Networking During the Pandemic and Other Rough Times | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1940 EP 1937 On this show, I interview Jacob Share from JobMob about networking worldwide and how to do it well, even during complicated times like these.

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Jeff
So my guest today is Jacob Share. He's a job search expert and the founder of the award-winning job mob at job mob.co.il. Yes, you heard that one correctly, folks. With over 20 million visitors since 2007, Job mob is one of the most popular jobs search blogs online. Containing straight-talking advice and humor, yeah, he is funny at times. Based on Jacobs, real-world experiences of finding jobs in the US, Canada, France, and Israel. Jacob, so great to have you on, it's been a long time that we've been trying to put this together. Thanks for making the time.

Jacob
Thanks for having me. It's an honor to be on such a prestigious platform, almost 2000 episodes, amazing.

Jeff
Thank you. And I'll start off by asking as we're recording this, we're in the days of COVID, but it could be any time where people are in isolation. And we're going to talk about networking but people scratch their head when I talk about networking during times like this; because, in most of the time when we think of networking, it's golf coffee, meet a couple of people, get reacquainted, and can't really do that right now. So how do we start doing networking at times where you can't do them the traditional way?

Jacob
Right. Well, there are a number of options. I mean, we are right now, running this discussion over zoom, which is one of the most popular platforms for discussing things through video right now, and so this is just a one on one conversation. Anybody can reach out to someone that they know such as a past boss, a former colleague, and check-in with them and see how they're doing during this trying time. And riff off that to discuss job opportunities, what they're doing, what's possible, what they've heard, and so forth and so on. And that's a very, very simple way of connecting to someone and having a good excuse.

One of the problems that we know as job search experts that is with networking, if not, the problem is that people tend to only reach out when they want something from you. Namely, I need help with my job search; do you have a job that for me, or a job lead for me? And of course, very few people enjoy being reached out, especially if there has been a long time since the last connection. No one likes to get reached out to with a demand, or request right off the bat. At least how are we doing? That's what warm up the connection.

Jeff
Foreplay, we need foreplay.

Jacob
Yeah, it's true. And so ideally, people stay in touch, but people are busy and nobody expects you to stay in touch with everyone you know on a regular basis. I mean, social media was supposed to make a little bit easier, but ultimately people are overwhelmed. They don't do it at least once in a while.

And now the fact that people are in self-isolation or quarantine. They're staying at home; they're working from home, whatever. It's a good opportunity to anticipate a little bit and like I said, to reach out to someone who may not necessarily, but who knows you and who doesn't recognize you when you connect with them, and who will probably want to speak with you; and talk to them one on one like this. So that's a simple way of reaching out to someone like that.

Jeff
I am pause for a second, and reaching out, how do you suggest the reaching out occurs? Send a text and an email, how does the reach of occur? What do you say?

Jacob
Well, okay, so it depends on who you're reaching out to. You may, if it's someone that you in the past. I prefer reaching out by calling if possible, but it's not always an option. Maybe you may not have the phone number, and maybe in a different country, it may make things a little more complicated. So it could be emailed, it could be social media, wherever you think they're most likely to see since your attempt to reach out to them.

Now what do you say once again, this is a very soft. This is what we call a cold call that you're reaching out to someone who knows you. Again, you may have been a while but they know you, they're not going to be surprised at who you are. And so you don't have to spend a lot of time beating around the bush, just so you know, I'd like to check in with people. I'm at home and be nice to talk to someone that I know and so forth over let's meet up on zoom, or whatever it is. If it's in Skype, for example, it could be WhatsApp, who knows, but make it a try to make it a video call, ideally. And let's just say what else see what's going on with you; just catch up type of thing. It doesn't have to be more than that. You don't have to give them some reason to talk to you, unless there is a specific reason. In other words, if by chance, you notice on social media that somebody is looking for a certain kind of information, not necessarily themselves looking for a job, but just something and you just want to jump on that as an opportunity to reach out, that's great. That's great.

And then again, it'll give you an indirect way of coming around to your situation while you're already on the call with them. But in general, there's no question, it's definitely better to reach out to someone when you have something to give them as opposed to wanting to take something. But there doesn't have to be a given take, it can just be as simple as let’s catch up.

Jeff
And the fun thing about these times is there is really a fun thing. You said, it's easier in your message to them can just start off by saying; it feels like 100 years since we were last in touch. And Lord knows your name popped into my mind, and I started to wonder how you were during all of this. And just thought we could connect for a couple of minutes and get caught up. And because of a graceful way to do it, and take advantage of the times that we're in to reconnect a network.

Jacob
Yeah, you know that people are more likely to be available right now at home than ever before, and we don't know how long it's going to last, so definitely take advantage of it while you can. And there's nothing stopping you from lining up a few calls during the day. You don't have to make them back to back, but you can do a few jobs in one day instead of just doing one here and there, as people tend to do in a normal, organic way, I guess you could say.

Jeff
And as we're recording this, we're doing it toward the middle part of August. And this is an important time from a networking perspective; because if these folks are working. One of the things I found is if they're a leader in a firm that has a calendar year budget, there's time to work on finalizing budgets around now. And sometimes you can get written into the budget. So while they're thinking about what their needs are right now, that is going to be finalized in October, the latest beginning of November, they sometimes can pick out a spot for you. It's a great time to do it.

Jacob
I think it touches on a general point that that's really important, which is thinking ahead and anticipating. I think that people don't do that enough. And that's again another classic mistake with job seekers as they wait until they finally lost a job before thinking about what they're going to do next. Whereas, if you are keeping your network warm while you're working, again, you don't have to be reaching out to people every single day, but if you're anticipating what could be one day down the road, then yeah, you can take steps like this. And so maybe right now you are at home, and you do need a job and you didn't manage to take advantage while you could have while you were working. But like you said, you're thinking ahead, you're anticipating that, okay, we're getting towards the end of the year, people are going to start figuring out their budgets for the coming quarters and the beginning of 2021, for example.

And so they may not have an opening right now, Dudley, so because of the COVID situation, but they may themselves be anticipating that they're going to open up again. And maybe you can be part of that because you're getting a jump by doing things ahead of time. Absolutely!

Jeff
I'm curious; in the US one of the best times of the year for networking is the period between what we call Thanksgiving and the beginning of the New Year.

Jacob
Right.

Jeff
The Christmas period.

Jacob
Yeah.

Jeff
And thus, people are much more gracious and reconnecting during that time, their guards’ starts to come down. And just as a matter of course, I'm curious in other parts of the world, is it the same way? You're in Israel different holiday sets. And I know you have a global perspective that I don't have as in-depth. So for my international audience, I'm wondering, does that play out as well that thanks to late November to January, early January period.

Jacob
Well, as you say, it is different in every country, but the idea is the same. In other words, why are people more amenable at that time of year? Because there's a general slowdown, there are holidays that are wrapped up in there. People are, it's also the end of the year, so they're not expecting too much to happen, although in some industries there is a rush because of the holiday season, so it also depends on which industry you're talking about.

But by and large, around the holiday seasons, especially if there are multiple holidays, then yeah, there's a general slowdown, which means that people are more open to discussing things. If you pick your times correctly, like don't do it the last day before the holidays begin, that's obviously a rush day, but that is true.

On the other hand, you also have, you have to be careful to avoid the vacation season. Because for example, in France, normal France, normal times of the year, I mean, normal years rather, France is completely dead in August. Most people take off the entire month. You're not gonna find anybody in the office. And so you may think, okay, it's a slow period, it's dead slow, so it's useless. You're not going to network with anybody unless you bump into them while you're at the beach or something. So yeah, that's not a good time to do this kind of thing.

During a normal year, again, this year, it's a special case. You never know what you're going to get if you reach out to someone. But yeah, you're right that it definitely depends on the idea of being available around the holiday seasons and stuff like. The slowdowns, the slowdowns are when people are freer, less likely to be rush, rush, rush with their work schedules for sure.

Jeff
And what else can people do to network during crazy times like this? Because right now, the classic scenario for networking is, hey, let's meet for coffee.

Jacob
Right.

Jeff
Let's get together or fill in the blank and just really exist right now.

Jeff
Well, okay, so going back to what we were talking about a few minutes ago, that was more of a one on one, kind of a catch-up situation with people who already know you, a sort a warm call as we say. You're unlikely to be able to reach out to a person that doesn't know who you are, and ask them to just talk like this for 15 minutes or two or half an hour unless there's something in it for them, so there's got to be something in it for them. And in that case, what we're approaching is what we call an information interview potentially, which basically means that you're reaching out to someone. You have information that you think will interest on a topic.

Perhaps you saw that they mentioned on social media, they were looking for information about something and you have an answer for them. So you can reach out and say, "Oh, I saw you were looking for this. I'm in that industry, so I'd be happy to talk to you about that". And at the same time, once you have them on the call, or once you have them face to face like this, then you can talk about something for you. In other words, maybe you have a career opportunity you'd like to hear about, or you'd like to ask them a question about their industry that could potentially lead to a career opportunity for you. So in that case, with a cold call, there's got to be a give and take, but you really got to, you've got to tempt someone to take your call. Otherwise, there's just why would they respond? It's their time that they're giving someone who they don't even know.

But these are one on one situation that are likely to work if they're done properly. There are many to one situation or I guess you could say where you join. It could be a conference call, it could be a joint, I wouldn't call this joint webinar but kind of a group call. For example, when the whole COVID situation came about in Israel, we started dealing with it in March; there was the first lockdown, and so on at home. I normally work from home anyway, but I knew that other people were at home at that point. And I figured you know what, let's just do something. Let's just get out there talk to people like this, but get out there virtually.

And so I reached out to another career expert by the name of Hanna 12:26[Inaudible]. Hannah Morgan of career Sherpa. Dot net and I said, Listen, let's do a zoom call. And we'll just open up to job seekers, they can ask whatever questions they have right now, and we'll see, we'll see how it goes; and she's like, "Yeah, let's do it", and so we just set a time. I mentioned it to my subscribers; she mentioned it to her followers on social media and maybe her servers as well. And that first zoom call we were people came and go people came and went, but we were I think the peak was around 26, 27 people.

And the great thing about doing a group called zoom as you can see people, not everyone, but you can see people with their cameras, you can see faces, and so forth. So you can really get a feeling you're on the call with other people. It's not just one on one, and people can jump in. And it really felt like you were in a room as much as possible.

And so you can, I am not at all surprised basically, that zoom has become as popular as it has. Although, and so yeah, that's that worked out really nicely. However, it really wasn't a networking call. In other words, it wasn't it could have been organized that way. And there are definitely people doing this kind of thing, but we didn't go around the room quote-unquote, and ask people to present themselves and then have an open-ended discussion. It was really people asking both myself and Hannah questions, but there are these kinds of group calls.

Actually, there are job clubs that have gone virtual for the time being, where yes, they absolutely want people to join and go around the virtual room like that. And you can meet people that way. And not only that, zoom, this is not meant to be a zoom advertisement. I am not getting paid by them in any way. But zoom, unlike some other platforms, has a feature where you can do what's called breakout rooms. And so what they do is, this has to be something that the moderator is willing to do. And they control it, where they basically send, let's say, there are 20 people on the call, they can break everyone up into five different rooms with four people in a room. And then when you're a small group, it's a lot easier everyone to introduce each other and to ask each other questions, and figure out if there's any way you can help each other out. And, I think that works really, really well, when people come with a mind-set to have that kind of a call.

Jeff
And I think the meeting rooms, the breakout rooms are a big part of how networking can be done in a virtual setting. Now, I don't know if, in the free version of zoom that's available, because some people might know, they don't have the zoom subscription that you and I have.

Jacob
Yeah.

Jeff
We're, as we're as a paid user, you have access to those recordings and things along those lines. But Zoom is very inexpensive, 15 dollars a month.

Jacob
Yeah, it's $15 for a pro. At least, today, it's $15 for a pro account, yeah. Yeah, it's definitely worth it.

Jeff
Absolutely! And thus, what you're able to do is set up a scenario where people can connect with one another privately having those conversations, and where you can set up your own group, which is something I'm a big believer in. Make yourself the focus of the group; promote yourself as being a hub for a group. What you're able to do is to create those connections and start the networking there.

Jacob
So that's a great personal branding tip in general, which is that you always want to present yourself as someone knowledgeable, as an expert on your topic of expertise, whatever your job or your role is, and there's no reason that you shouldn't do it. You have all the tools available, social media. Anybody can start a Facebook group whenever they want, and then reach out to people that they think would be interested, or if there are already many groups on your topic, or on your in your profession, which is more likely, you can jump in. And over time you answer questions and people will start to get to know you as an expert of your topic, and, yeah, then that can eventually lead to other conversations on the road. Because you know what? I had a question I thought of you because I've seen you answering in the group. What do you think of so and so? And there are many times where conversation like that will ultimately lead to a job offer. It may be a consulting offer, it may be a full-time offer; because you just went ahead and put yourself out there, things happened.

Jeff
In other words, generosity can lead to yield results.

Jacob
Yeah, reciprocity works, absolutely works. It may not work right away, you may have to put something out there today, and they only get something back six months down the road, but there's no question that it works. People appreciate it, and they want to give back people that gave them something.

Jeff
So funny, folks, I'll just remind you, nothing works every time. I wish it were different, but...

Jacob
All generalizations are, no, generalization is great.

Jeff
The however is you do enough of these things, you just need one. You just the one to deliver for you, but you got to have a mindset that basically says, I'm going to be a giving person. And yeah, I'm going to use a New York, US expression, you don't want to be a mooch, you don't want to be a taker all the time.

Jacob
Yeah. Give it before you take it. Absolutely, yeah.

Jeff
Our give and take, I'm sorry. You were about to say.

Jacob
Yeah, no, it's listening. Right now, people are so used to getting things for free. People want instant gratification, and so it's just so easy to take. So feed on that, give people things I let them take. And it's true, not everyone is going to reciprocate, but some people will, especially the ones that appreciate the most what you're giving them. So yes, absolutely put it out there.

Jeff
What else can people do during times or in general to do additional networking that can help them find their next job?

Jacob
Well, one of the things that I mean, we're going to mention this later anyway. But I as a part of job mob, riffling on this idea that you know, I saw with Hannah that there is definitely demand for online events. And it was just natural of course. For just like companies have gone completely online, or I should say remote with their workers during the Coronavirus and self-isolating and all that. So many experts have gone online with webinars and with virtual events. Sites like Eventbrite and meet up.

Almost every event that's scheduled for the next two months, at least, is virtual. And so I decided I had an idea to regroup as many job search events as possible on a calendar so that people can come to this calendar and just see what's happening. And they can see are there going to be group events, like I mentioned earlier, where they can participate or are they going to be more learning type events where they can listen to an expert, or are they going to be added where they can get feedback where they can ask questions similar to the event that I did with Hannah, where they can get a question to an answer to a question that's burning. And something that needs an answer to today, which could be as simple as a resume review, or a proofread. There are definitely events for that kind of thing.

And so I would definitely recommend going to that calendar and taking a look at what's coming up and bookmark it and come back to it regularly. But again, ultimately come back to your question specifically about networking in general right now. There are places where we're real-world events still aren't taking place, okay? Where people are going social distancing, they're wearing masks, and they're using an open area. Let's say on a plaza in front of a hotel or on a beach or something like that, and so it is possible to attend.

Again, very few, but it is possible to attend some real-world events. In fact, right now, because they're so rare, the fact that it is a real world event would probably get some attention more than a virtual event. And again, similar to what you were just saying, if you are, I'll put a twist on it. If you don't see any real-world events coming up, then you can always throw one, okay? And just the fact that even if you're running, speaking at the event, just the fact that you put on the event, you announce the first speaker, or whatever, it makes you; it puts you in a kind of position of leadership for that community.

I had a client a number of years ago, who I recommended to him, this in the UK, and I don't remember which industry he was in, but he was professional white collar. And he was having a hard time standing out, compared to other people in his industry. And I said, "Listen, are there any topics of information or any, say topics, from your expertise, that you know, there's a demand to hear about. Is there's something that is hot right now; or something that's coming up soon, that you already have some knowledge about? And he was like, "Yeah, there's a few things", and so I say, "Okay, well, why don't you Go on a site like meetup.com. And just put on an event mention that you're going to be speaking on one of those hot topics or topics to be hot, whatever, and find a public space, they'll be happy to host you, let's say 2030 people. And just put it out there and see who shows up.

And what happened was he did that, I don't think he got a full house, but he had, let's say, over 20 people. I think he was aiming for 30, but he had over 20 people; and that led to consulting gigs for him and eventually a full-time job. And just because he put himself out there and this is something you can do today.

Again, people are not going to want to come to a closed room where no one's wearing masks, and everyone's held together, for sure, but you just pick your spot where it's an open-air event and announce it like that. And the fact that it is a real-world event, we'll get some attention that it wouldn't have usually gone. And yeah, and you can put yourself out there that way. And not only will you network with people at the event, but they will perceive you from a position of leadership because you're the one already arranging everything organizing it.

Jeff
Isn't stopping.

Jacob
There is not from speaking there, you can of course be there as well.

Jeff
It's amazing that with a little bit of creativity, a person can place themselves as in a leadership role, when they might not normally be one. They can wind up being available as an expert on the subject, when they might not normally think of themselves that way.

Jacob
Right.

Jeff
And all it is just by being the organizer.

Jacob
Yep. Yeah, some people have stage fright. They don't like to speak in front of a public audience, in front of, like public speaking. They don't like to do in front of audiences, whatever, so if that's the case for you, you don't have to. Organize the event; let the public speakers speak publicly. Because you're the one who's getting everything together, you're in contact with everyone. That's it; you'll have the same or almost the same level of appreciation from the audience, if not more in some cases.

Jeff
And all you have to do is to as the organizer, if you got out front, and you said, "Hi, I'm a little bit nervous. The first time I'm doing this. I'm so and so, thanks for coming out. I appreciate it. I hope you will as well. I'm just going to introduce our guests tonight. Six or seven sentences, I think most people can handle, and if you're rented, it's okay. And what else can people do from a networking perspective that is going to help them connect with more people in you're thinking?

Jacob
Well, I think that one of the things that we don't talk about enough when it comes to networking is to be directed. So at the beginning of our conversation, we talked, I talked about reaching out to former colleagues and former bosses. They're people, they're an example, or they're examples of people who know you, who know what you're capable of doing, and who are most likely to recommend you to someone who could use your skillset.

But, there are definitely other people who would appreciate knowing you as well. And so you just need to think about that, who would be the one would be most likely to be interested in talking to me, and who would want to get information that I have? Who would want to who might actually need something that I have right now.

And so you can take a little bit of time every day, whether it's on social media or be even more directed and go to companies that you think you might want to work for, see what they're up to read the news about them, what kinds of projects are they working on, what kinds of projects are planning on working on, what kinds of projects have they worked on recently. Look for pieces of information that can help you build a conversation with someone there, but a conversation that's very, very relevant, of course, and then use that as a reason to reach out to them as well.

Jacob
So we talked about how you always want to bring something to the table when you're meeting people. One of the things that we talked about as job search experts in terms of doing research on companies why is it important to research a company when you're considering working there? Well Often we say before the interview because if you get into the interview, you have things to talk about, it's a lot more interesting to get your initial passion for working there because you know about the company. And they can see that right away, it's very, very clear when someone has done their homework or when someone hasn't.

But what I tell people, I'm sure you do the same thing is don't wait until the interview to do that research. No, you should be doing it way earlier in your job search. In fact, you should be doing it as early as possible before you even decide whether you apply to the company because you may realize someone may have recommended a company to you that you think would be great. Something that a place ever wants to work like Google, for example, but then when you actually research into your local business, or your local enterprise, and you take a look at that, whatever and you maybe talk to someone who works there, we used to work there. You may say, you know what, "I don't actually want to work there. I don't think I'd be happy there based on what I'm hearing".

And so doing your research is really important and that will, like I said it will give you ideas of what to talk about with people. I know you know what to talk about, but also who to talk to. Okay?

So just a second ago, I mentioned talking to speaking to former employees, I think there's another thing people don't appreciate. People tend to look at who's working at a company right now, that's logical and makes sense. Why would you want to talk to them, but former employees are going to be much freer with their words because there's nothing holding them back, they have nothing to hide, they're no longer there. Someone who currently works at a company is less likely to say anything negative about a company, whereas someone who no longer works there is more likely to be free again and honest in their painting a picture of what goes on there. And so that can be really, really helpful in helping and getting you to avoid applying somewhere that you would be miserable at, for example.

And so similarly again, how do you find these people? You do the research. LinkedIn is a great place to see where people used to work because you have everyone's CVS, their full histories, so I definitely suggest looking for people that way.

But again, we go back to what we mentioned earlier, when you're reaching out to someone, you've got to have something to bring to the table about, to make the connection with them.

Jeff
It's funny; you use the example of talking to people who used to work in an organization, rather than currently working. And you mentioned LinkedIn as a place I was thinking in terms of Google as well as the search tool. So you might run a search string like a resume, Google, resume, Google, and just yes you're going to get search results of job descriptions, but you're also going to get former employees. LinkedIn is obviously preferable, but your network may not be large enough in order to really find enough of those people. Now if you connect with someone like Jacob or myself, our networks help you to expand significantly. So I'm going to pause here for a second, what's your LinkedIn interest and I'll offer my next?

Jacob
Mine is linkedin.com slash in slash Jacob share.

Jeff
Perfect! Check linkedin.com forward slash i n forward slash the big game hunter. Send a connection request that each of us or network is good, I believe by a heck of a lot.

Jacob
I do want to say one quick thing that it's good that you mentioned using Google directly. Because some countries like here in Israel, LinkedIn is actually not as popular as it is in the States, or in the UK, for example. And so if you only look at LinkedIn, you're going to miss out on lots, and lots of people depending on the industry that you're in. So that’s an important point to think about in terms of your industry. If have the experience, if this is not an entry-level position in your industry, then you're more likely to know if LinkedIn is a good place to go, but if you're not sure, then take a look. I mean, do some research and again, use other sources like doing a Google search directly, absolutely.

Jeff
And their networks in different parts of the world that might be preferable than LinkedIn, in Europe, I remember the network mispronounces gene, XIMG, has been an option. There are other regional networks as well, the same concept, just use those networks as well to start reaching out to people.

We're having fun here, guy, but the time is limited, and we can't talk forever. What other points should be covered today that would be helpful for folks about networking during these complicated times?

Jacob
Well, just because we've talked so much about networking like this video conference and so forth. So what just a quick mention about getting it set up so that it's working properly.

Again, another nice thing about zoom is that with zoom, there is a possibility of testing yourself before you actually go live with someone, before you actually have a call. I think, I have the shortcut right here. I will tell you what it is. It is zoom.us forward slash test. And that will allow you to have a basically put yourself up on the screen, just if you were speaking to someone else and see, okay, how do I look? Is my camera set up properly? Is the lighting, Am I lit properly? How do I sound?

One thing that we all know from watching YouTube videos is that even when the video isn't great, the sound is so important because the sound is scratchy, or it's cutting off or checking out, then that just ruins everything, so it's important to make sure you can hear. You want to make sure that you're centered on the screen as well not off to aside. That doesn't work it looks.

Jeff
And folks, if you want to listen to this as the podcast, I moved off to the extreme left to make the point.

Jacob
I did it first. One thing that happens on Skype sometimes with me is that for some reason my camera shows a split-screen where I divide the screen. It takes my head and puts one half on the extreme edge of one side, and the other half the other side and just looks weird. And so yeah, you want to make sure that your gear is set up again. It's very simple, but make sure things are set up properly for you reach out to someone, well before you're going to have the conversation. If you're reaching out over email, that's obviously not important in this case, but yes, once you're about to speak to someone like this, make sure your gear is set up so that it's going to be a decent call, and you'll be able to speak to each other like normal people.

Jeff
I was thinking about when just started reaching out to people from your past, start with the ones who are in your phone first, because there for a reason, you're probably closer to them. You can text them, you can call them, you can email them, but there's a right in your phone, probably sorrow for the text to them, then progress to the actual email relationships, and then progressed to the ones that; you don't have either which cell phone number?

Jacob
Yeah.

Jeff
Whatever it is, work with the ones that you're closest to first and then do a progression to those that are further out; because I want you to get results.

Jacob
Yeah, yeah, no being systematic is definitely, it will help you progress. There's no question about it. That's good a good formula, for sure, for sure, for sure.

Jeff
Thank you. You got one more in your hip pocket that we can share tonight?

Jacob
Sure, let's see. So we covered gear, we covered how to reach out to people, we covered different ways of reaching out to people, different kinds of events that we can do. We covered; we talked about real-world events as well.

One of the things that's interesting, this came up in a call I had, people were talking about business cards; and business cards when you're online, it doesn't really mean anything. right? And I mean, as it is, in the real world, I still have business cards that I like to give out when I meet people at real world events. Although it's funny because you would have thought that by now with smartphones, people and there have been so many attempts to get people to move on to apps with virtual business cards. It's just not working. People like to see physical cards, even if they just go back to their office or their desk, whatever and toss them somewhere and they never see them again. They still they still prefer to have that. Some people actually do use them, and so when it comes to virtual events like this, well what do you do? I can't give you, like a try to squeeze a card into the camera here; it's not going to come out on your end.

Jacob
So what do you do? So what you can do33:06[Inaudible]

Jeff
Really ultimately what has become the business card is what we just discussed a minute ago, which is your LinkedIn and your URL. And so on LinkedIn, if you haven't done this yet, I still see people all the time, they haven't done this yet. They haven't set up their vanity URL. In other words, they still have their event, their LinkedIn URL is something they can never remember because there's a whole bunch of series of digits and, characters and letters and so forth in it. So no, take a minute, go in there, claim your name, so that it’s linkedin.com slash in slash, whatever your name is, then you don't have to worry about remembering it. People can also, even if they don't have it from your lips, they can at least attempt it because they know what your name is. And so that right now is the closest thing to a virtual business card, it just being able to give.

Jeff
And we just froze there, so that's it about the 33-minute mark. So I suspect your internet dropped, and we're going to hang in there and see whether it returns; and if not, I know to do it for about 33 minutes. So, Jacob, it's no problem whatsoever. And I'll just do the outro from you just to be on the safe side. And I'm just going to bring it up on my screen, which will take a minute because I left it in the email.

Jacob
I am back!

Jeff
Hay! I was just about to read the outro on my expectations. You had an internet drop on your side?

Jacob
Yeah.

Jeff
That's okay. I still love you.

Jacob
I was planning to only have one though.

Jeff
And I'm going to pause and just simply say, and folks, we had an interruption there. Jacob's internet dropped. One of the things about international sessions like this, every once in a while that happens. But we're in agreement having business cards like real business cards; even if people toss it makes a difference because if it gives someone, something tangible and they remember colors. So if you have a colored business card versus classic white, it becomes distinctive.

My card is basically black with a lighter print. It's a two-sided card. So I've messages on both sides for folks.

And when you when you're listening to this as a podcast folks, what you are trying to find is, he held up a white-fronted card with a logo and his name on the back part of the card was dark background with his website there. So this has been a lot of fun, Jacob. How can people find out more about you and your work?

Jacob
Well, the best place to find me online is of course is at job36:14 [Inaudible]. So which is just as simple as it sounds, J-O-B M-O-B. C-O-I-L, but if you don't feel like typing C- O-I-L, just Google J-O_B-M-L-B, and it will be the first result and that's my site.

Jeff
And you also mention the job search events calendar.

Jacob
Yeah.

Jeff
So what's the link to that one?

Jacob
So that's just JOB MOB co.co.io, forward slash events, and that will take you right to the calendar. And I at last check, I think that we have or just over 400, and something odd events that are scheduled the next couple of months. Again, these are not events that I'm putting on. These are events that are happening all around the world, although they're basically virtual events right now. Everyone's doing virtual events across different time zones, many in the States; they're based in America, of course.

Although there are many that are in Australia and Europe, and almost all there are free. And yeah and just take a look on every job search topic you can imagine whether it's networking like this one. If you want to get a resume review, or just learn about how to spruce up your resume, social media, you name it, just go to JOB MOB.co.in forward slash events, and choose an event to sign up for and could happen today. I mean, every single day.

Jeff
Fabulous and Jacob thanks for making time. And folks, we'll be back soon with more. I'm Jeff Altman, the big game hunter. Hope you enjoy this. And my website, the big game hunter.us has a ton of information that you can watch, listen to a read, it's going to help you find work more quickly.

Jacob
It's great!

Jeff
Thank you! If you're interested in one on one coaching, you can schedule a time for free discovery call or schedule flying for coaching. I'd love to help. And by the way, if you only have a question for me, I don't think two options for there at, the big game hunter.us forward slash video answer. What you do is you purchase the ability to ask me a question, I'll send you back a video. That's about three to six minutes in length to answer your question or if you actually want to talk to me, the big game hunter.us forward slash live, and you can schedule a time for a quick conversation. I'll answer a question or a couple of questions in the course of that.

And lastly, subscribe to the channel on YouTube. Click the small icon in the lower right of the picture of me in the upper left to get notified when I release something new.

Hope you have a terrific day. And best of all, I want to encourage you, be great. Take care!

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

JeffAltman, The Big Game Hunter
JeffAltman, The Big Game Hunter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching, job coaching, and interview coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1900 episodes, and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Schedule a free Discovery call.

If you have a quick question for me, you can get it answered with a 3-5 minute video at https://www.wisio.com/TheBigGameHunter. Want to do it live?

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

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