Career Coach Office Hours: June 17, 2022 | JobSearchTV.com

By Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

I answered questions about #jobsearch #hiringstaff #management #leadership #workplace issues. You can also message me on Linkedin before the show and I will answer it, too. Join me at 1 PM Eastern on Tuesdays and Fridays.

Personal Branding on LinkedIn

[02:22] Are recruiters trained to negotiate salaries?

[03:41] What happens if you receive an offer letter and after a few days you called but the senior recruiter says it was an error because he can’t remember sending the offer letter from his computer?

[05:37] If a hiring manager reached out to me for a job and I did one interview and then I said I wasn’t interested anymore due to the pay, but now I want to reach out to see if they can pay more, but would that be weird and stupid?

[06:58] Do I just ignore interview offers from applying for a bunch of jobs, when I already accepted another offer?

[08:25] Why do jobs say they’re “urgently hiring now” but never respond to applications?

[10:06] Is it demeaning to tell someone who can’t find a job to “get a job because there are plenty of jobs around”?

[12:14] What is something that is not or rarely found on job applications, but should always be included?

[14:00] Is it illegal to lie to potential employers about salary offers from other companies?

[15:30] Is it better to answer or not to answer offers for developer vacancies or any position in general on LinkedIn? Since quite a few arrive due to the rise of technology and I am not looking for a job change.

[19:38] Why is the question of future sponsorship asked in every job posted on LinkedIn?

[21:48] What can I post on LinkedIn when I am looking for a job without sounding desperate?

[23:57] How can I tell if LinkedIn inbox messages are from a real company or a recruiter?

[25:00] Why does my LinkedIn Easy Application get viewed but never leads to a job?

[26:21] Is LinkedIn’s easy apply button a good way to apply to new jobs? I noticed that, frequently, there is no way to submit a cover letter that way. Am I wasting my time?

[27:49] Can a supervisor dismiss an employee when they see their profile on LinkedIn? [29:46] Is it acceptable to email a recruiter after applying for a job via Taleo?

LinkedIn Mistakes People Make

Are recruiters trained to negotiate salary? Well, they do negotiate salary, but the mystery question is, are they trained to do it? And most of the time, the answer is no. Along the way, as people become more experienced, they may learn from videos, from peers, from experience, how to negotiate better. Most of the time, negotiation for the junior staff is taken over by more experienced people who’ve done it many times before. So, in terms of negotiation, what does negotiation mean in the context of negotiating salary? I think the answer comes down to can they push you into the job since their client tends to be pretty clear, maybe has a little bit of flexibility, but most of the time, negotiating is getting you to do something that you may not want to do. Sorry, that’s the truth of it. So are they trained? No. They just do it through trial and error.

 

What happens if you receive an offer letter, and after a few days, you call but the senior recruiter says it was an error because he can’t remember sending the offer letter from his computer. What I would say is, you have the offer letter. You send it back to them. You send the screenshot, that includes the fact that they emailed it and you say, “I’ve taken action. I’ve resigned a position based upon receiving this offer letter that you don’t remember. Well, I do and I’ve got the data to prove it. So I consider that I have an offer that I accepted. Go back into your records, you’ve got a sent mail area on email. You don’t remember? Why didn’t you look in sent mail? Why are you trying to duck an offer that you made legitimately? And don’t accept it if they say, ‘Oh, well, I have nothing like that.’ Well, I do. And I’ll send it to anyone in your organization. And here’s the fact of it. I don’t want you getting fired, but you probably will for having done this. So get this solved. Maybe I don’t do that latter part, but just get this solved. Because I have an offer letter. It proves that an offer was extended to me. You sent it. I can send a screenshot that proves it. I’ve got the letter. Solve it.  Okay. So what happens? They probably back down. Who is this person who was so stupid and treated you so disrespectfully? Like you’re crazy. I remember doing this, but you do you have the letter, which is proof

 

If a hiring manager reached out to me for a job, I didn’t want it to view and then I said I wasn’t interested anymore due to the pay. But now I want to reach out to see if they can pay more. Would that be weird and stupid? The truth is, you should have done that at the time. And now, I don’t know how long has passed since the original conversation. But if I were the hiring manager, I might not remember having had the conversation with you. If I did, it depends upon how respectfully you turned down the offer, or the proposal for interviewing as to whether or not I would be interested in talking with you. Now, if I had some flexibility, I might turn around and say, ‘yeah, things have changed a little bit. Let’s talk I can’t guarantee how it’s gonna turn out. But let’s talk’ and thus, that can open the door. But is it weird? No. Is it stupid? No. I think tactically, it could have done it better. But let’s see what happens. By all means, contact them.

How to Make a Strong Impression Networking on LinkedIn

Do I just ignore interview offers from applying for a bunch of jobs when I already accepted another offer? If I’m understanding this question correctly, you’ve accepted another offer. You’re starting. And now people are messaging you. What I’ve been advising people to do recently, only because of the rescinding offers phenomena that’s been going on around the country is I’ve been telling people to continue to interview for a little while after joining the firm. And the idea is you only leave the new employer if there’s something radically better, or they’ve misrepresented the position to you. And what this allows you to do is a failsafe. It protects you in case of misrepresentation. I say misrepresentation, because the statistics are pretty clear that one of the reasons why people are changing jobs frequently is positions are misrepresented to them. So rather than be caught in a situation where you’re hurt, to take an interview for a little while longer– a month, six weeks, eight weeks–really no more than that. If what’s turning up for you is useless, just back out. And that’s the way to handle that.

 

Why do jobs say they’re urgently hiring now but never respond to applications? Well, urgent, urgently hiring now is kind of like immediate. It’s one of those phrases that basically gets people to jump through hoops to respond. So the reason they don’t respond to your resume or through the application you fill out is because your background may not fit twhat they’re looking for. And thus, in messaging you or letting you know that they have an urgent need, which is really what they’re saying, to me, the term urgent need, urgently hiring, urgently hiring. Now, any of these phrases that uses urgent as part of the promotion, is hyping the situation. Trust me, they’re not going to do it instantly. They’re going to engage in a process and try to avoid making a mistake. And in doing so, they’re just trying to get traffic to . . . by traffic I mean people to apply for the job, so that they have a larger pool of people to evaluate. So why do they not respond? Your resume doesn’t make a case for why you’re qualified. That’s really it. Your resume is probably the same crap you’ve been sending to every firm and they’re just not interested. That’s what it comes down to.

 

Is it demeaning to tell someone who can’t find a job to get a job because there are plenty of jobs are out there? Yes. You’re being rude and obnoxious and it’s not helpful. You know, here’s the fact of it. If they’re out trying to get a job, and you’re just telling them get a job, there’s plenty of jobs around. But it may not be the right job for them. After all, I’m going to work with an assumption that, well, when I work with the assumption, let me just simply say, for a lot of people, the wrong jobs are available. And they have jobs that they’re not qualified for, let alone interested in. After all,  if you’ve been a an accountant, would you really want to work on loading things off of a truck? That’s an available job. And you tell them there’s plenty of jobs available, but they’re the wrong kind of jobs or wrong kind of work, they’re not interested in doing that kind of work. They’re interested in doing work that doesn’t relates to their experience and interests, just like you!  So, is it demeaning? Absolutely demeaning, no ifs, ands, or buts about it. It is demeaning to do stuff like that. It’s not helpful; you’re not helping them. Do what they need to do, which is get interviewsm,  get hired. Introduce them to people. That’s helpful. Help them with their interviewing. That’s helpful. But telling them get a job? You sound like an old person. I’m an old person, I know not to do that crap. What’s with you?

The Place to Look for a Job Few People Look

What is something that is not or rarely found on job applications, but should always be included? And the answer is that you took ownership of a situation. Because one thing that managers and leaders want to do is to find someone who takes charge and takes ownership of it until it’s solved. As a result, if you’re in a situation where you’re interviewing, and for example, you’re telling one of the stories that can be answered in response to a behavioral interview question, then what you need to do is to say something along the lines of here’s the situation or task that you did. And between the two, you say, here’s the situation I was in. So what I did was, I took ownership of this, and I made sure that everyone knew I was responsible for solving this problem. I’m the one who . . . I’m the one that I met with the users. I did that. And you demonstrate that you took ownership of the problem until it was brought to a successful resolution. That is a good thing to do.

 

Is it illegal to lie to potential employers about salary offers from other companies? Now, just to be clear, the word illegal means there is a law prohibiting it. There is no law prohibiting it. But you don’t know who this person knows. And thus, their ability to know whether you have another offer is something that you don’t know, After all, if, I’ll just use some some common names. Let’s say you’re interviewing with Facebook, and you say, I have an offer from Google and it’s good offer. And this is an ex Googler who has the ability to contact some of their friends and can pose back to them “Did you make an offer to so and so? What was it for? Because we’re considering her, too.’ And they mentioned that they have an offer. Is that true?’ And that stuff happens much more often than people know. So is it illegal? No. But are you prepared to be bluffed in this situation? A lot of people don’t like to have their bluffs called. And that’s what’s, what can happen.

 

Is it better to answer or not to answer offers for developer vacancies, or any post a position in general on LinkedIn? Since quite a few arrived due to the rise of technology, I’m looking for a job change. So if I’m understanding this question correctly, you’re not looking for a position, but recruiters are contacting you about them. And you’re wondering whether or not you should respond. Now, years ago, when I did recruiting, there was a sales trainer, who said something wonderful, simple and profound. What he said was, ‘the person who gets ahead isn’t always the smartest, they don’t always work the hardest, hey have lots of great qualities. People get ahead by being alert to opportunity. Sometimes those opportunities are internal to their firm. Most of the time, they’re external. So the question comes down to what’s the harm of listening. Listening about a job allows you to make a choice about whether or not it makes sense and after you hear about the job, you can decide whether or not you want to interview forit. You can do interviews by phone, zoom, you don’t have to inconvenience yourself for the initial round. But hearing about a job. There’s nothing wrong with that. It’s not like you’re quitting tomorrow. All you’re doing is hearing about an opportunity. The opportunity may be good for you; it may not be good for you. That right now, all you’re doing is saying ‘no, I don’t want to know anything. I don’t want to hear about anything.’ That’s immature. Leaders, keep themselves open to opportunities and it doesn’t compel them to leave. But what it does compel them to do is notice what’s important to them in the next job or organization? And what would cause them to want to leave? That’s very different, isn’t it? So what you need to do is allow yourself to hear stuff. Now, employers always try and talk their staff out of doing stuff like, ‘Oh, you have a commitment to us. We really need you.’ Until they don’t, of course. So just listen to what they have to say. If they’ve sent you an InMail or an email, all you have to do is to respond and say, ‘Could you forward the job description to me and any elaborating information that you think will be helpful to allow me to decide whether I should consider this.’ Simple.  And then from there? I’m going to assume you have questions after that. And you respond with your questions. ‘Well, I want to talk to you.’ ‘I’d like to do this by email initially, and just get my questions answered that way. If you want to send me an audio file, happy to listen to what you say. But let’s do this in this way first. And if I’m interested, I’ll definitely go on the interview.’ That’s all you have to do.

Recruiters Are Not Your Friends

Why is the question of future sponsorship asked in every job posted on LinkedIn? Well, that’s easy. Oh, I’m going to answer this question. And then I’m going to Hi, how are you? And I’ll come back to you in just one second after I answer this one.

 

So why is the question of future sponsorship asked on every job posted on LinkedIn? Easy. Because what they’re trying to confirm is whether you have the legal right to work in the United States. If so, if you have a visa, some positions the firm doesn’t want to do a visa transfer, they don’t want to spend the money to do so. And as such, what they what they’re trying to do is to prequalify that part of your background. Now, you may not like it. But from their standpoint, they have a legal responsibility in the United States to confirm that you have the legal right to work in the US and under what conditions. For example, if you have an f1 visa, which is a student visa, there are certain responsibilities that they have. A b1 visa certain responsibilities, and each one be certain responsibilities. Each of them has costs associated with them They just want to know, and they may have made a corporate decision that they’re not going to do visa transfers. So why go out and talk to someone and waste their time, if they’re not going to hire you. If you’ve got an h1 B visa, they’ll want to know how much time is left. Or where you are in the renewal process. in order to determine whether they’re interested. All of this stuff comes into play. So why are they asking? Really very simple. They want to know whether they’re going to have to do a visa transfer, sponsor you for a green card with all the ancillary costs, and they’re just trying to figure that out in advance.

 

Can I post on LinkedIn that I’m looking for a job without sounding desperate? So I worked with someone recently, who’s a very senior individual. What I did was have him write an article for LinkedIn and in writing the article, he said, ‘Many of you have contacted me over the years about opportunities and I’ve politely rebuffed you. But my circumstances have now changed. I’m actively looking for a position. Mine is about to end shortly and any help you can afford me would be appreciated.’ That was a big move for him. And the result wound up being a half a dozen people reached out to him, including one about a contract to hire opportunity with someone who knows him many years before. He was able to sort through his options, and choose something that made sense for him. We negotiated a good package. And you can, too. All you have to do is what I said there. ‘Many of you have contacted me over the years about opportunities. And the fact is, I wasn’t interested then. But my circumstances have changed. I’m interested now. If you know of something, or can introduce me to someone, please do so.  Let me know who to contact, whether I can mention your name, whatever works for you. And I appreciate your help.’ People came out of the woodwork and started calling him, inMailing, email and texting. He was great. And he has landed. So there’s that kind of a message. Does that sound desperate to you because it doesn’t sound desperate to me. And it’s about sounding casual, not anxious. Not, “PLEASE! I need a  job. “You don’t want to ever come across that way. So that’s the way I would do it.

How Do I Follow Up on an Application When I Haven’t Heard Back for 2 Weeks?

How can I tell if LinkedIn inbox messages are from a real company or a recruiter? Usually, you do that by clicking on the name of the person who’s messaged you. So the message is in inMail in your inbox, it’s sent from so from a particular person, you pop it open, their name is there. You click the name, you go to their web page or to their LinkedIn page. The page will tell you who they are, and what kind of firm they represent, or what firm they represent. And if it’s a firm you don’t know, click on the company name, it will take you to the LinkedIn page. If they don’t have a LinkedIn page, copy and paste it into Google. You’ll get to their company page. And then from there, that’ll tell you if it’s a third party recruiter or someone representing a real company.

 

Why does by LinkedIn easy application get viewed, but never leads to a job? That’s a fun one. The reason that that happens is your generic profile doesn’t make a good enough case that you’re qualified for the job. So the result winds up being, you’re sending in lots of profiles, because that’s what you’re submitting is a LinkedIn profile for these jobs and the profile is not customized for the individual position. As a result, you’re submitting the application, or the easy application, which is your profile and you’re not getting interviews, because it doesn’t make a case for why you’re qualified. So that’s why you’re not getting interviewed, and never leads to a job. You’re not even going out on dates. And even if they did give you an opportunity to interview, just remember, you got to interview first. And you have to be prepared to represent your qualifications online well enough that they want to choose.

 

Is LinkedIn EasyApply button a good way to apply to new jobs? I noticed that frequently, there is no way to submit a cover letter that way. Am I wasted my time? Here’s the trick about cover letters–you make the cover letter page one of the resume and you make sure there’s all the key words of the requirements of the position and the functionality that you’re performing if they hired you. As a result, no, you’re not wasting your time. But you’re not doing it quite right. So easyapply makes it easy to submit your profile. If you’re submitting a resume, what you’re able to do is make it page make the cover letter page one. And as a result, you know, firms are interested in talking to people and EasyApply doesn’t make that kind of easy.

Answering Behavioral Interview Questions The Right Way

Can a supervisor dismissing an employee, when they see their profile on LinkedIn. Here’s the truth of it. They can do whatever they want and remember, from almost everyone in the United States, you are an at will employee meaning they can fire you for almost any reason. So finding your profile on LinkedIn is one of those reasons. I think it’s stupid and arbitrary. But they in theory could do it. But I would turn around and look at their profile on LinkedIn, because most of them have one. And thus, can a supervisor see it? And could they choose to let you go because they saw the profile there? Yeah, but most aren’t going to do that unless there’s a specific prohibition in the social media policy that your employer has that prohibits you from having a profile. Even with having a profile, let me be clear. Most of the time, you can have a profile but no contact in the profile. So for example, I believe it was JPMorganChase that doesn’t want their people to have LinkedIn profiles. I think that’s awful. I understand their logic. They don’t want people recruited out of the bank. But there’s an impact on people and it affects your ability to find jobs in the future because no recruiter can find you unless they’re searching for your company name and your title. So I’ll just simply say could it happen? Yes. These days does it happen? No. But you never know.

 

Is it acceptable to email a recruiter after applying for a job via Taleo? Yes. If anything, what you do is you send a message to them. It says, ‘I just forwarded my resume to you (or just uploaded my resume) for such and such position. This is my background I sent in. I uploaded it at a given date and time. And I appreciate any feedback that you have. I am very interested in this role.’ So yes, you can send them a message, email, InMail through LinkedIn, text, whatever it is. Follow up with that person.

FEELING DEPRESSED About Your Search? Struggling? Feeling Fatigued?

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game HunterJeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, as well as executive job search coaching, job coaching, and interview coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with over 2400 episodes.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? People hire me to provide No BS career advice whether that is about a job search, hiring better, leadership, management or support with a workplace issue. Schedule a discovery call at my website, www.TheBigGameHunter.us 

My courses are available on my websitewww.TheBigGameHunter.us/courses The courses include ones about Informational InterviewsInterviewing, final interview preparation, salary negotiation mistakes to avoidthe top 10 questions to prepare for on any job interview, and starting a new job.

I do a livestream on LinkedIn, YouTube (on the JobSearchTV.com account) and on Facebook (on the Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter page) Tuesdays and Fridays at 1 PM Eastern. You can send your questions about job search, hiring better, management, leadership or to get advice about a workplace issue to me via messaging on LinkedIn or in chat during the approximately 30 minute show.

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