What Do I Do? I Lost My Dream Job Due to the Unprofessional Behavior of the Recruiter | JobSearchTV.com


Here is my no BS answer this question.

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"What should I do when I lose my dream opportunity because of the unprofessional behavior of the recruiter?"

Recruiters are the bogeyman for a lot of job hunters. And, I must also say, to a lot of corporations. They are blamed for far more than what they are deserved to be blamed for. Since I don't have any details here (I just have the question (I don't have any texture or nuance to what happened and what the recruiter is alleged to have done), I will simply go with what this person suggesting me , which is the person didn't get the job, they wanted the recruiter to do or say something for them and they wouldn't. They deem that to be unprofessional.

You know, maybe I'm wrong here , but most of the time, almost all the time, when job hunters lose a position, even when the recruiter is obnoxious and creepy and incompetent, employers will find a way to hire the person. What they will do is call of the recruiter and say, "Look, back down. You have 2 choices here. We are going to run the hire. Get out of the way and if we actually hire this person, will write you a check when it's all over. The other choice is that you can lose the fee and we won't just talk to the person at all. "

The fact of the matter is, when given those 2 choices the recruiter will say, "You'll do all the work? Just keep me informed. Let me know where to send the invoice to when you hire them and I'll be happy to collect the money. I'm sorry you don't like me. Tell me what I can do differently and I will do it because I want you to like me."

That's the way recruiters conduct themselves, even if they don't use those words. They want to make money. They don't want to lose if the because of bad behavior on their part or yours. Job hunters are more likely to cost recruiters opportunities through bad behavior. Firms start to evaluate recruiters based upon the behavior of job hunters and decide, "you know, this recruiter doesn't do a good enough job screening for us; were going to stop using them."

That's a very likely occurrence. In this 1, here's. What probably happened. You are not qualified to get the job. Your resume stank. You didn't get in the door. Or, if you did, you did not perform. You want to blame the recruiter for that. But, no, it is you that is at issue.. You are the one that failed. The client isn't interested. The recruiter cannot perform telephone or Skype hypnosis to make them do something that they don't want to do. You are angry at the recruiter because they couldn't make it happen.

I could be wrong. I don't think I am. I say that because of the situations where people have complained about me. My client made decisions that they thought were in their best interests. And, you know, you can't persuade people to do things that they don't want to do any more than you are persuadable to buy a car that is more than you can afford or buy a house where you cannot afford to make the 1st mortgage payment. You are not stupid, and neither are they.

Do you really think employers are trying to help you?

You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell you as much as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different yet complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a leadership and career coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com changes that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

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7 Responses
  1. Maurice Levie

    Nice strawman but mostly false.
    You mean nothing to either the cruiter nor the company – what that means is
    that you can be used to soothe or handle the payback over a perceived
    slight. I found out after an onsite interview that the contractor they
    placed two weeks prior had walked off the job, and that the company was
    livid. I wrote it off as a nice test interview and blackballed the agency.
    Recruiters are routinely pressed into service to get H1-B’s in the door,
    and you’ve been used.
    Folks, there was a time when recruiters really did a bang up
    Job. When HR was too slow, not functional, or just didn’t serve the
    business, but those days are over. The contract for hire system is here to
    stay and face it, you can spam a HR ATS system for all companies in your
    speciality with a few key clicks. Chances are a job posted for more than a
    month will never be filled, and no amount of recruiting is gonna fix that.
    My advice is to dump recruiters, or get them to reveal their source, and
    then apply to the company directly. Chances are your current company will
    get inundated with resumes once you reveal who you work for – recruiters
    are salespeople not priests

    1. Jeff Altman

      +Maurice, you are projecting a lot into the question that was asked. It doesn’t offer enough info to be specific. I don’t disagree with your comments here and on other of my videos that employees have become commodities, However, your suggestion that information be stolen from recruiters is despicable. There are no circumstances where that should ever be the first course of action. Job hunters don’t want to be treated badly yet you recommend that they go out and proactively treat an absolute stranger who has not done anything to harm them, treat them like vermin and steal money from their families. I draw the line on recommending theft in any firm.

    2. Maurice Levie

      Jeff Altman not vermin, merely turn the tables on them. I’d gladly name names, the examples are just too thick. I’ve had several agencies burn me at clients that were scrupulous in the past just by them getting resumes with their superimposed letterhead into the hiring manager first. Never knew they were there, they just plucked my resume off dice. So spare me the fake pearl
      Clutch. I have found that cruiters will open up all registers on emotions and it’s just a ploy. Google’s practices on using cruiters has fundamentally changed the market, and for the better.
      Oh, there’s this delicious piece floating around about how multi-level recruiters treat each other. Couldn’t believe it until I watched Grifters one day.
      Nice try Jeff 🙂

  2. Maurice Levie

    Nice strawman but mostly false.
    You mean nothing to either the cruiter nor the company – what that means is that you can be used to soothe or handle the payback over a perceived slight. I found out after an onsite interview that the contractor they placed two weeks prior had walked off the job, and that the company was livid. I wrote it off as a nice test interview and blackballed the agency. Recruiters are routinely pressed into service to get H1-B’s in the door, and you’ve been used.
    Folks, there was a time when recruiters really did a bang up
    Job. When HR was too slow, not functional, or just didn’t serve the business, but those days are over. The contract for hire system is here to stay and face it, you can spam a HR ATS system for all companies in your speciality with a few key clicks. Chances are a job posted for more than a month will never be filled, and no amount of recruiting is gonna fix that. My advice is to dump recruiters, or get them to reveal their source, and then apply to the company directly. Chances are your current company will get inundated with resumes once you reveal who you work for – recruiters are salespeople not priests

  3. Maurice Levie

    Nice strawman but mostly false.
    You mean nothing to either the cruiter nor the company – what that means is that you can be used to soothe or handle the payback over a perceived slight. I found out after an onsite interview that the contractor they placed two weeks prior had walked off the job, and that the company was livid. I wrote it off as a nice test interview and blackballed the agency. Recruiters are routinely pressed into service to get H1-B’s in the door, and you’ve been used.
    Folks, there was a time when recruiters really did a bang up
    Job. When HR was too slow, not functional, or just didn’t serve the business, but those days are over. The contract for hire system is here to stay and face it, you can spam a HR ATS system for all companies in your speciality with a few key clicks. Chances are a job posted for more than a month will never be filled, and no amount of recruiting is gonna fix that. My advice is to dump recruiters, or get them to reveal their source, and then apply to the company directly. Chances are your current company will get inundated with resumes once you reveal who you work for – recruiters are salespeople not priests

    1. Jeff Altman

      +Maurice, you are projecting a lot into the question that was asked. It doesn’t offer enough info to be specific. I don’t disagree with your comments here and on other of my videos that employees have become commodities, However, your suggestion that information be stolen from recruiters is despicable. There are no circumstances where that should ever be the first course of action. Job hunters don’t want to be treated badly yet you recommend that they go out and proactively treat an absolute stranger who has not done anything to harm them, treat them like vermin and steal money from their families. I draw the line on recommending theft in any firm.

    2. Maurice Levie

      Jeff Altman not vermin, merely turn the tables on them. I’d gladly name names, the examples are just too thick. I’ve had several agencies burn me at clients that were scrupulous in the past just by them getting resumes with their superimposed letterhead into the hiring manager first. Never knew they were there, they just plucked my resume off dice. So spare me the fake pearl
      Clutch. I have found that cruiters will open up all registers on emotions and it’s just a ploy. Google’s practices on using cruiters has fundamentally changed the market, and for the better.
      Oh, there’s this delicious piece floating around about how multi-level recruiters treat each other. Couldn’t believe it until I watched Grifters one day.
      Nice try Jeff 🙂

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