EP 2014 Everyone spends a lot of time trying to find the job and very little time figuring out how to launch in your new role. Here, I speak with Ed Evarts about how to do that very well.

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So my guest today is, I can't quite get to the next low; Ed Evarts. And Ed works with leaders to build their self-awareness so they can self-manage more effectively with teams to ensure that they're productive and effective. He's the author of, Drive your career, nine high impact ways to take responsibility for your own success; coming out on September 22, 2020. He also hosts a twice-weekly podcast, 'Be brave at work', which is a title that I absolutely love. Ed thanks for making time to show up today. I really appreciate it.

Ed
Thank you, Jeff. It's great to be here. And I look forward to sharing some; I hope good titbits with your audience.

Jeff
I'm sure they will be. If they aren't, I'm going to be annoyed, but that's different.

Ed
I do not want to annoy you.

Jeff
Thank you, you know better. So people, most of the time we spend time talking about the job search. And here we're going to be talking about launching in the new role. It's the stuff the searches over, hallelujah, everyone's happy. The wife, husband, partner, kids are all thrilled, the dog is going to eat well; and now it's time to start a new job and be a hero right out of the box because you've got the halo around you. And people kind of walk-in haphazardly, don’t they?

Ed
They do; and that's part of what you're describing is what happens that people think their effort ends once they land the job. And so now they are working and they can put all that effort aside and not focus on anything other than the job itself. And the work that I do with clients helps them think about it a little bit differently.

Jeff
So what sort of things should people be doing differently that they don't? Maybe if you can give us the basics of what the typical person does; and then we can start looking at the things that they do differently.

Ed
Well, the typical person comes into a new role and instantly starts looking for kind of low hanging fruit, things that they can implement, or change or does differently so that they are impacting the organization. And by doing so, they're kind of skipping over a variety of activities that they should do in order to really solidify themselves at that organization. And so they start working on projects, they start working on initiatives, and goals and things of that nature; and they are missing some activities, which I'll share with you that they should do in order to make a progress. And then next thing you know, they're so caught up with projects and initiatives and goals, they don't have time to go back and do this pre-work as they start their new opportunity,

Jeff
And when you talk about this, it kind of reminds me about how important it is to connect with the people there. Because I didn't hear you say anything about the people, let alone the peers, the peers of your boss, you might be interacting with, the people along those lines, who are going to be evaluating, assessing you, and things along those lines. So I'm curious about the kinds of things that you think people should be doing when they start off?

Ed
Well, the people equation is supercritical. And one thing that new leaders can do if you are leading a group of people or leading a team is to ensure that during your first 90 days, and I am a big fan of this kind of 90-day window, where you don't make any big decisions. Of course, you make decisions on things that are put on your table that you need to decide, but you don't look for things to change and implement differently.

But during that first 90 days is to meet with folks and ask them what I call the million-dollar question which is, what's one or two things I could be doing in order to do this job effectively.

Because these folks have a history with the person that was there before, they have a history with the company. They know what they like; they know what they don't like. And it's so important for you to know what had happened, so you don't repeat it. People don't want a repeater, somebody to come in and just be like the last person that was there. And the only way you can do that is during the first 90 days, is to ensure that you talk with people about what you could do differently, or what you could do to have a very impactful impact at the organization.

Jeff
One of the things I tell people to do is, and this can take place in an interview with your future boss, but certainly with the people that you meet with once you're on board. My predecessor, what did they do well, what did they do that made you happy, what makes you like that they could have done differently; Because I obviously want to continue the things that you liked, and change the things that you didn't; and that kind of sounds like that kind of Question.

Ed
It is, and you would be surprised how many people don't do that, right? Again, they get so caught up in goals, and objectives, and impressing their boss, but they don't spend enough time understanding critical data points as to how the last person performed the job that they had done.

I'm working with the client now, for example, who is going to take over the leadership of a non-profit. The prior president founded the non-profit 40 years ago. So this person has been in charge of this entity for 40 years, and he is now the second CEO of the organization. And I was talking about just the huge difference and impact that's going to have a new leader in the organization. And the first thing you need to do is ensure people know and this is really the second tip, Jeff, is to ensure that you set expectations for people that you know, on day two, you're not going to come in and change the world, that you want to understand how things work. You want to understand how people work together. Some people work really well together, some people don't. You want to observe this and then after 90 days you can come in and say," Hey, here's what I've observed. Here's what I think I see happening; and here are one or two things I think we could do differently to be more effective". You're going to have so much more credibility after 90 days; because you've now experienced it a little, then a new leader, a new leader, who comes in and after two or three days starts saying, "Hey, here's what I think could do differently". The first thought in people's heads is what do you know? You've just got here a week ago, you can't know everything that we're doing and how it's going; and so we make that error in timing by making the change too quickly.

Jeff
It's funny that you use that example for the person who's been there for 40 years, and the successive steps in. I would think that the first thing that should happen is to figure out what was going on well, during their time. I assume it was a retirement; they weren't pushed out because they're 40 years. They didn't start at age 20, so working with the assumption that they started fairly early stage of disorganization, but still, it was retirement time, and weren't pushed out.

Ed
Well and there's two types of ways that you engage in a new role at an organization: one is you're hired into the company, so you've never worked there before; and day one is day one at the company. Or in the case of the second CEO after the 14-year person is he's worked there, so he has observed the leader in action. He's observed the pluses. And one of the reasons I'm working with him as a coach is because he's observing the minuses, and he doesn't want to repeat those minuses

But the third piece of advice I would give Jeff is, especially for somebody who's taking over a senior leadership role in an organization is to start and create a transition committee. And so a transition committee especially for this new CEO, who is the second person in 40 years, he needs to create some bandwidth around himself, and the impact his leadership is going to have in the organization. And the best way to do that is to create a transition team of people; we're going to help you. You can't do it alone, and you need people to help you spread the word, you need people to help set expectations, you need helps manage the workload that's coming at you; and you can only do that effectively if you have what I call a transition team.

Jeff
Ed so many people walked in with hero complexes, 'I'm going to ride in on the white horse and save the day. I'm the new Messiah of the organization, I'm going to lead you into salvation'. And a person who's elevated may not have that sort of thing, but they have a variation of it, that basically translates into, 'I'm in charge'.

Ed
Definitely! And I think they all have a variation of that. And I think you're right, that there are people who are like, "Hey, I'm here. I was hired for a reason to save this company, and I'm going to start on day two". And you know, quite frankly, unless it's low hanging fruit of something that needs to be fixed, like a client complaint that needs to get addressed, day two is the wrong day to start making those types of changes. And so you need help from others to help you navigate and ensure that the perception people have of you isn't that you're the superhero who's going to save the world, but someone who's come in to lead them to do their jobs more effectively.

Jeff
And I kind of think of a comparison from sports, where you have two coaches in the New York Giants. The original one Bill Parcells, I'm thinking of, and then later on Tom Coplin basically had a leadership team with players around them, because both of them were a little, shall we say roughly around the edges of personalities. a polite way of saying, they were gruff is all hell folks.

And Coplin in particular annoyed his team. And it was little things like, "You're late", if you're not there, 10 minutes early.

Ed
Right.

Jeff
And eventually, the leadership team was brought in by the ownership said, we've got to soften this up a little bit as the players are rebelling, which is absolutely true. And the idea of is having senior players within the organization, not coaches, not people with titles, but senior players, who had positive reputations with their teammates. In effect, be the buffer between the coach and the rest of the team. And It kind of sounds like that's what you're talking about here.

Ed
Well, I guarantee you that those New York Giants coaches did not have transition teams to help them figure out the best way to start leading. And it sounds so subtle, but something like, if you're not at the meeting, 10 minutes early, you're late, is a behavior that is an expectation by that person, right? So unless I know that I'm going to find out probably in a negative way, which is I'm going to show up two minutes early thinking I'm early, and I'm going to get in trouble because I wasn't there 10 minutes early, right.? So you know, those are all the things that new leadership brings to organizations, they are very subtle, but over time if they're not addressed, they explode, right? And finally, that coach says, "You know, gosh, darn it, I'm sick of this poor behavior. I want to see this, this, this, and you're like, "Wow, wait a minute, where did all this come from"?

Jeff
Right, so backing up for a little bit to the first meeting with all the others; and we're going to first talk about this from a leadership perspective, but we also look at it from the staff perspective as well, a staff person joining an organization, what sort of things might be asked of the people that you're meeting with? From the standpoint of the leader of an organization like the one that you met, who are they meeting with? Is it the board? Who are the conversations with? And for the staff person, who are they going to be getting together with?

Ed
Well, the first question for a staff member, let's start with that person, is who do I need to meet with? So you need to speak with your boss and say, again, to set an expectation that during the first 90 days, I want to assess what's happening, and how it's happening because I believe I can impact the organization more effectively. If I do that, and maybe 60 days, I'm not saying it's literally 90 days, but you need a window of time that you set an expectation for; so you have the ability to observe and influence what's happening at the organization. So you need to get a list of names, especially if you're from outside the organization of whom you need to speak to; and then you need to speak with those people. And you need to go through a very structured experience with them, where you send them an invite, you ensure they understand why you want to meet with them, you want them to understand the goals of meeting with them, and that you spend time talking with them about what they've experienced in the organization.

I loved your example from earlier, what did the prior person do well? What could the prior person have done differently? What do you think we could do differently to be more effective? If you were king of the world, what's one thing you would do here that others haven't done? This is a huge behavior on the part of a new staff member to understand exactly, quote, unquote, what they've gotten themselves into, because oftentimes in recruitment, we're in heaven, and there are no problems and everything's perfect here. And then on day one hell kicks in and it suddenly, oh, and by the way, you have to terminate Ed tomorrow. It's like well wait a minute, just started, but these things happen, right? So you need to ensure you know who you talk to falling under that behavior, Jeff, of talking with people to understand what it is that worked well, and people are looking for you to do in order to be more effective. Not similar to a leader, who also needs to understand who reports to him or her in the organization, and speak with those people about what could be done differently, etc., in order to have a positive influence on the organization.

Jeff
So let me speak to the staff person, for example, and simply say, you know, you were lied to during the interviews. And I say that very simply because I've never heard of an employer ever say to a job Hunter, "You know, I've got a problem here". My predecessor got fired, and so did hers. And it doesn't take a genius to figure out my butts on the line; and I need to hire someone to help me save it.

Instead, everyone puts on these happy smile button faces. We've got a great opportunity with a terrific team of people. Did I mention we're kind of like family around here? Like the family in the holiday movies that are one another's throats. Yeah! And you on the other hand, of course, we're trying to persuade them, you are on good behavior, too. So we got to kind of recalibrate for what the reality is. Obviously, there's some good stuff there, but we just want to make sure that what it is we're stepping into.

ED
Yeah, I think, just interrupt real quickly. I think most people probably have a positive experience that what they were shared, is accurate. But if in fact, life's a bell curve, there are going to be the people you're describing, who find on day one, what they anticipated, is different.

And I've shared with you stories about people whose job title has changed on day one, where they say, "Hey, welcome to the organization. Oh, by the way, we've decided to make some changes and then you're no longer the director of this, you're now the director of that"; and you're like, "What"? You know, how did that happen?

I've had people who have left organizations within 30 to 60 days because the environment and culture were so negative and so opposite what they were described in the interview. Ethically, they couldn't work there, they're like, "This just isn't what I thought I was getting hired into; and before I get into deep and find it harder to leave, I'm going to get out sooner".

Jeff
So true; and thus, at that first meeting, and you're asking about what my predecessor does well? What they've done better work? Where could someone dig in deeper to find out more? What sort of things could they ask to go in an extra layer?

Ed
Well, what you're doing is asking these questions. There is a little bit of magic to the madness, is you're looking for patterns, right? You're looking for patterns, and trends of activities, or behaviors, or relationships. If everyone says, "Bob and Sue don't get along"; then that's probably something thing that you're going to have to pay attention to. If one person said Bob and Sue didn't get along and everyone else thinks it's terrific, it may not be a priority for you, right?

But you know, your goal is to really look for trends of activities, or behaviors that you think maybe having either a positive or negative influence on the organization. So it's not just asking the question, and taking good notes, and then going home, but it's listening really well. It's asking questions, follow up questions, and general questions like, and tell me a little bit more about that. What do you mean by that? Right? Without getting too specific, you know, someone will say, "Oh, you know, your predecessor
could have gotten back to people better". Well, tell me a little bit more about that? Well, and after you ask it three or four times, you get to the point, right? You get to the key activity that that leader wasn't doing that you can now do differently, right? Or at least be aware that people are sensitive to it; because people are different, sensitive to different things, and different cultures. And you want to be aware of that to know again, what you've gotten yourself into,

Jeff
And I'm wondering if one of the questions they might ask, and this is me being with my therapist hat on; because I have that training as well.

Ed
We have to take the coach hat off and put 17:13 [Inaudible]

Jeff
That's right! It becomes, why do you think that was? I'm sure asked them to stay in touch with you, and they didn't. Why do you think that was?

Ed
Right! These are very general questions. And people worry because they say, "Well, Ed, I don't know what questions to ask". I'm like, "You don't need to ask a specific question; you don't need to be a subject matter expert on the topic; ask, can you tell me a little bit more? What did you mean by that? Why do you think they did that? Right? These are very general, non-specific questions. But what it does is it causes the person being asked a question to dig deeper.

There's an exercise I forget what it's called, the three questions or six questions where you say why? Because the first thing the person said isn't the real reason but it's a very general reason. And you say, "Well, why is that"? And then they give you a little bit more clarity; and then you say, "Well, why is that"? And then finally there after three or six questions, you get to the key point that they were trying to make that the generalized way at the beginning.

Jeff
So, folks, we're back to the fact that people try to be delicate..

Ed
Right!

Jeff
In how they answer questions; politically another way of interpreting that word, and as such, you don't get complete information. Even in the case of co-workers who are one another's lungs, consistently trying to rip the other one's heart out. People operate at a high level of defining it and unless you ask them, "So what's the history of that? How did that happen"?

Ed
Well, some people can be curious, right? So you could be having a tough time in a new job and go see a colleague and say, "Hey, you know, can I talk to you a little bit about x, y, and z"? And that person might say, "Well, I can't but what have you been told, right"? Because I want to know a little bit more about what you've been told, so I can understand the gap between what you believe and what you're experiencing. And they may be very candid to say, "Well, I don't believe what you've been told is accurate", or "What you've been told is partly accurate, but not fully, but let me tell you my perception of the experience" Because the more you know, and I think what we're also talking about Jeff is transparency, and condor, right? The more I know about stuff that's accurate, the better I am at doing something about it. If I don't know the truth, who knows what I'm trying to solve, right? If I don't know the truth, but if I know the actual experience of the truth people has, now I have something I can do something with.

Jeff
Right. And, folks, if you've watched me at different times, or listen to me at different times, you know in the interview process, I believe in trying to get an idea of number one, what their expectations are going to be of you for the first 30, 60, 90 days? So we're right on board with this. But then there's the one year mark to get an idea of what the deliverables are going to be? How they're going to evaluate you after one year.

I've got some sweet language around that; so it's not just simply, "Hey, so tell me what success is going to look like after a year". Because I only know how to answer and they can call you with that; so I have some different language that basically translates to the same thing that gives a more honest appraisal. And as you're starting to hear some of these pieces of information, remember to connect the dots back to what you've been told that your objectives are for a year, and for 90 days, so you can start seeing how this can get smoothed out or may cause interference with you achieving some of your objectives so you can start addressing them early in conversations with your boss. That will make sense? Because I'm kind of taking your ideas and some of mine and connecting them together.

Ed
Oh, it makes perfect sense. I mean, a lot of the work we do, and when I say us, I mean you and me Jeff are helping people on the how part of their job. I'm not an expert in the what side, so if I'm working with a pharmaceutical engineer or an attorney, I can't help them be a better attorney, technically, or a better pharmaceutical engineer technically. But what we spend time on is how they're leading, how they're influencing, how they're building their self-awareness on how people are experiencing them, whether they want to hear it or not.

And the one year mark is a great time to do, for example, a 360, where you can go in and ask people, "I've been here a year now, tell me how you're experiencing me. Do you like how I'm working? Do you like how we're interacting? Or don't you"? Right? And of course, it's always confidential and anonymous; so people have a tendency to be a little bit more candid. But if you don't know how people are experiencing you, if your self-awareness is not high, you're going to be in trouble.

Jeff
And we, for those who might not know what a 360 is, could you define it and how it's run by an outside resource or an HR organization?

Ed
Sure, a 360 is a feedback assessment tool where we create a list of rattlers. So you as the client would create a list of ratters, these are people that we collect feedback from. You get the list approved by your boss, so we know that you just don't pick all your poker buddies; and then we invite them, and you actually invite them into the process. Some companies have either self-created or they have bought a 360 online, others look to me and say "Hey, ED what 360 do you use, and can you bring that into the organization?" But you invite them as the client, you ask for their feedback, you ask for it to be candid, you want to know how people are experiencing you, and then we kick off the process.

Jeff
And just to be clear, that was ratters, not Raiders like an awful lot of Stark

Ed
Right, R-A-T-T-E-R-S, we got it.

Jeff
Just making sure. So what are the sorts of things should a person do in launching at a new organization in order to stand out, be more likely to succeed? What's sort of things do you point people to?

ED
Well, ironically, in my first book, raise your visibility and value; I talked about seven, excuse me, visibility accelerators. And those seven visibility accelerators are designed for people who either are not new in an organization but want to raise their visibility; or are new to an organization and want to ensure that they are very visible. So a couple of them, for example, include ensuring that you're very visible within your organization and your industry; and what happens. Jeff is when people join an organization, like the example, we talked about earlier, where all their job work effort shuts down, and now they just focus on doing the best job possible at the organization. They also disconnect themselves from their industry. So whether you're in the pharmaceutical industry, or the legal industry, the manufacturing industry, whatever it might be, it's critical that you look for ways, not many, just a couple, but look for ways to say visible in that organization.

And the most common way for people to join affiliation groups; and every industry has an affiliation group, although today they're meeting virtually versus in person. But you know, every industry has an affiliation group that you can join in order to raise your visibility. And the beauty of being part of an industry group is that you can bring information back to your organization. So you can bring back best practices, you can hire a consultant that you met at an affiliation group, you can bring back new trends or best practices that you want your organization to be aware of. So, you know, that's one area that I also see many people shut down, that I believe the opposite behavior should exist, which is actually ensuring that even though I'm working, and even though I'm employed, and even though my company is expecting me to give 60 hours a week, I have to stay visible within my industry. Because also today, we know that someone can get laid off at any point.

I am sure you can remember, you know, 20 years ago, most people got laid off in January because that was the state started the fiscal year, if at all. I mean, there were times where layoffs rarely ever happened. Now they can happen any day of the week, for any reason, to any number of people. I'm not suggesting any of our listeners might be that way, but I guarantee you if it does happen, you'll be very glad that you are very visible within your industry.

Jeff
And I'll go back to the days where would happen before Thanksgiving to avoid the Christmas bonus.

Ed
Right!

Jeff
So early in the week, like the Monday of Thanksgiving week, people were nervous about whether they'd be called in. If they saw people in suits in the conference room, they knew layoffs were coming.

And I'm curious, I'm going to back up to something; and it was your reference to during these times with so many groups meeting virtually. Is there a difference in having these meetings with the different constituencies in an organization done over videos in WebEx, however, is being done? And do you sense any sort of a difference in how the communication comes out, how authentic it is, stuff along those lines?

ED
Yeah, I mean, this is a whole new world order. Ironically, people have been connecting virtually for years, so this isn't like something that just started in March, and everybody is trying to figure out how to navigate it. But, the most basic one, Jeff, that people need to be highly aware of, is what I call presence. And we talked about leaders and their presence in person, but your presence online is as critical as in person. And I hope you can see today that I'm sitting in the middle, I've got a nice centered look, I don't have a fake background of the Bahamas. You know, this is my house, right? So we want to be transparent because this is where I live, and this is where I work.

So one piece of advice I would give folks is to ensure whether it's a small 20-minute meeting or an hour session or two-hour workshop, that you're very, very present; that you have other technology turned off, that you're physically, obviously committed to the meeting, that your camera is set.

I have people who look like this during the whole session, because their videos here, but their camera is here. And I want to jump in, I can't but say, "Hey, you've got to create a different setup because it doesn't look like you're paying attention". Right? So I would just say, you know, presence, as number one is a huge differentiator for people in virtual communications.

Jeff
And they'll pause for a second and say, "We have two monitors, you have to be aware", just the same way is if you have a single monitor. I use zoom for everything that I do, and you put it on speaker view so that the speaker is front and center. I'm in a small window above, and thus it looks as though I'm making eye contact.

Ed
Yeah.

Jeff
And that small thing, I remember one time I had a labor department case in New York against the former employer who owed me money. And the meeting was done virtually with the referee in Albany, New York and us in New York. And I'm talking to the camera. I know exactly where to look. My former employer is often Lala land and not making a connection with people; and that's what you need to do. Now, this is all about the first connection, just like an interview is the first connection.

Ed
Yeah, it is. And, I would also tell you, as we talked about this topic, there are a couple of things that you need to do a little bit differently, or some people need to do a little bit differently. I'm not suggesting anybody does what you and I are doing, but a large number of people don't; is also making sure that you are in a place where you can turn your camera on. Because people being able to see you and see you live is a huge differentiator.

And one of the key differences between virtual experience and in-person experience is virtually I can see everybody. I mean, I'm looking at everybody's face directly. If you're sitting in a boardroom table, I have to do and look down to be able to see somebody who's talking; or if we're at different tables, I've got to turn around and look but virtually I can see everyone face on the whole time. And so you don't want to differentiate yourself negatively to other people that are there, so make sure you have a camera, make sure that you're poised professionally, make sure; I'm not a big fan of the electronic backdrops because I don't think technologically we've gotten there yet. People still disappear and they go in and out, etc. And that's a distraction, so these are all things Jeff that people could do to be more present at virtual meetings.

Jeff
So finally, you talk about the backdrops, there are people whom I coach who put up the Bahamas scene, and they move ever so slightly part of their arm disappears. They've got the white around their head.

ED
Yeah!

Jeff
It just doesn't work perfectly. It works very well, but not perfect. Also with zoom, and I presume other platforms, this background noise cancellation that's now available on newer releases of zoom, make sure that that's configured because the last thing you want is the sounds of the kids running by, in the backdrop. It really does a very nice job of noise cancellation.

ED
And this is for people who are new to an organization, going back to one of our earlier topics. You know, this is a way that you can establish a standard for yourself, especially if you're a leader. You don't just tell everybody on day two, "Hey, here's how I expect you to look on zoom", but you observe and watch, right? And then after 90 days, you can come back and say, "A couple of things we could do a little bit different to be more effective is to be more present on zoom. Here's what I've observed over the last"; and we keep saying zoom, there are a number of vendors Google Microsoft, right? Zoom is like Kleenex. I think everyone just says it because that's the word. "But here's what I've observed", which is a key differentiator, this isn't something I've observed that other employers, this is something I've observed here. And here's something I think we could do a little bit different to be more effective".

Jeff
I'll go the extra step of saying, for you as a leader in an organization, what are you modelling? What are you showing others in your behavior? Because they spot it right away, especially if what you say is not congruent with what you do.

ED
Absolutely!

Jeff
And my thing is always about people presenting themselves as being world-class, especially if you're in a leadership role; you have to come off as world-class and caring at the same time. So I want to distinguish the two just because so often when people hear terms like that; or professional, you know, it's no personality, hard-nosed, things along those lines. It's not true at all.

I'll just remind you that if you're in a leadership role, one of your responsibilities is to inspire, and no longer a manager, you have people who manage. Your job, one of the big parts of your job is to inspire people. It may involve your selection process, but it also involves, who you are and how you present to others throughout your tenure with the organization. And what haven't I asked you about? What haven't we covered yet that?
I just haven't been skilful enough to draw because I know there's more.

Ed
Well, we have talked about so much, Jeff. I mean, we've given people dozens of ideas on things that they could do differently to be more effective. And, I hope people listen to your intro because my new book drive your career is going to be coming out at the end of September. And in that book, I do include nine ideas that I think apply to people who are either at a role or new to a role that they could do and be more aware of, to ensure they're putting on that best professional look. Right?

I agree with your assessment that this is a time to model good behavior. Don't underestimate people watching you because they are. And this is a great time to demonstrate the best type of leader that you can be.

Jeff
And I'll just be clear, September 2020. And I'll have a link to that book and the first book in the show notes, so you have a chance to check them out. So you spoke about the book again, sell folks about your coaching, practice, what you do, how they might be able to reach you.

Ed
Sure, I have been doing leadership coaching for about 12 years, and I do three things: One is one on one leadership coaching with successful leaders, two is team coaching, which is working with teams to help them be more effective and productive; and then three, it's something I call business strategy, which is working with small companies to help them navigate through a new arena. Due to an acquisition, geography, products, and services, whatever is changing, is new for them. So if folks would like to reach out, they can go to my website, which is, E-X-C-E-L-L-I-U-S dot com, or they can email me at, ed@excelliusdotcom.

Jeff
Thank you. And folks, we'll be back soon with more on Jeff Altman, the big game hunter. I know you know that; and if you happen to be interested in my coaching you and my website, the big game hunter.us as a place where you can schedule a free discovery call to schedule time for coaching. I frankly would love to help you. And if you have questions for me, I have two ways that you can ask them, first of all at the site, or I'll give you a link now. If you go to the big game hunter.us forward slash video answers, I'll respond with a three to five-minute video for you with an answer to your question. Or if you want to schedule 15 to 20 minutes with me, you can go to the big game hunter.us forward slash live; and we'll schedule a short conversation to answer your questions.

Whichever way works for you I'm happy with it. My LinkedIn page is linkedin.com forward slash high end forward slash the big game hunter. Send a connection request to me there mentioned you saw the interview. I like knowing I'm helping some folks. And besides, my network is going to be bigger than yours; it’s going to be able to help you throughout your career. After all, I was number 7653 on LinkedIn. So I'll close by saying, don't be afraid to ask for help. Folks need help more than they know, especially during complicated times like these. I'm Jeff Altman. Hope you have a terrific day and most importantly, be great. Take care

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching, job coaching, and interview coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1900 episodes, and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have a quick question for me, you can get it answered with a 3-5 minute video at https://www.wisio.com/TheBigGameHunter. Want to do it live?

If you want to learn how to interview like a pro, order “The Ultimate Job Interview Framework” from udemy.com Jeff NoBSJobSearchAdvice.comhttp://www.TheBigGameHunter.us/interviews  The Kindle and print versions are available on Amazon.

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

Watch my videos on YouTube at JobSearchTV.com, the Job SearchTV app for FireTV, Roku or a firestick or BingeNetworks.tv for AppleTV and 90 smart tv platforms.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes. It helps other people discover the show like you did.

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nobsjobsearchadviceradio/support

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