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NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

More of What to Expect on a Second Interview | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/03/23/more-of-what-to-expect-on-a-second-interview

EP 690 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter offers more detail about what to expect on a second interview.

Summary

This is another 1 of those daily shows I do about job search. My channel on YouTube is TheBigGameHunterTV . I have a lot there that you can watch the will help you with your job search. This is a show about 2nd interviews and a few of the things that you can expect of the 2nd interview.

The 1st thing I always tell people that you will meet a whole new crew of people. You already spoken to HR and maybe a line manager. Sometimes all it had you talk to the team; sometimes or have you talked to the user population.

1 of the interesting things about meeting with the business group that this job supports or a different constituency that the job supports is that their agenda is sometimes a little bit different. If you watch my video called, "The Single Best Question You Should Ask on Any Interview," I want to ask that question again of the user population or the 2nd group in order to make sure that you get their thoughts about what they are expecting from someone in the job.

You can't assume that what you been told. up until this point is the same that they are going to be looking for.

I was on intake call yesterday with the hiring manager who is trying to fill a position. It was an IT job and he was talking about what his boss was looking for in hiring him and his replacement (he's to be moving on to another job). We got to a point where we were talking about the user group. It was my turn to ask questions. I asked, "Are they clear about what they are looking for and how does it match up with what you expect to be looking for?"

The cat was now let out of the bag. "Yes, it is going to be complicated because the 2 groups have a different viewpoint of what is to be looked for… Completely different viewpoints." He tried to make the best out of it, but I heard loud and clear that they are on different pages as to how they are doing the interview.

Expect this group is going to go into more detail with your background. Whoever it is, I don't care if you're an IT accounting, engineering, or whatever, expect that they are going to go with the meticulous detail about what you did, how you went about doing it. If you are an IT, the technology that you utilized. Why you made certain decisions… All this sort of stuff that comes up in an interview.

Thus, if they start off with some questioning on the 1st interview that they didn't quite get to complete, expect that they are going to complete it here.

They may pose some behavioral interview situations to you. Some "what if" scenario to you just as a way of seeing how you think. This is more true of higher level positions than it is for staff level jobs AND it sometimes occurs in staff level interviews.

In answering questions like this, remember, you are signaling how you would be as an employee in their organization. You also want to tie your answer into something that you already know about the job. Understand that they are asking these questions for a reason and they are not just simply hypothetical, out of the blue, nonsensical questions... Most of the time. As such, you want to tie the bow on your experience and how you do the job in the context of what they are looking for.

You can expect to talk money with them. Someone is going to ask how much you are making and how much you are looking for. It's almost going to be a casual thing at a certain point in the interview were almost everything has been done so far, but they will cover it at some point. They may talk about next steps… What their expectations are... Frankly, if they don't, I want you to ask about them.

It's kind of like in dating… "So where do we go from here?" You want to ask them, if they don't explain it to you, "I assume that you're talking to other people. When should I expect to hear back from you about next steps? What would those next steps be." It's questions along those lines that you want to pose in a logical break-point in the interview.

So when they ask, "So, is there anything else?" You'll see that they're trying to get out the door... That's really the ideal time to ask this. "I know you have other things to contend with today. I just want to ask you, I assume that you're interviewing other people, when you explode back to complete this round and when can I expect to hear back about next steps."

"Well, we have people schedule between now and doomsday. Sometime around when hell freezes over you will hear back from us." Okay, they have told you that they are not interested. You get where I'm going to from here.

When all is said and done, these are all pretty predictable things that happened on 2nd interviews and things that you should anticipate and be prepared for. I have another few videos on 2nd interviews. Look for those on YouTube. I think you'll find some great value from them as well.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Your Worth | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/05/23/your-worth-nobsjobsearchadvicecom

EP 1113 On this show,  I walk through a simple technique that anyone can do to establish your value.

Summary

This video is entitled, "Your Worth." Your worth is consistently 1 of the things that people undervalue and they do so for one very simple reason – – they don't understand their value. They go into the job market and decide they are looking for a certain percentage increase over what they currently earn without making any comparisons.

Comparisons have value and I understand that employers attempt to value you based upon previous salary. After all, they are not going to take a $65,000 per your person and pay them $135,000, or are they? Not unless they go into consulting 1st and establish themselves as earning $65-$90 per hour . In which case, at $65, they are earning $130,000 per year and at $90 per hour they are earning $180,000 per year. Then, they will try to drop you down.

What can you do to establish your value?

The 1st thing you need to do is to establish it in your own mind. You need to understand how you compare with others. You are not going to find that out online. You're going to find out by talking to hiring managers and other organizations to get a sense of how they would value you and your skills without telling them necessarily that you are looking for job but you just want to try get a sense of how they would evaluate you. For example, don't tell them what you are currently earning; just asked him to give you a sense of what your capabilities are and how they would assess you. That's a more valuable benchmark for any online survey you might ever read.

After all, the surveys are very limited. They may offer a job title; they may offer skill set. There is no depth in that. For example, if you are in IT and it says, "Java developer," what does that really say? There are tons of different tools to go along with that.

How do you get that sense? The 1st place is internally so that in this way, you are persuasive with someone else. Then, from there, I think the 2nd places during the waiting. A lot of job hunters do things that devalue themselves and often that occurs during the waiting process. They become anxious they REALLY want it. Their desperation comes across and kind of like the guy or girl in a dating situation who is waiting by the phone pining for that person to call them to the point where they turn into a stalker who called for 5 different times in a short period of time to try to flush out that person they were out with, you don't want to come across as being desperate. Desperation doesn't work, does it?

You will like it. After all, if you walked into a car dealership and the salesperson tried to push you into buying a car or they were selling life insurance and they try to push you into a policy, employers don't like it and hiring managers don't like it. So why do you act desperate?

You have to control yourself and the best way to do that is to go out on more "dates." By dates, I'm referring to interviews. By doing this, you get a sense of your value. You get a sense of how others perceive you and how that engenders more interesting you. The more interest you get, the better you will feel, the more value you will have and the more persuasiveness you will deliver when talking about your value to others.

You see, it's not just enough that you know your value. That's the starting place. You need to convince other people of your value in the 1st way to do it is with YOUR attitude. Your attitude says a lot to the employer. It says, "Hey, look, I would love to work for you, but there are other fish in the sea, too." That's the same as what they communicate to you, right? "Hey, we'd love to hire you, but were to talk to 25 more people before we circle back and maybe, ask you out again." You have to have your equivalent as well.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

JobSearchTV.com

The Value of Your Employer’s Brand | JobSearchTV.com


Follow Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter on Facebook
http://www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice

In your career and in your job search, the brand your employer has has an impact on you.What is it’s value? That’s today’s topic.

Summary

I'm Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter, the head coach for JobSearchCoachingHQ.com. and welcome. It's Monday morning as I am recording this and I just want to simply say that for many of you, job hunting is become harder than it needs to be. I'm sorry about that but I just want to say that I want to help you.

And if you're interested my coaching you reach out to me. My website is www.thebiggamehunter.us. There are tabs along the top that will tell you have a hire me for different services. AND if we are not connected on LinkedIn, send a connection request to me at www.linkedin.com/in/thebiggamehunter. Mentioned that you listen to the show. Watch the show. I love hearing from folks who I have been helping. So, again, that's www.thebiggamehunter.us. If you have a question for me, message me through www.facebook.com/NoBSCoachingAdvice to send the message to me. I will get to as many as I can.

Today’s subject is about the value of employer branding and I am thinking of this in the context of you making the decision about your next firm. That you have a job offer and you have choices here and you are thinking ahead. WISELY thinking ahead.

So, what happens? What's the impact of employer branding?, Let me give you an example.

If I said to you “store brand detergent” or ALL or Clorox or some other major brand, you will probably think of the store brand as being a little bit “less than.” It may do as good a job, but do you think it is been a little bit less capable than the major brands offer.

If I said to you, Apple, Facebook, Google, you know, I could pick a list of companies here . . . Microsoft . . . If I mentioned those names and then I said to you, “3 guys in the garage,” “Moe, Larry and Curly” . . . making up names (If there's any “3 guys in a garage,” “Moe Larry and Curly” businesses out there. I apologize. I'm just making these up as I go along. This is not a reflection on you and your business. I am making a comparison here). If I compared the major brands with those two I made up on the fly there, would you think that the latter brands, the ones I made up, the ones are less valuable and less able than the major brands, of course you would !

Thus, major brands have invested a lot of money creating a halo around their products and, by default, a halo around you, that's going to help you with your job search.

People think that individuals who work at certain firms and, obviously, not only these firms . . . There are a lot of major firms out there that people work who have a great reputation for their business, their service, or their products and it becomes connected with the employee.

Conversely, if you work for a nothing brand or one that has a negative image in the market, well, you have a problem. I’ll give you an example and this is an extreme one.
I'm sure none of you have, fortunately, had this experience.

When I still did recruiting and Bernie Madoff became well-known for the wrong reasons, I remember getting resumes from people who worked for that firm and they couldn’t find work because they were tarnished with the same brush stroke as those who had been intimately involved with the fraud. They didn't know anything about it. I'm confident about that, but they could not find work. At least they couldn't for close to a year, I lost track of them after that. But the impact of working for a “no name” or “a negative name” affects you as adversely as the positive want benefits you.

So, if you have choices between a great brand and a nothing, there is a dollar value associated with it, not just simply now, but when you go out to your next employer after that.

There are different doors are open to you than their might be if you're working for, shall we say, the other negative brand. Always consider the major brand when you considering a decision between alternatives.

This is not to say that the small firm, the one that's less well-known, is a problem. They may not be! They may be a great organization, but is a dollar cost impact on you for joining the smaller firm that is usually the less well-known firm.

I hope you found this helpful. Again, this is Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter. If you're interested my coaching you, visit www.thebiggamehunter.us. There is a lot there that you can watch, listen to or read that is going to help you find work more quickly. But I put it together for you so that you don’t have to figure it out.

Also, take my classes on Skillshare, There are classes on basic interview questions that will help you, shall we say, help you get through the initial phases of conversations with HR and other organizations.

Have a great day. Take care!

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

What Do You Hate Most in Life? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/03/18/what-do-you-hate-most-in-life

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this subtle interview question.

Summary

I've got another 1 of those tough interview questions for you that are designed to make you ,DRAMATIC VOICE> squirm and panic and confess things about yourself that you really shouldn't confess... Ooooooooooooh! This was actually very easy if you stop, take a short breath and realize what they are really looking for.

Today's question is, "What do you hate most in life?" WOW!! What are you supposed to say? I hate my mother-in-law? I hate this person. I hate that person. I hate what I do professionally. That's why I'm trying to become a poet on the side... There are all sorts of idiotic answers that you can give. But look at it from their standpoint.

This question to be answered a little bit differently depending upon what level in the organization you work. The theme starts off the same way.

"I try not to dwell on the negative too often. If you would ask me in a professional context what I hate most, 1 of the things that frustrates me more than anything (You notice I change from hate to frustrate. Frustration is anger internally directed. It is not externally directed. It is a subtle shift but your switching off the word "hate") is seeing people got involved with on a day in and day out basis not really putting in their best effort. That sort of lazy approach to work frustrates the heck out of me because I care a lot about doing a great job. I figure that if I'm going to take a check, I'm going to provide excellence. I want my organization to succeed. I want to do my part in making that happen. So when I see someone doing 1/2 ass job or not giving their best were not asking for help when they need it, it frustrates the heck out of me." You can get a little bit theatrical here.

Here's where the shift starts to occur.

You start as a staff person, you don't want to say, "I go to my boss and then tell them, 'How come they are able to get away with crap and I can't?'" No one wants to hear that stuff. What you try to do is motivate through your own behavior. You want to encourage to your own behavior. You want to be the person who isn't brought down by the others; you want to inspire the others.

If you are a manager, the answer might be slightly different. You want to, again, encourage and motivate but you are also going to be more of an interventionist, trying to cheerlead people into better effort.

If you're at a higher level of management, you may talk about systemic problems and trying to route the mail. Again, it all depends on the level of an organization that you are joining but the theme all starts off with, " I get frustrated when I see people in an organization or people in my department, or people on my team who just don't have the motivation or drive in the excitement about doing their best work. That's important to me." Then you talk about what you try to do to compensate for that.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

Job Search Radio

Tough Interview Questions: How Do You Like to Be Managed? | JobSearchRadio.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://webtalkradio.net/internet-talk-radio/2018/06/18/tough-interview-questions-how-do-you-like-to-be-managed-jobsearchradio-com/

It isn’t that this question is so tough; it’s just that there are different in ways to answer it.

Summary

I suspect almost everyone knows what they are not supposed to do in answering this question. In doing so, I just want to make sure--You don't want to be critical of the previous manager.
" I work with some great people but there was this 1 person-- she was abominable to me!"
You don't want to go down that road. You don't want to make it seem like your manager is a snoop or a micromanager. You don't want to ever be critical of anyone from before AND at the same time on the opposite side of this, you don't want to seem like such a strong advocate for one position or another or one type of management style or another that you come across a little crazy.
"I really work well with people who are…" You don't want to go there either.
The 3rd thing is you also don't want to seem desperate. "Oh, I need a job. I can work with anybody." You don't want to go there either.
Here's what I want you to do and I want you to think of this from the standpoint of you are in real need of a job, or you are exploring of things and it really has to be the right thing.
If you really do need a job, maybe you been out of work for a while or, emotionally, you need to get back to work, you want to talk about the right style for you.
"I don't think anyone wants to work for a micromanager. At the same time, a person who manages has a responsibility to an organization to ensure that the people in their care are doing the right stuff. I understand I work well with management who basically gives me an assignment and the sense of how they want me to do it, lets me go off and do it and wants me to check in with them from time to time to ensure that I’m on the right track and who I feel I can go to and ask for advice and input." That's a great approach that I think works well, whether your staff individual or at a manager level and above.
The tricky thing is if you are anxious or you do need a job quickly, you might say something along the lines of, "If that's the style that, doesn't work for you, give me a sense of how you manage for you because, the fact of the matter is, I can adapt. " What you're trying to do is communicate that you're not so set in your ways that you are demanding something.
However you describe the management style (maybe it's different than the style that I laid out), if you want to describe something very different and you don't have a real need for a new position, I want you to be prepared to talk about it in more detail. I offered one framework, but you can offer your own that makes sense for you. You can look someone square in the eye and say, "This is what has worked very well for me in the past and that really gets results for me." Then leave it at that. You don't continue on and say, "If that doesn't work for you, we can call it quits today. My feelings won't be hurt and, I suspect, yours won’t be either." Don't go down the road.
Instead, lay out your case for the kind of style that works for you, how it is benefit you and the organization in the past and how you’ve gotten great results from doing it that way.

And leave it at that.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Would you like to connect with a motivated audience of job hunters. [email protected]
for information

No BS Hiring Advice

Hiring and Interviewing Mistakes That Are Made WAY Too Often | No BS Hiring Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/nobshiringadvice/2016/03/28/hiring-and-interviewing-mistakes-that-are-made-way-too-often

I talk about a few of the mistakes both HR professionals and hiring managers make WAY too often.

 

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

 

NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

Negotiating an Above Average Salary Offer | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com

EP 1139 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to negotiate an above average salary offer from the get go.

Summary

There is a lot of advice that you get talking about researching the salary range for position like yours. I will work with some general things; please understand I'm just using this as an example.

Let's say that the salary range that you're looking at is $100,000-$125,000. If you are entering into a negotiation, and you quote that figures to them, the employer is immediately going to zero in on $100,000 and, in point of fact, you are zeroing in on $125,000.

I'm not going to tell you to shave the numbers for them and take out that $100,000 and switch it to $115,000-$125,000. The same problem will occur. I want you to go directly at it and very simply say, "if you do some research, you'll see a whole host of numbers. A few of them mention $100,000. Most of them talk about a higher range, probably closer to one $125,000. I want to be clear with you. I'm not an average performer. I am clearly up an above average performer. As a result, these average numbers are below what my expectations are. I'm looking for something from you that shows me that you really see my value because, as I have done before, I can do for you, too, or better."

Notice what I've done? I acknowledge the average numbers. I will also say, "I'm not average. I'm above average. I've done it before. I want to do it again and do it for you." And you are not settling.

You don't want to be seen as the average. You always want to be seen as the above average. Remember, at the end of the day, you can always cave-in, right? And you can always say no. Initially, when you doing the salary negotiation or if you're being interviewed and they are starting to think in their minds what your value is based upon your previous earnings, they are always going to zero in on lower numbers and you always want to be pushing them at the earliest point to higher numbers.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

I Was Contacted By A Facebook Recruiter. I’m Not Interested in Changing Jobs | No BS Job Search Advice Radio


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/02/25/i-was-contacted-by-a-facebook-recruiter-im-not-interested-in-changing-jobs

EP 1026  I’ll start with the whole question and then offer an answer.

Summary

Here's today's question. I thought was an interesting want to start off the day with. Here's the scenario. I have been given. "I have been a software developer for about 10 years. I have a good job, although I don't work at any super famous company like Facebook, Google, Microsoft and such. I have a good project. Nice team and the salary I am comfortable with. I'm neither a genius, nor a guru. I'm often very unsure myself and sometimes freeze in interviews. So, I only change my job. What I need to, not to get a raise or anything. I've been contacted by a Facebook recruiter today. He asked me if I was interested in an interview. But the fact is, I'm not. Not really. Don't think I haven't tried to get into a big company. I have. Actually, I failed to Amazon on-site interviews and one Google phone screen all in the past 3 years . I understand the Facebook interview might be useful experience, even if I don't get past the phone screen. I just don't want another experience of a failure. How should I answer?"

Let me deconstruct the question little bit. When I was tell people is that the person who gets ahead isn't always the smartest or work the hardest (although those a great qualities to have). People get ahead by being alert to opportunity. Sometimes they are internal to the company; more often than not, they are external.

When I read that you freeze on interviews (you only change jobs when you need to), there is where I kind of zero in for a second. Part of that is because frankly, interviewing is just another skill that you need to develop. You are focused on the skills needed to perform your job, rather than the skills needed to get hired for a job. Just as an aside, that is what www.jobsearchcoachinghq.com is about. It helps people focusing on learning the skills needed to do a job search. That involves resumes, interviewing, answering tough interview questions, negotiating, resigning. There are whole. Most of different things that the site covers.

I'll simply say that you need to learn the skills needed to interview so that you have more confidence in yourself and your ability when you do. That's where you pick up on "freeze in the interview so that I only change my job when I need to not to get a raise or anything." That also tells me that you're probably being taken advantage of it. Your employer as well. That's because, frankly, helping you get ahead on 3% raises? Or 5% raises?

The way the system is set up, you need to do strategic job changes from time to time in order to advance financially. For example, let's say, you are a $100,000 per year person who gets a 4% raise or 5% raise. You are now it $105,000. Yay! But let's say you change jobs for an additional $15,000 per year and then get a 5% raise… Do you get where I'm going with this? The system is set up for you to change jobs every 2 to 3 years tops. I've read on the statistically in another case, if you change jobs for a $10,000 raise and, after 3 years, change jobs again for another $10,000 raise… Let's just work the math here. You are at $100,000 per year and change jobs for $10,000 raise. After 3 years, you are plus $30,000. Then, you change your job again after 3 years for another $10,000 raise (I'm not taking into account the raises that you might get and how much hired your salary will be after you are on board. That's because if you get a 4% raise on $100,000, that's a 4% raise. If you get on $110,000, it is going to be a higher number).

If you change jobs again after 3 years, you are now $70,000 ahead after 5 years because you are plus $10,000 twice. Can you afford to give up $70,000 per year pretax? Translated about $30,000-$40,000 per year after tax in order to be "comfortable?" I 0 in on that stuff.

Putting it aside, how do you respond to the recruiter. "Could you tell me about the role you have in mind for me and how you might see I could help?" Listen to what they have to say. I want to practice that into a habit instead of the fear habit that you have. Start thinking of yourself as being capable.

They may not want to hire you but you have to work on your interview and job search skills so that when you do hear about a position you can act on it and be prepared to act on it. You want to have a resume that is up to date and update every 3 to 4 months even if you send it nowhere. I want you to hear that again. Even if you sent it nowhere in order to ensure that if you do hear about a position, you can act on it.

It also has the 2nd big benefit that come review time, you are well prepared for your review because I've seen any number of situations where, right before review time, a manager leaves and you're being critiqued by someone who doesn't know your work and people get a little uncomfortable under those circumstances. Maybe they are being critiqued for a two-month period of time when the new manager is there, but you have a full year of experiences that you need to educate your new manager about.

Having your resume out that they will help you with that. It would also allow you to respond quickly to opportunities that are presented because invariably someone asks for a resume, right? You need to learn particular job search skills so that comes a time that the phone rings and it is a job that you are interested in you are ready to roll.

So, asked him to tell you about the job and how you might be able to help, listen, and then say, "That's interesting. Could you give me an hour to think about it?" I'm doing this from the standpoint of helping you practice. Helping you practice responding to these inquiries and not just simply having the knee-jerk, "I'm not interested. I don't want to get rejected"kind of reaction.

So, again, practice interviewing in practice how you respond with this recruiter.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

NoBSJobSearchAadvice.com

What’s the Probability of Two Dice Coming Up With Different Numbers? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2017/04/26/whats-the-probability-of-two-dice-coming-up-with-different-numbers

Ep 727 Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains how to answer this brain teaser, “What is the probability of two regulation dice coming up with different numbers?”

Summary

We are going to do 1 of those fun hedge fund questions. Let's see how you do. You have a pair of dice. They are regulation. Perfect. Un-tampered with.What is the probability that you are not going to roll a pair?

We start by trying to figure out what the possible combinations are that might exist. How many different sorts of numbers might exist. The answer is 36, by the way.. Then we start looking at the number of possible pairs that we have. 1 and 1.. 2 and to. 3 and 3. You get the idea. 6 possible pairs.

6/36 is 1/6 Is the probability of rolling a pair. If 6/36 is the probability of rolling the pair, that means that 5/6 is the probability of not rolling a pair.. You have is 5/6 probability of not rolling a pair.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career and leadership coach who worked as a recruiter for what more than 40 years. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1100 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter
Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

What’s The Best Way to Get Your Résumé Noticed? | NoBSJobSearchAdvice.com


Listen to the full episode here:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thebiggamehunter/2018/02/13/whats-the-best-way-to-get-your-rsum-noticed-no-bs-job-search-advice-radio

That’s an interesting question… But the wrong one.

Summary

The question I was asked is, "What's the best way to get your resume noticed?" I want to preface my answer, which will be directed to the point like they always are, by saying that if you are submitting your resume, you are swimming in the pond with everyone else. It's hard to be caught as a fish if you're in there with millions of other fish., What you're telling me is that you are attempting to approach this through traditional channels by submitting your resume through an applicant tracking system or some other form of direct communication, rather than working at networking through the hiring manager, developing a relationship with that person, and trying to gain entrée that way.

Be that is it me, I just given a summary of the preferred way to do things -- you would not submit a resume; you have an introduction to someone by someone who knows them will vouch for you and give you the opportunity to present yourself to the manager.

If you really want to submit your resume, the best way, if you are determined to send it through an applicant tracking system, is to DEMONSTRATE THAT YOUR BACKGROUND ACTUALLY FITS THE JOB. Make it obvious as though the reader is 6 years old reading the resume that you fit this.

How do you do that?

If you have a job description (after all, you question tells me that you want to submit your resume against the particular job), make sure that all the criteria of the job description are your resume. Make it so it is obvious!

In doing this, you want to use their language. For example, there was someone I was coaching, who is in a sales role. He would normally talk about how he it helped increase sales by a certain percentage. However, the firm he was interviewing with spoke in terms of 4X or 10X. Language along those lines. You want to use their language because you want to be understood by them. It's like speaking French and interviewing in Germany. If you don't speak the same language, it is harder to connect.

Take the time to speak their language. Use their phrasing in your resume. Make the fit obvious even if you're going to use a summary at the very top of your resume that takes care of the requirements of the position, the functionality of the job, and lays out each of them.

For example, this is always an easy one. when I use IT as an example, you list the skill and next to it you might write, "3 years/current." Then you would list the next skill and say, "2 years/until one year ago." Item by item into columns so that the fit is obvious to the reader and you're not making them struggle to find the information.

(2) As you proceed, the rest of your resume needs to confirm what you've just written and use their language.

(3) Finally (this is one the people sometimes forget), make sure your LinkedIn profile is congruent with what you say your resume. If the profile isn't congruent (it doesn't have to use the same language because I'm assuming that you're not submitting your resume to just one company), you want to make sure that your profile is as all-inclusive as possible, telling the story of what your background is so that, as I said, a 6-year-old knows that you can do this job.

ABOUT JEFF ALTMAN, THE BIG GAME HUNTER

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a coach who worked as a recruiter for what seems like one hundred years. His work involves career coaching, all as well as executive job search coaching and life coaching. He is the host of “No BS Job Search Advice Radio,” the #1 podcast in iTunes for job search with more than 1000 episodes,“ Job Search Radio,” “and his newest show, “No BS Coaching Advice” and is a member of The Forbes Coaches Council.

Are you interested in 1:1 coaching, interview coaching, advice about networking more effectively, how to negotiate your offer or leadership coaching? Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us and click the relevant tab on the top of the page.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com offers great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.  

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter

Connect with me on LinkedIn. Like me on Facebook.

Join and attend my classes on Skillshare. Become a premium member and get 2 months free.

You can order a copy of “Diagnosing Your Job Search Problems” for Kindle on Amazon and receive free Kindle versions of “No BS Resume Advice” and “Interview Preparation.” If you are starting your search, order, “Get Ready for the Job Jungle.”

Don’t forget to give the show 5 stars and a good review in iTunes

If you want to know how to win more interviews, order “Winning Interviews.” You’ll learn how to win phone interviews, in-person interviews, the best question to ask on any interview and more.

Would you like to talk through a salary negotiation or potential negotiation you’re involved with? Order and schedule time with me.

Do you have questions or would like advice about networking or any aspect of your search. Order and schedule time with me.

Would you like me to critique your resume. Order a critique from me

For more about LinkedIn, order “Stacked: Double Your Job Interviews, Leverage Recruiters and Unlock LinkedIn.”

Jeff’s Kindle book, “You Can Fix Stupid: No BS Hiring Advice,” is available on Amazon.

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