. Job boards. Friends. It all works. Don't drop anything from your arsenal because job boards and recruiters fill a certain number of jobs, even though networking feels far more.

Just keep working the job boards. Keep working. The technology that's available to you to find out about leads (like the agents that will deliver leads from job boards to your inbox). 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The Job Market October 2016 | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

This is my report on the job market for October 2016, as released on November 4, 2016. It is not a political statement. It is simply to report to offer This is my report on the job market for October 2016, as released on November 4, 2016. It is not a political statement. It is simply to report to offer information about the job market in the US.information about the job market in the US.

jobmarket

Summary

Let’s talk about the US jobs report for October, 2016 that was released on November 4th. 

The good news is that there were 161,000 new jobs created and that the headline unemployment rate went down to 4.9% from 5%. Even the U6 rate, which includes people who want to work full-time but are only able to find part-time jobs, declined to 9.5%. Private sector jobs increased by 142,000, of which professional services were 43,000, healthcare was 31,000, government, 19,000. There was a decline in manufacturing jobs of 9000. The labor force participation rate is it 62.4%

Generally, on the surface, it seems like a decent report for the US economy post-2008 . . . Actually, it is a typical one. Now, let me go beneath the surface, because, when you start digging into the report, there are some interesting stuff there that doesn’t get reported on the news that most people watch, listen to or read.

Beneath the Surface

Part-time jobs with the biggest component of the growth. Understand, that government revises its report, even on the fly. Part-time jobs deleted increased by 430,000. Full-time jobs went down by 103,000. When we think of the word, “job,” we think of full-time jobs. When the government uses the word, “job,” it defines it is someone who worked for at least one hour during the course of the month. 

Thus, it seems like what we are doing is creating an “uber economy,” with most of the jobs being created, being part-time positions.

The GDP seems to have grown at its slowest rate in 8 years. 94 million people are not working. There were 238,000 people who had jobs, but couldn’t go to work, because of Hurricane Matthew in the southeast.

Construction jobs increased by 11,000 jobs. Retail slowed down which was surprising, given the holiday season coming up. 

In the last period of time (I think it’s an 8 year period), 1 million new jobs were created that employ women and the government reports that 1 million went to foreign workers. One third of students are unable to make payments on their student loans.

I am mentioning all of this stuff because the rosy picture the government tries to paint isn’t the reality for most of us. People seem to be working 2 or 3 jobs in order to pay their bills or not pay their bills so late. So the Labor Department report becomes a mediocre report when you dig below the surface and adequate one when you stay on the surface.

Ahead

I’ll simply say that for you, as a job hunter, you need to keep your head up and not down. My belief is that we are going to be having a recession, probably next year. It could be the year after. That is because recoveries don’t go on forever. They do eventually come down. According to the government, this recoveries been going on for 8 years which is a long recovery. It is a mediocre one from a jobs and economic perspective but a recovery, nonetheless.

Ask yourself, “How long do you think this will go on?”

My encouragement to you is to make sure that your skills are up to date, that you are doing your networking now and not waiting until the very end where it is too late, you are getting involved, making sure that you are learning what you need to in order to make sure that you are marketable in case, and that you are not just simply focused on your job. You are thinking of herself as the CEO of your own business where you are responsible to the shareholders which are your family and yourself,

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

A Bird in the Hand . . . | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

job-offer

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tells you a cautionary tale to remind you that a bird in the hand is worth more than two in the bush.

 

Summary

I want to tell you a cautionary tale, give you a warning, however you want to think of it they came from her recent experience with the job hunter.  This was a person moving to a new city.  He bought a house with his wife, wanted to move to the new location, contacted me because I have a client there, I had a position he was well-qualified for, all sorts of good stuff. 

The interview with my client and is about to get an offer. The head of the department that he is meeting with his traveling, so. The job offer can’t get signed off on right away.  In the meantime, unbeknownst to me until the last 2nd, he has received an offer from another firm.  I contacted him to let him know that my client is about to extend an offer.  My contact with that firm gets in touch with him to let them know that he’s getting an offer. All they have to do is get one last signature. They expect to have it signed off on imitator to.

Let Me Fast-Forward

The applicant asked me about my client and whether they are reliable.

They took the time to call you to let you know this was going to happen. I don’t know this person to be a liar.  I would say it is going to happen.

I gave him my best judgment.

I also want to say I didn’t know he had another offer until after this.  He emailed me on a Friday evening to say that based upon what you’ve heard from the HR person is going to turn down the offer he has and wait for my client.

The horrible thing that happened is that the head of the department decided not to sign off on the offer.  Now, this person is out of a job and cannot recover that other job offer. He has to find something and he is moved to his new city.  He has no income.

Consider that a lesson.  What you do instead is 1 of several things.  To be clear, I did not ask him to turn down that other offer.

The lesson here is that a bird in the hand is worth 2 in the bush.

The way to handle that situation is:

  1. Accept the offer and set the start date a week further out.  In this way, you can install a weeks time for my client to have come back.  If my client hadn’t, he would have gone off to that original job.  Then, if my client came through, he could have made another decision if you thought that made sense.  Not my choice. His choice.
  2. Stall the acceptance of the original offer and try to wait for my client.  If pressured, ultimately accept, delay the start a little bit… You get the idea.

You don’t turn down offers based upon a hope, awaiting in the prayer.

What you do is turn down offers when you actually have something, not necessarily what in writing, but have the oral offer, when you being told that the offer will be put in writing, etc..  Not before then.  Especially in situations like this where he was going to be stranded without a job at the time working really needed to be positioned.

Again, my advice is a bird in the hand is worth 2 in the bush.  Stall as long as you can. Delay starting as long as you can if that other offer is the preferred job.

If it isn’t the preferred job, it doesn’t matter!  In this case, it was. The money was going to be significantly better.  The work was going to be significantly better.  You get the idea.

You don’t turn down something for the hope that something will come through because, as happened here, sometimes it doesn’t.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you?

 You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

JobSearchTV.com

How Do I Get a Recruiter to Respond to A Salary Negotiation? | JobSearchTV.com


There has been no response to emails or instant messaging. I don’t want to bother my boss. Why aren’t they getting back to me?

Summary

I was asked, "How do I get a recruiter to respond to a salary negotiation?"

The person has been an intern and they have made an offer to them.  The recruiter for this firm hasn't been responding to emails or instant messaging and the intern is frustrated.  They want to find out how they can reach this person for negotiating.

Here are a few points:

As an intern who is converting to full-time staff, you are small fish on their plate.  I have other, more important fish to fry, too.  HR has a lot of things on their plate; they have hiring managers who are demanding service; they are interviewing; they are trying to fill positions; they are writing a heads… There are many things that HR is doing… You are not a big concern for them.
This HR person may be out of the office.  They may be traveling. They may be doing campus recruiting, hence why they may not be responding to you.
You are right not to trouble your boss.  This is not a major priority.  If the rule, they offered you a job  and you have already done parts of this job before.  They will probably be asking themselves, "What's the big deal?  You knew what the price point was we brought you want for this internship?"
They just don't care.  There's no point or concern that they have, because, after all, it's not like you're the only intern on the planet or qualified to do this job.  There are others. Their desire to negotiate is really small.
Let me summarize for you where you stand.

On the one side there is a rock. On the other side, there is a hard place.  You are somewhere between the two.

If your goal is to just make the connection and they are not respond, send an email to HR with the subject line, "Are you okay?"  The message may read something along the lines of, "I have emailed and I am do you and had not received a response.  I have a few questions about the job offer.  Would you give me a call, please?  I just want to make sure you are okay?  My experience of you is that you would normally get back to me but since I haven't heard, I just want to make sure that you are all right."

That will usually "guilt them" into surfacing.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

The First Things to Do If You Are Laid Off | No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses the first two things you need to do if you are laid off.

 

Summary

Let’s talk about that moment in time when you’ve been told that you are going to be laid off.  Maybe, your firm is being acquired.  Maybe businesses just bad.  Whatever the circumstances are, I want you to hear this.

The 1st thing you do is collect names, phone numbers and email addresses from everyone that you can in order to maintain contact in case you need a reference.

You want to make sure that you have the personal information from folks so you can stay in contact with them.  In this way, like I said, if you need a reference, they are available to you.

The next thing you wind up doing is you sit there with your wife, husband, partner, or just yourself. If you live alone and figure out what expenses you can cut back on.  I really mean this.  Working to save money?

Get out your credit card bills. In natural electric bills. Your water bills… All sorts of bills that you have and start to examine what should I be spending my money on.  For example, if you have a mortgage payment. Okay. You’ve got rent. Okay.  We are not talking about saving money there.  There are unnecessary expenses. Almost everyone has.

Cutting back on those expenses NOW. Especially if you’re getting a severance, is so smart.  Doing so, gives you additional staying power in your job search, so that in case the search runs longer than you think it will, you don’t have to take anything out of desperation.

You can interview well. You can look at opportunities for what they are instead of saying, “Oh my God! I need a job!  I really need a job. Help me!  I’ll take anything!”

If you can stay in the job market. If you needed to for an extra 2 months because you cut back on spending, and gives you a huge advantage in the desperation quota.

Again, get everyone’s personal email addresses and phone numbers. Then, from there, figure out where you can cut back on your costs, just in case

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Deciding to Change Jobs – No BS Job Search Advice

 

decidingJeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses what you should do once you decide to change jobs.

 

Summary

Today, let's talk about the decision to change jobs and considering why you want to change jobs. You are listening to this show like others have because you're wondering whether it's the right thing to do. It probably is.  But their are some exceptions to consider.

If there are some financial reasons why you really should stay. For example, you have some kind of loan from your current employer that you would have to we pay immediately if you resign your job and you can't afford to do so.
If you have a mediocre job history. You don't want that job history to be emphasized yet again.  If you change jobs.
Generally, if you're listening to the show, there is something unsettling about your current job situation that you need to address. Maybe, your boss is an imbecile. Maybe you stop learning a while ago.  Whatever it is, it's time to go.

Now, I want you to get clear about what the problems are, write them down, because what will happen is, in the course of your job search, You will forget some of these things and, later on, have to make a decision.  Sometimes, you will have to contend with a counteroffer where an employer is going to go, "But why?  We love you!  You are so important to us!  Please stay! Don't go!  We need you! How much is it going to take? "

Obviously, I am caricaturing what will be said to you, but sometimes people forget what is in their interest and get "bought" back to their current job and nothing is really changed.

So, write down your reasons for wanting to leave.  That's a great starting place for beginning your search.  If you flip your answers around and start looking at what you will need to have from you next employer, you'll find some things you will need to evaluate and consider when you interview.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

Job Search Lessons from the Presidential Election of 2016


I believe there are lessons that can be learned from the first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Sec. Clinton that you can apply to your job search. Both made mistakes that you can learn from.

Summary

Today, I want to point out another one of those lessons that’s coming from this year’s presidential election. The lesson I want to point out comes from the debate that took place this week with Donald Trump and Sec. Clinton and entering “the deathmatch.” One on one. “Manno a Femmo.” I want to offer a less biased opinion of what I saw and what the media seems to be providing.

Universally they seem to say Trump was awful. When I saw was that in the first 30 or 40 minutes of the debate he matched up well. They obviously disagreed on items and you would expect that. I thought he was accurate and some of his statements on the impact of trade policy and matched up well with her there.

There was a point after the 30 or 40 minute mark where the tide clearly turned. At this juncture, Sec. Clinton’s preparation served her very well. For you as a job hunter, I believe there are lessons that you can learn from both candidates. Critiquing both of them I think there are things that you can take away.

He was not as well prepared as he could have been. Yes, we all read these stories about how he wasn’t going to be doing debate prep and a variety of other things. It’s kind of like going to an interview without preparation and deciding to “wing it.” Presidential debates on job interviews and were seeing the two people in making decisions about them.

Trump didn’t do well he did well in the first part of the interview but in the next hour of time, I thought he did poorly and revealed his lack of preparation. The words didn’t come out well. Even his snarky comments where he whispers into the microphone to disagree with her, he hadn’t done them with an audience before and appeared to be snarky.

I think Clinton made mistakes, too, and the biggest one was that she was smug. She appeared to bask in her own magnificence and missed opportunities to connect with the audience. Yes, she had punches to the ribs and kidneys throughout. Here is one example. Talking about how Trump and his businesses didn’t pay bills to small businesses like her father’s. Her father’s business never did business with Trump. she used it to illustrate that a lot of small business owners who were stiffed by Trump.

She would have a smile on her face that was arrogant, smug and not likable.

To me, that was a missed opportunity. Yes, the intelligence is there but part of what you try to do as a job hunter is connect with the audience, the interviewer, the panel. You can’t sit back and be so cocky that you turn people of.

So, I want to point out that there are lessons we can take from their mistakes that you can apply to job hunting. I’ve done shws about dumb interviewing mistakes that candidates make involving lack of preparation and being so full of yourself that  \\you are sitting there with a big smile on your face, enjoying yourself, instead of focusing on the audience.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

How to Ask for the Job – No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to ask for the job at the end of your interview.

Summary

Today, we're going to talk about ending the interview and asking for the job.

Asking for the job is one of those classic pieces of advice that recruiters offer and no one really explains how to ask for the job. You never want to go into that situation by saying, Please give me the job! I need a job!" or anything that could be interpreted in that way; instead asking for the job is really a euphemism for expressing interest. So, I don't think it's appropriate at the end of the interview to say things like, I would be a perfect for this job. When are you going to hire me?" . . . or words to that effect or anything they could be interpreting that same way. Instead you want to express interest.

So at the very end, when they signal they are wrapping up," I think the smoothest way to end is to say,"I just want you to know how interested I am in this role. Have I answered all your questions? Is there anything else you need to know in order to feel comfortable with me in this role? Is there anything that's left unaddressed that you might want to ask me?" In this way, you have you given them one more cut at asking you questions you also expressed interest.

When they say "no. I think I've gotten everything I need."

"Great! What would the next step be there in the hiring process? When might expect to hear back from you in one way or another?"

"Well, I expect we'll finish first round interviews next week. We'll be back to you right after that."

"As things stand now, how do I rank? Again, I'm very interested."

That's it of very blunt question that requires that they give you a candidate assessment. To me, it's best that you know right then and there, but you don't have to necessarily be that blunt if you're not comfortable with that. You can again say,"Again, I want to be clear, I am very interested in this role and look forward to hearing from you about next steps in the process. If I heard correctly. I know this isn't cast in stone, because sometimes cancellations and reschedules occur but I might expect to hear back from you within the next week.

"Yes."

"Terrific, thank you so much look. I look forward to meeting you again as well as other people on the team."

The idea is to express interest. I happen to like that question about where you rank in the process because I would rather have you get honest feedback than the current BS where they don't respond back right away and getting delays and you are holding out hope unecessarily. Sometimes, people make the mistake of freezing other interviews, waiting for that one thing.

You keep going out there interviewing until you have the offer in hand because otherwise, you can get caught short. You can be misled by someone who doesn't have the courage to be honest with you. And, again, if they say to you, "You did really well. We think very highlyof you," they still not committing themselves to you. At least you're getting good feedback by being told you interviewed well.

There may be reasons why they choose someone else that include in differences in the compensation, personality and fit and a variety of other things.

At least for now, you're getting feedback that you interviewed well. So, to me, the best way to ask for the job is to simply say, "I just want to know how interested I am in this role. What would the next steps be like? When would I expect to hear back? How would I rank amoung the other people you've interviewed so far?

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Why Do Some Companies Say the Position Requires US Citizenship or Permanent Residents?

Summary

Why do some Companies say a position requires US citizenship or permanent residence if the job doesn't require a security clearance?

Firms use that language or language like it such as, "Position requires that you be able to work for any employer without sponsorship," to indicate they are not willing to do an H1B transfer. It doesn't mean that they are not willing to consider someone who has EAD status but they don't want to incur the time or expense involved with doing a transfer.

Why? There are a number of reasons. I don't want to give short shrift to anything so let me do my best to outline some of the reasons.

There was an expense that they incur.

This administration (Obama) has been hostile to both visa transfers and to  sponsorship in general. They make it extremely difficult for organizations to transfer one. Even with expedited visa transfer requests, it can take longer than many employers are willing to wait.

In addition, there was a provision in the bank bailout law called TARP that restricted firms that accepted money under the law from hiring individuals who required sponsorship as either an employee or as a consultant.

As a result, although the blame goes to the employer, is actually government policy that is made it exceedingly difficult to hire people who require visa transfers.

Again, this is not about whether or not you can do the job. I'm sure you can. This is about a situation where a firm is incurring an expense, time that their in-house counsel has to incur to do the transfer. In addition, there is a hostile environment toward visa transfers by the US government. Finally, there is legislation the requires firms to hire people who have US citizenship or green card status.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiter—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.eff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle for $.99 and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.”

How to Respond to a Low Ball Job Offer – No BS Job Search Advice Radio

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers  a simple strategy for responding to a job offer lower than what you are looking for.

Summary

Today, we're going to take a salary negotiation scenario out of, "Shark Tank," the ABC series where entrepreneurs come to pitch product ideas to five potential investors. Here is the classic scenario on the show: one offers to purchase more stock for the same money being asked for by the entrepreneur. So, let's say,  an entrepreneur walks in and says, "I want $500,000 for a 5% share of my firm," one of the sharks will counter and propose that they give $500,000 for a 25% share of the firm. In job hunting, a similar scenario occurs when you ask for a particular salary and they offer a lesser amount to you.

You have a number of different ways of responding when you receive a lower offer than what you're looking for. However, before I start describing how you can respond, I want to remind you of the quote from the old movie, "The Godfather." The line from the movie is, "It's business. It isn't personal."Don't respond indignantly to their offer; start by reselling your capabilities to them. After all, for them, it may have been a long job search to find you and they may have forgotten some of your value along the way.

If that doesn't work, the usual advice people get is to say that you want to think about it. However, like on the show, people often want to "think about it" longer than the firm is willing to allow them to do so. The offer was rescinded. In much the same way as on, "Shark Tank," even the request can be met with the offer being withdrawn.

Instead of asking to think about it, you can come back with a counteroffer. Let's say, you are looking for $150,000 and they extended an offer for $140,000. "I think this is a great opportunity in I'm willing to be flexible but I would like you to show some flexibility, as well. I would accept this offer at $147,500." They may respond by telling you they can go that high and counter propose for $142,000 or $144,000 or something else.Whatever it is, you move them up from their original offer. That's the game plan – – to move them up from their original offer by expressing and showing your flexibility to them.

 

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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