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Stop Spamming Your Resume!!!

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter speaks bluntly about resume spam.

Summary

I believe lots of resumes today I got to a point where I have stared at so many resumes that in no way shape or form fit what my clients are looking for.

Let me give you an example. I post a position for a global data center manager. The spec I posted was very clear about what I was looking for and what the expectations are. A person is going to run data centers. Even if you know nothing about that, you know that you are expected to have experience running a data center. #.

Why?

What did you see that in any way shape or form see the major qualified for that job?

Do you see the word, “qualifications,” in the job description? That is what the firm is looking for. That’s what the recruiter is looking for in order to identify someone that fits the job.

A CVS store manager. Give me a break. You are a spammer. You are no different than the Viagra people except your stuff isn’t blocked; yours actually gets through… But not anymore. I’m blocking you.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Giving Your Resume To Someone

Jeff Altman The Big Game Hunter explains why giving your resume to someone who works for a company you want to target may not be the best way to get an interview.

Summary

Let’s talk today about approaching the furniture interested in working for. Conventional wisdom says to give your resume to someone who works there and have them bring it to the hiring manager as though this is the magic bullet that can get you the interview and advantage you are getting hired.

It can, but the thing that most people don’t do is find out how close this person is to the hiring manager. I give you an example. Someone contact me and says, “I know this terrific individual. They are phenomenal. They are swell. They are terrific.” The person approaches me as someone I barely had contact with if. As a matter of fact, the last time I heard from them was only asked to connect with me on LinkedIn. How much do I really trust this individual? The same might also be true with the people you’re giving your resume to.

The goal is and just to give it to someone who works for the firm, but to find someone within the firm who is well connected with the hiring manager.

Barring that, you are sending your resume to the black hole because the hiring manager has no reason to trust this individual anymore then I have to trust that person who says, “this person going to refer to you is terrific, colossal and swell,” and they had nothing to do with anything I do recruiting for plus I don’t know this person who was telling me how wonderful their friendliness.

There are times where it is better to work with a friend to send a cover letter that addresses that addresses some of the pain points a firm has in hiring someone for this job. It can also be better to use a third-party recruiter who has had a good relationship with his hiring manager to introduce you. Otherwise, you are giving your resume to a different version of the black hole.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Why Are You Putting Up With It?

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter draws from his own experience to talk about the decision to change jobs.

Summary

I want to talk with you about the decision to change jobs and draw upon my own experience. On two occasions in my career, I was working for organizations for 10 years or more. I was clearly entrenched in these organizations, very comfortable despite some of the nonsense that existed there.

We all know every organization has nonsense – – people of personalities, they have moods. You live with them for a long period of time and some of those times of frustrating.

In the most recent instance, I was associated with the firm for more than a dozen years and no matter what I did, the matter what I said, there was a lengthy period of time I was hitting my head against the wall in frustration. Still the idea of changing jobs didn't come to mind.

It one more instance (the details aren't important) for my wife to interrupt me one day and ask, "Have you thought about changing jobs at all?" Ultimately, I decided to start my own firm

Sometimes, you just have to listen to what someone else tells you or ask you and pause and ask yourself a question, "Why not?" What's keeping you there? What's so good about this situation that you want to go through all the frustration you go through?

I've been in sales for a long time and much of my income comes from commission. For those of you were not in sales, is it worth the salary that you are getting to experience all the frustration that you're going through?

Why are you accepting this? Who are you trying to please in all of this?

When all is said and done, ultimately, let them make the right decision for yourself. However, if you are noticing that there are more days than not when you are referring to things that can best be described as "nonsense," when no matter how are in Africa making success is not available to you, sometimes that's because the market that you're serving, sometimes that's because the systems that your operating (i.e. the company rules and regulations that get in the way of you obtaining the success that you want), why are you putting up with it?

My encouragement to you is to stop for a second and think or have an ally available because (like in my case, my wife) who, in a very simple way, asked "Have you thought about changing jobs yet?"

Then, think about it. Why not? Why not change jobs? Why tolerate the mediocrity of your current situation, your lack of contentment and happiness that comes with your current role?

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Job Search Lessons from the Broadway Show “Cats”

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter invokes a memory of the Broadway show, “Cats” to remind you of making your answers to interview questions seem fresh.

 

Summary

I want to talk with you about one of the mistakes the job hunters make way too often. It is the me a mistake but very experienced job hunters make. It’s the mistake of letting their interviewing get stale.

What often happens is that the job hunter has been on so many interviews and they were asked the same questions repeatedly.

Why are you looking for a job?
Tell me about yourself?
Do you have any questions for us?

Even if you’re in the area with very specialized skills, the question start to get very predictable. The result is that people start to get bored with the interview and get stale.

Understand that from the employer’s perspective, they are only hearing your answer for the first time even if you answered the same question for others 20 times.

Someone remind you of something that I learned many years ago. I used to live in New York. Do you remember the play, “Cats?” The one with the song, “Memories?”

I thought about it one day that in this long-running show (a, yes, the cast changed many times over the years) and that normally cast members and apart for at least a year or so. This performer is saying the same lines, seeing the same songs, night after night. They are performing six days a week, eight shows a week. Their commitment is to make it seem as fresh as it was on opening night. After all, the audience may only be watching the show for the first time and they are paying full price.

You can’t imagine that the actors and actresses have gotten bored by now is saying the same things and singing the same songs over and over and over again.

Remember, your job is to be like performer in a Broadway show on opening night, delivering your lines like it is on opening night, making each performance seem fresh, just like this performer stating, “Cats” so that the audience can see you in your magnificence and applaud ferociously at the end of the performance.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions. JOIN NOW BEFORE THE PRICE INCREASE ON SEPTEMBER 5TH

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You Don’t Need to Spend So Much Time Job Hunting

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out what seems obvious — job hunters think they spend more time than they actually do in their job search and tells you how to solve this problem.

Summary

One thing I know about job hunters is that you think you do more than you actually do. You think you spend all day looking for work when in fact you spend most of the day blowing it off.

I want to help you. I want to help you see how much time you actually spend job hunting on any given day. This is going to be true if you're working full time and doing this during the evening. It's a very simple philosophy and one that will help you discover how much effort you are actually expanding versus how much time you spend thinking about job hunting.

What I want to do is keep a log daily in your phone, write it in a notebook on a spreadsheet, I don't care.! I just want you to record your activity every day to support your job search.

It can be very simple. Looked at Indeed. 8:45 AM to 8:57 AM.

Called so-and-so. Left message about networking.

Did research into organizations the to the kind of work I am interested in.

Whatever it is you write it down and the amount of time you spent doing it.

Give yourself two weeks. Review it. See what you've actually done and how much time you've really spent job hunting.

This will probably lead you to an aha moment where you realize that perhaps you spend an hour a day doing work related to job search. Maybe it was two hours.

It will beg the question, "what did you do the rest of the time?"

Now if you can get that an hour up to two, if you can get that to up to three, this will be a lot of progress for you folks.

The only way for a lot of you folks to learn how little you did is to keep this kind of a log, tracking the effort that you actually spend, and staring at it and been faced with the data.

Then you will realize, "Gee, I'm not really doing that much. I'm really wasting a lot of time with nonsense."

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Forgotten People to Network With

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter talks about some of the people many forget to network with When job hunting.

Summary

This podcast is about some of the forgotten people to network with. People who know you, want to help you but, so often, people forget to network with and ask for advice.

The first category of people that individuals often forget about our former bosses or managers. You know, those people who watch to day in and day out performing your job. These are folks who are senior to you and connected to different folks than you. Perhaps, there networking expertise is something you should model yourself after.

Many of them have joint professional organizations and gotten involved. Many of them continue to have lunch with, dinner with, talk with former subordinates, former managers of theirs. They don't do it to change jobs all the time but to stay in touch in case they need them.

This is something to model yourself after and a person you should reach out to.

The second category of people that individuals tend to forget about are clergy people. No matter what your religious group, the clergy have connections with (excuse me if I use the wrong term to describe how they might be referred to in your faith) their congregation, their attendees, their participants. They might know some of the professional needs.

To be clear, you're not going to go to your religious leader and say, "I need a job. Can you help me? Please. Please. Please."

But you can say, "in case you don't know this, I'm in a situation room looking for work. You might hear something that makes sense for me and, if you do, please point that congregant to me."

Another thing, whether it is your former manager or religious leader, you might simply ask whether they have any advice for you. Now the nature of the devices would be different from person to person and whether this is a religious person or a business person. The advice may be incredibly worthwhile.

You may think the advice you would get from the religious leader will fit but it may be the most important advice you receive in your job search.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Should I Ask for a Referral Bonus from a Recruiter?


I don’t like the person I would be referring but isn’t this what recruiters do and they are paid for it.

Summary

No, it is not the same thing the recruiters do. You've done one small part of the recruiting job--you know someone. Whoopey! You know how many other parts there are? Of course you don't

The job of being a recruiter is not just simply taking the name and going to the client and saying, "here. This person is perfect. Them and send me a check."

There are so many more details the going to be a successful recruiter that you don't have a clue about! So I want to dispel that notion that, just because you know someone, you should be entitled to a fee.

Now, the maker of the first part where you ask whether you should ask for a referral bonus. Let me ask you a question. When you refer someone to a doctor, are you asking for a referral bonus from them? How about a lawyer? An insurance agent? Plumber? Certainly US for a referral bonus for a plumber. How about a restaurant. Certainly you do that with a restaurant!

But you want to do with the recruiter. You want to hold them up.

Now I'm sure they're going to be many comments from people who believe that you should ask them for money but would never think of asking the doctor, lawyer, insurance agent, plumber or a favorite restaurant for money.

I'm sure you are told by people, "why not? They are getting so much money from their fee."

And I have to tell you, folks, you have no idea what goes into the job – – how much heartache and agony they experience in their job that you are clueless about.

There are some awful recruiters and some tremendous ones. Why can't they are living without you sticking your hand in your pocket?

You'll do that with all these other people that you have a bug up your butt about recruiters and want to punish the one who reached out to you for this job or maybe who helped you find the job and punish them for the mistreatment you receive from someone else.

Stop it.

Be generous. Be patient.

I don't like the person I would be referring but isn't this what recruiters do and they are paid for it.

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn 

How to Dress for an Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of appearance on income and offers suggestions about what you can do.

Summary

I was listening to a podcast this morning on Freakonomics radio there was about the impact of appearance on income. I know this and impact of appearance on hiring, too.

The show started off by talking about earnings of NFL quarterbacks (for those of you outside of the US, they are referring to American professional football). It is clear from the show that the income of the NFL quarterback who look better than the average was much higher than the income of the average or, shall we say, less attractive quarterback. There is one exception of a relatively junior quarterback who, because of the pay structure in the NFL, is unable to earn market value as of yet.

How does this relate to interviewing?

In the society at large there is a bias toward better looking people. Before you men think you have it better than when, you are absolutely wrong. Statistically, the bias is more profound with men than with women.

With women, the show reports, that they are more aware of the impact of their appearance on everything that they do. Thus, they are very focused on that. In the statistics for men, those who were less handsome or "didn't look as well," earned 8% less then better looking people. There was one exception (one that I consider it humorous one) and that was with thugs where being downright ugly was a professional advantage for them.

For most of us, however, being average looking has a financial impact upon us. Now to be clear, I'm not suggesting that all of us go out and get plastic surgery.

However, particularly from then, who habitually undervalue this, it is important to present yourself extremely well. It is about your wardrobe, your grooming, and everything else that peripherally relates to your presentation and not your competence.

Unfortunately too few people do enough about this.

Now, to be clear I am not suggesting that you go out and buy a $10,000 suit unless you can afford it. I'm not suggesting that you get plastic surgery. There are grooming things and, I know women are going to laugh as they listen to this, that you can no longer be oblivious to.

You know the shined shoes, the dirty fingernails, the ear and nose hairs, your wardrobe, of course .... There are a whole host of things that take people away from paying attention to what is really important (whether you can helps them or not).

As one of my guests on Job Search Radio said, there are people who are very well dressed for the 1990s.. You need to update your wardrobe to look proper for the times.

When all is said and done, if you can afford to forget about 8% of your income, by all means ignore these suggestions. However, over the course of your career, that's a very expensive decision you've made. After all, this translates into several hundred thousand dollars . . . Unless of course you're independently wealthy and can afford to forget about all that money.

So do the things to take care of your grooming and appearance. Take care of yourself. Try to keep your weight down, especially if you're out of work. Stay out of the refrigerator. Don't do things that are going to put pounds on you and cause your wardrobe to look poorly on you. You don't want to wear clothing that doesn't fit properly on you do you? You don't want people to look at you and think you are grotesque.

 

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

You’re Kidding Yourself

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter points out a common misconception people have when they think about recruiters.

Summary

Recruiters. Very charged topic. When I look around at people and their opinion of recruiters, they are universally criticized, complained about and thought poorly of.

Part of it stems from the fact that you have a misconception about who the recruiter works for. Most people think that recruiters work for them; it doesn't work that way.

If the will, how much you paying for that service? And you think you're working for you?

The fact of the matter is that recruiters are hired by organizations to fill jobs. If you fit the requirement do you think you're going to get on the phone and call companies and say, "hi! I've got this great candidate! You've really got to talk with them! They are terrific! Best person I've ever spoken with! Sorry, you don't need someone like that?"

And may call after call on your behalf trying to market you the companies.

It doesn't work that way. Recruiters work with organization that defined a need for a person with a certain kind of background and go out and find. They are paid for that service. To do that they need to find someone like you.

I say like you because it may not be you. It may involve someone with a different set of skills. Even if you have the same skills as the firm is looking for, do you think they're only sending in one person? Of course not!

They are going to send it is many is the client will let them submit in order to ensure that they collect the fee. By sending in a lot of people the recruiter is hoping to encourage them to make a choice of one of the candidates.

Why do they do this? Because they want to earn a fee.

They are not relying upon placing you and you don't fit. What they care about is referring someone… Anyone… Will satisfy the client and being hired by, then work 90 calendar days and receive a check from the company.

Recruiters need to look out for themselves because you are not going to pay them anything! This is not social work; this is recruiting. Unless they refer someone who is hired, a contingency third-party recruiter will not be paid.

Why do you think they are any different than you in looking out for their own interests? Respectfully, when you think the recruiter is working for you you are deluding yourself.

Yes, to earn their fee, they have to find someone who fits the role the client to specified and will work there successfully for 90 calendar days.

Why do you think this person is any different than you in looking out for their interest?

At the end of the day if it is not you, they are hoping that it is someone else that they are representing. That way, they will make a substantial chunk of money.

So don't kid yourself and think that recruiters are working for you. As many of you know they aren't and that's a fact

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Become an A Player Again (VIDEO)


Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter tries to discourage you from taking it easy and encourage you to become an A player again.

Summary

I don't know how it happens but there was a point for most of us in the US where we start thinking about getting along and being average rather than being extraordinary. You hear the words, "Take it easy," enough times that I think it has an influence. I think there is a part of us that doesn't want to stand out because, at least for some people, they think they'll be chopped down at the knees by the other people and, on the other side, there is a part that basically says, "Maybe I'm not good enough."

I'm not going to be a therapist here. What I want to say is start thinking differently. Think about becoming "A" performer, not the average performer. Average performers get paid average money. Exceptional performers, ones that developed the habit of being extraordinary, whether it's with the firm that you're working for now or the next firm that you go to, they pick up on your ability to be extraordinary. They seek being the best and firms want to pay you for.

Stop being average. Go back to really pushing yourself. After all, I would say to you many times over the next few months,... At the end of the day, you want to be paid like a top performer. You don't want to be paid an average wage do you? The way to be paid more is to be extraordinary and to create more value for yourself and your work..

If your firm is it want to compensate you for it , I'm sure that there is another firm that will. But, it all starts with you. It starts with your attitude. It starts with your effort. It starts with you trying to be the best, instead of being just 1 of the pack.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and business life coaching. He is the host of “Job Search Radio,” “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice.”

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

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